Publications by authors named "Floor Aarts"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Gastric bypass may promote weight loss in overweight partners.

J Am Board Fam Med 2015 Jan-Feb;28(1):90-6

From the Departments of Internal Medicine (FA, MvV, DPMB, VEAG), Pediatrics (NNER, IAvR), Medical Psychology/Hospital Psychiatry (CH), and Pharmacy & Pharmacology (JHB), Slotervaart Hospital, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; the Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands (RG); the Health Psychology Section, Department of Health Sciences, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands (CH); the Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands (DPMB, VEAG); and the Diabetes Centre/Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands (MD).

Introduction: Following bariatric surgery, patients are expected to implement diet and lifestyle changes that may be imitated by cohabitating family members. We hypothesize that cohabitating family members will lose weight and improve their eating behavior within 1 year after surgery.

Methods: In this observational prospective study, family members of patients who had gastric bypass surgery (88 partners, 20 children ≥18 years old, and 25 children between 12 and 17 years old) were repeatedly assessed. Family members were asked to assess their weight and height before and 3, 6, and 12 months following bariatric surgery, and they filled out the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire.

Results: Between baseline and 1 year following surgery, 49 partners of patients who underwent gastric bypass surgery (66.2%) lost weight, 6 (8.1%) remained stable, and 19 (25.7%) gained weight. Body mass index of partners (P = .002), particularly of overweight partners (P < .001)-but not children-showed a small, significant decrease over time. No significant changes in eating behavior among partners or children were found.

Conclusion: The study indicates that gastric bypass surgery may have a ripple effect, with body weight in partners of patients decreasing over time. However, there is considerable variation in the postoperative weight loss of partners.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2015.01.140103DOI Listing
September 2015

Attachment anxiety predicts poor adherence to dietary recommendations: an indirect effect on weight change 1 year after gastric bypass surgery.

Obes Surg 2015 Apr;25(4):666-72

Department of Internal Medicine, Slotervaart Hospital, Louwesweg 6, 1066 EC, Amsterdam, The Netherlands,

Background: Weight loss after gastric bypass surgery depends on the adoption of healthy dietary recommendations, which may be influenced by psychological issues and patients' attachment representations (habitual states of mind with respect to interpersonal relations). The present study tests (1) whether attachment representations are associated with dietary adherence, (2) whether dietary adherence and weight loss are correlated and (3) whether dietary adherence mediates the relation of attachment representations with weight reduction after gastric bypass surgery. Besides attachment representations, psychological problems are examined.

Methods: This longitudinal study included 105 patients who had a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass operation. Current and past psychological problems and attachment representations were assessed before surgery. Dietary adherence was assessed 6 and 12 months postsurgery. Patients' weight and height were collected from medical records. Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses and mediation analyses using bootstrapping resampling procedures were conducted.

Results: Of all examined predictor variables, attachment anxiety, i.e., fear of social rejection and abandonment, was most strongly associated with low dietary adherence at both 6 months (p = 0.009) and 12 months (p = 0.006) postsurgery. Dietary adherence 6 months postsurgery was associated with weight loss 1 year after the operation (p = 0.003). Dietary adherence at 6 months (β = 0.51; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.19-1.04) mediated the association between preoperative attachment anxiety and postoperative weight loss.

Conclusions: The results suggest that more anxiously attached patients are less adherent to dietary recommendations 6 months after gastric bypass surgery, influencing weight loss in a negative way during the first year after surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11695-014-1423-7DOI Listing
April 2015

Coping style as a mediator between attachment and mental and physical health in patients suffering from morbid obesity.

Int J Psychiatry Med 2014 ;47(1):75-91

Objective: The presence of mental health problems and limitations in physical functioning is high in patients suffering from morbid obesity. The purpose of the current study was to examine the mediating role of coping style in the relationship between attachment representations and mental health and physical functioning in a morbidly obese population.

Method: A total of 299 morbidly obese patients who were referred to the Slotervaart bariatric surgery unit in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, completed self-report questionnaires assessing adult attachment style (Experiences in Close Relationship-Revised Questionnaire), coping style (Utrecht Coping List), and patients physical functioning and mental health (Short Form-36).

Results: Attachment anxiety (beta = -.490, p < .001) and attachment avoidance (3 = -.387, p < .001) were both found to be related to mental health. In addition, attachment anxiety was also found to be related to physical functioning (beta = - .188,p < .001). Coping style partly mediated these associations.

Conclusions: Findings suggest that coping mediates the association between attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance on the one hand and mental health and physical functioning in patients with morbid obesity on the other hand.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2190/PM.47.1.gDOI Listing
July 2014

Psychologists' evaluation of bariatric surgery candidates influenced by patients' attachment representations and symptoms of depression and anxiety.

J Clin Psychol Med Settings 2014 Mar;21(1):116-23

Department of Internal Medicine, Slotervaart Hospital, Louwesweg 6, 1066 EC, Amsterdam, The Netherlands,

This study examines whether patients self-reported attachment representations and levels of depression and anxiety influenced psychologists' evaluations of morbidly obese patients applying for bariatric surgery. A sample of 250 patients (mean age 44, 84 % female) who were referred for bariatric surgery completed questionnaires to measure adult attachment and levels of depression and anxiety. Psychologists rated patients' suitability for bariatric surgery using the Cleveland Clinic Behavioural Rating System (CCBRS), unaware of the results of the completed questionnaires. Attachment anxiety (OR = 2.50, p = .01) and attachment avoidance (OR = 3.13, p = .001) were found to be associated with less positive evaluations on the CCBRS by the psychologists, and symptoms of depression and anxiety mediated this association. This study strongly supports the notion that patients' attachment representations influence a psychologist's evaluation in an indirect way by influencing the symptoms of depression and anxiety patients report during an assessment interview. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10880-014-9385-4DOI Listing
March 2014
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