Publications by authors named "Frank J Aangenendt"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Nonmonotonic swelling and compression dynamics of hydrogels in polymer solutions.

Phys Rev E 2020 Dec;102(6-1):062606

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Materials Technology, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600MB Eindhoven, Netherlands.

Hydrogels are sponge-like materials that can absorb or expel significant amounts of water. Swelling up from a dried state, they can swell up more than a hundredfold in volume, with the kinetics and the degree of swelling depending sensitively on the physicochemical properties of both the polymer network and the aqueous solvent. In particular, the presence of dissolved macromolecules in the background liquid can have a significant effect, as the macromolecules can exert an additional external osmotic pressure on the hydrogel material, thereby reducing the degree of swelling. In this paper, we have submerged dry hydrogel particles in polymer solutions containing large and small macromolecules. Interestingly, for swelling in the presence of large macromolecules we observe a concentration-dependent overshoot behavior, where the particle volume first continuously increases toward a maximum, after which it decreases again, reaching a lower, equilibrium value. In the presence of smaller macromolecules we do not observe this intriguing overshoot behavior, but instead observe a rapid growth followed by a slowed-down growth. To account for the observed overshoot behavior, we realize that the macromolecules entering the hydrogel network not only lead to a reduction of the osmotic pressure difference, but their presence within the network also affects the swelling behavior through a modification of the solvent-polymer interactions. In this physical picture of the swelling process, the net amount of volume change should thus depend on the magnitudes of both the reduction in osmotic pressure and the change in effective solvent quality associated with the macromolecules entering the pores of the hydrogel network. We develop a phenomenological model that incorporates both of these effects. Using this model we are able to account for both the swelling and compression kinetics of hydrogels within aqueous polymer solutions, as a function of the size of the dissolved macromolecules and of their effect on the effective solvent quality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevE.102.062606DOI Listing
December 2020

Diffusing-wave spectroscopy in a standard dynamic light scattering setup.

Phys Rev E 2017 Dec 18;96(6-1):062611. Epub 2017 Dec 18.

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

Diffusing-wave spectroscopy (DWS) extends dynamic light scattering measurements to samples with strong multiple scattering. DWS treats the transport of photons through turbid samples as a diffusion process, thereby making it possible to extract the dynamics of scatterers from measured correlation functions. The analysis of DWS data requires knowledge of the path length distribution of photons traveling through the sample. While for flat sample cells this path length distribution can be readily calculated and expressed in analytical form; no such expression is available for cylindrical sample cells. DWS measurements have therefore typically relied on dedicated setups that use flat sample cells. Here we show how DWS measurements, in particular DWS-based microrheology measurements, can be performed in standard dynamic light scattering setups that use cylindrical sample cells. To do so we perform simple random-walk simulations that yield numerical predictions of the path length distribution as a function of both the transport mean free path and the detection angle. This information is used in experiments to extract the mean-square displacement of tracer particles in the material, as well as the corresponding frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. An important advantage of our approach is that by performing measurements at different detection angles, the average path length through the sample can be varied. For measurements performed on a single sample cell, this gives access to a wider range of length and time scales than obtained in a conventional DWS setup. Such angle-dependent measurements also offer an important consistency check, as for all detection angles the DWS analysis should yield the same tracer dynamics, even though the respective path length distributions are very different. We validate our approach by performing measurements both on aqueous suspensions of tracer particles and on solidlike gelatin samples, for which we find our DWS-based microrheology data to be in good agreement with rheological measurements performed on the same samples.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevE.96.062611DOI Listing
December 2017

Compression and Reswelling of Microgel Particles after an Osmotic Shock.

Phys Rev Lett 2017 Sep 31;119(9):098001. Epub 2017 Aug 31.

Institute for Complex Molecular Systems, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

We use dedicated microfluidic devices to expose soft hydrogel particles to a rapid change in the externally applied osmotic pressure and observe a surprising, nonmonotonic response: After an initial rapid compression, the particle slowly reswells to approximately its original size. We theoretically account for this behavior, enabling us to extract important material properties from a single microfluidic experiment, including the compressive modulus, the gel permeability, and the diffusivity of the osmolyte inside the gel. We expect our approach to be relevant to applications such as controlled release, chromatography, and responsive materials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.098001DOI Listing
September 2017

Optimization of alginate purification using polyvinylidene difluoride membrane filtration: Effects on immunogenicity and biocompatibility of three-dimensional alginate scaffolds.

J Biomater Appl 2016 10 25;31(4):510-520. Epub 2016 Apr 25.

Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, USA.

Sodium alginate is an effective biomaterial for tissue engineering applications. Non-purified alginate is contaminated with protein, lipopolysaccharide, DNA, and RNA, which could elicit adverse immunological reactions. We developed a purification protocol to generate biocompatible alginate based on (a) activated charcoal treatment, (b) use of hydrophobic membrane filtration (we used hydrophobic polyvinylidene difluoride membranes to remove organic contaminants), (c) dialysis, and finally (d) ethanol precipitation. Using this approach, we could omit pre-treatment with chloroform and significantly reduce the quantities of reagents used. Purification resulted in reduction of residual protein by 70% down to 0.315 mg/g, DNA by 62% down to 1.28 µg/g, and RNA by 61% down to less than 10 µg/g, respectively. Lipopolysaccharide levels were reduced by >90% to less than 125 EU/g. Purified alginate did not induce splenocyte proliferation in vitro. Three-dimensional scaffolds generated from purified alginate did not elicit a significant foreign body reaction, fibrotic overgrowth, or macrophage infiltration 4 weeks after implantation. This study describes a simplified and economical alginate purification method that results in alginate purity, which meets clinically useful criteria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0885328216645952DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5479495PMC
October 2016
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