Publications by authors named "Farzaneh Nabati"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Characterization and the evaluation of antimicrobial activities of silver nanoparticles biosynthesized from leaf extract.

Heliyon 2020 Mar 19;6(3):e03624. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

Department of Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Tehran Medical Sciences, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran.

A green, direct and cost-effective fabrication method is proposed for Eco-environmentally silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) through leaf extraction of from Iran. Formation of Ag NPs was confirmed through different characterization techniques such as UV-Vis Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). UV-Visible spectrophotometer showed absorbance peak at 440 nm due to the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). Based on XRD results and SEM and TEM analysis, AgNPs were crystalline with face-centered cubic geometry and in different sizes ranged 12-30 nm. Furthermore, FTIR Spectroscopy was utilized to recognize the specific functional groups responsible for reducing ion silver to silver nanoparticles and the capping agents available in the leaf extract. In addition, the antibacterial effect of Eco-friendly synthesized nanoparticles and also leaf extract, were evaluated on four pathogens by implementing minimum inhibitory concentration test (MIC) and agar diffusion assay. The MIC results exhibits more inhibiting activity against gram-negative microorganisms (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) rather than gram-positive microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes). Compared to leaf extract, nanoparticles have better antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2020.e03624DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7090345PMC
March 2020

Effects of standardized hydro-alcoholic extract of leaf on hypertension and biochemical parameters in hypertensive hyperlipidemic type 2 diabetic patients: a randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical trial.

Avicenna J Phytomed 2019 Jan-Feb;9(1):44-53

Medicinal Plants Research Center, Institute of Medicinal Plants, ACECR, Karaj, Iran.

Objective: To study the blood pressure, lipid and glycemic effects and safety of leaf in the hypertensive hyperlipidemic type 2 diabetic patients.

Materials And Methods: The patients took 350 mg standardized plant leaf hydro-alcoholic extract capsule (n=50) or placebo capsule (n=50) three times daily alongside conventional drugs for 2 months. At the baseline and endpoint, systolic and diastolic blood pressures and blood levels of fasting glucose (FG), 2-hr postprandial glucose (2hPPG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total cholesterol (TC), LDL-C, triglyceride, HDL-C, SGOT, SGPT and creatinine were determined in both groups. To evaluate the extract safety, serum SGOT, SGPT and creatinine levels were tested; also, the patients were requested to report any adverse effects.

Results: FG, 2hPPG, HbA1c, TC, LDL-C, triglyceride and systolic and diastolic blood pressures were decreased, whereas HDL-C was increased significantly in the extract group compared to those of the placebo group at the endpoint (for all cases, p<0.05). The extract did not significantly influence other parameters and no adverse effects were reported.

Conclusion: leaf hydro-alcoholic extract as an adjunct to the conventional drugs has additional antihypertensive as well as anti-dyslipidemic and anti-hyperglycemic effects in hypertensive hyperlipidemic type 2 diabetic patients. Besides, the extract lacks hepatic, renal and patient-reported adverse effects.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6369317PMC
February 2019

Standardized Nigella sativa seed oil ameliorates hepatic steatosis, aminotransferase and lipid levels in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical trial.

J Ethnopharmacol 2019 Apr 11;234:106-111. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Medicinal Plants Research Center, Institute of Medicinal Plants, ACECR, Karaj, Iran. Electronic address:

Ethnopharmacological Evidence: Nigella sativa (N. sativa) seeds are used in the Iranian traditional medicine for the treatment of liver diseases.

Aim Of Study: To study the efficacy and safety of N. sativa seed oil in the treatment of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

Materials And Methods: Sixty patients received 2.5 mL fully standardized N. sativa seed oil every 12 h and 60 other patients received placebo for 3 months. At the baseline and endpoint, hepatic steatosis ultrasound grade and blood levels of triglycerides, LDL-C (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol), HDL-C (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol), ALT (alanine aminotransferase), AST (aspartate aminotransferase), blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and complete blood cell count as well as body mass index were determined in the oil and placebo groups and compared.

Results: Grade of hepatic steatosis was significantly reduced in the oil group compared to the placebo group (P = 0.004). Mean ± standard deviation of changes of variables in the oil and placebo groups were respectively 32.6 ± 16.6 and 14.2 ± 19.7% for ALT (P < 0/001), 29.4 ± 16.3 and 12.3 ± 16.8% for AST (P < 0.001), 10 ± 13.9 and 0.22 ± 18.2% for triglycerides (P = 0.001), 14.1 ± 9.8 and 9.2 ± 11.1% for LDL-C (P = 0.01), 9.5 ± 7.7 and 4.8 ± 6.5% for HDL-C (P = 0.001). However, the oil did not significantly affect the other outcome variables compared to the placebo (all P > 0.05). No adverse effect was observed.

Conclusions: The N. sativa seed oil seems to be safe and improve liver steatosis and injury and blood levels of triglycerides, LDL-C and HDL-C in the NAFLD patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2019.01.009DOI Listing
April 2019

A systematic review on the cardiovascular pharmacology of Gaertn.

J Cardiovasc Thorac Res 2018 25;10(3):118-128. Epub 2018 Sep 25.

Medicinal Plants Research Center, Institute of Medicinal Plants, ACECR, Karaj, Iran.

The (EO) fruit has traditionally been considered as a cardioactive medication and has demonstrated remarkable cardiovascular effects in the pharmacological literature. The present study systematically reviews EO's potential for prevention and therapy of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, Proquest, Ebsco, Google, Google Scholar, Ovid, and Cochrane databases were searched from 1966 to 2017 for the English and non-English literature using the terms including the cognates of EO including , Indian gooseberry, and together with antioxidant, arrhythmia, cardioprotective, cardiotoxicity, heart disease, heart failure, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, myocardial dysfunction, and oxidative stress. The inclusion criteria were in vitro, animal, and clinical cardiovascular pharmacological studies conducted on EO and full-text accessibility. The exclusion criterion was studies in which a combination of EO and at least one other plant was investigated. The reference lists of the retrieved articles were also searched manually for additional eligible articles. The methodological quality of clinical trials was assessed by the Jadad scale, and animal studies were evaluated by the ARRIVE checklist. Nineteen articles concerning the cardiovascular pharmacological effects of EO were included in this review. The plant has shown antiatherogenic, anticoagulant, hypolipidemic, antihypertensive, antioxidant, antiplatelet, and vasodilatory effects as well as lipid deposition inhibitory properties. Moreover, it prevents from doxorubicin and isoproterenol cardiotoxicity and myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury, and improves vascular endothelial function in animal studies. Some high-quality clinical studies report the vasodilatory and myocardial antioxidant properties as well as anti-platelet aggregation effects of this plant. EO influences various cardiovascular risk-factors. However, there is not sufficient evidence to confirm the plant efficacy in preventing and treating CVD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15171/jcvtr.2018.20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6203864PMC
September 2018

Effects of an Herbal Combination on Glycemic Control and Lipid Profile in Diabetic Women: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial.

J Evid Based Complementary Altern Med 2017 10 15;22(4):798-804. Epub 2017 Nov 15.

2 Medicinal Plants Research Center, Institute of Medicinal Plants, ACECR, Karaj, Iran.

The present study was conducted to explore the efficacy and safety of a herbal combination in the treatment of women with hyperlipidemic type 2 diabetes. The herbal combination capsule (600 mg) contained Terminalia chebula fruit extract (200 mg), Commiphora mukul (200 mg), and Commiphora myrrha oleo-gum-resin (200 mg), and the placebo capsule contained 600 mg toast powder. The patients in one group took the herbal combination and those in the other group took placebo capsules 3 times a day for 3 months. In the herbal combination-treated patients, the fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were decreased and hidh-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels was increased significantly at the endpoint compared with the placebo and baseline. Other blood parameters such as glycosylated hemoglobin, triglyceride, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, SGOT, and SGPT levels were not significantly changed after 3 months in both groups. In conclusion, the herbal combination improves glycemic control and lipid profile in women with hyperlipidemic type 2 diabetes without any adverse events.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2156587217737683DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5871317PMC
October 2017

Efficacy of Mentha pulegium extract in the treatment of functional dyspepsia: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

J Ethnopharmacol 2017 Jul 30;206:267-273. Epub 2017 May 30.

Medicinal Plants Research Center, Institute of Medicinal Plants, ACECR, Karaj, Iran. Electronic address:

Ethnopharmacological Evidence: Mentha pulegium L. leaves are used in the Iranian traditional medicine for the treatment of functional dyspepsia.

Aim Of Study: To study the efficacy and safety of M. pulegium in the treatment of functional dyspepsia patients fulfilling the Rome III criteria.

Materials And Methods: The efficacy and safety of a standardized Mentha pulegium leaf extract (drug extract ratio: 15.9:1, extraction solvent: 70% v/v aqueous ethanol) (330mg three times daily taken for 2 months) as add-on to one famotidine 40mg tablet per day in the treatment of 50 functional dyspepsia patients were compared with those of a parallel placebo group (n =50).

Results: The extract significantly decreased the total dyspepsia score measured by the Hong Kong dyspepsia index compared to the placebo and baseline (P=0.011 and P<0.001 respectively). The stomach pain, upper abdominal bloating, upper abdominal dull ache, belching and total dyspepsia scores were decreased from baseline in the extract group significantly compared to the placebo (P<0.001, P<0.001, P=0.003, P<0.001 and P<0.001 respectively). However, the decreases of other dyspepsia symptoms scores from baseline in the extract group were not significant compared to the placebo (P>0.05). The extract improved the quality of life measured by the SF-36 questionnaire significantly compared to the placebo and baseline (P=0.003 and P<0.001 respectively). Moreover, the extract lowered the rate of H. pylori infection determined by the urease test significantly compared to the placebo and baseline (P=0.001 and P<0.001 respectively). The extract did not significantly affect the complete blood count and liver and kidney function tests (P>0.05). The patients did not experience any adverse drug effect.

Conclusions: M. pulegium extract (genuine drug extract ratio: 19.4:1; extraction solvent: 70% v/v aqueous ethanol) 270mg three times daily taken for 2 months as adjunct to one famotidine 40mg tablet per day seems safe, improves dyspeptic symptoms and quality of life and eradicates H. pylori in functional dyspepsia patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2017.05.026DOI Listing
July 2017

Salvia officinalis (Sage) Leaf Extract as Add-on to Statin Therapy in Hypercholesterolemic Type 2 Diabetic Patients: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

Int J Mol Cell Med 2016 3;5(3):141-148. Epub 2016 Sep 3.

Diabetes Clinic, Karaj, Iran.

The efficacy and safety of combined with statin have not been evaluated in dyslipidemic diabetes mellitus type 2 (DDMT2) so far. The plant extract antioxidant activity was determined by the DPPH radical scavenging assay. The total flavonoid, total phenolic and quercetin contents of the capsules containing the plant extract were also measured. Moreover, the effects of 2-month extract intake (500 mg capsule three times a day) as add-on to daily use of 15 mg glyburide, 2000 mg metformin and 10 mg atorvastatin on the blood levels of fasting glucose (FG), 2 h postprandial glucose (2hPPG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), creatinine and body mass index were studied in 50 patients and compared with the placebo group (n=50).The extract IC in the DPPH assay was 87.26±0.003 µg/mL (mean±SD), whereas the ascorbic acid IC was 5.626± 0.001 µg/mL (mean±SD). The total flavonoid, total phenolic and quercetin contents of the capsule containing the plant extract were 39.76±3.58 mg of rutin equivalents (mean±SD), 30.33±1.23 mg of gallic acid (mean±SD) and 0.13 mg, respectively. The extract lowered FG, 2hPPG, HbA1c, TC, LDL-C and triglyceride levels, but increased HDL-C level compared to the placebo at the endpoint (P<0.05). The extract did not affect the other parameters significantly and no adverse effect was reported. The extract has substantial antioxidant activity which may be beneficial for the prevention of the cardiovascular complications of DDMT2. Moreover, addition of the extract to statin therapy is apparently safe and further improves lipid profile.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5125366PMC
September 2016

Large scale screening of commonly used Iranian traditional medicinal plants against urease activity.

Daru 2012 Oct 31;20(1):72. Epub 2012 Oct 31.

School of Advanced Medical Technologies, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background And Purpose Of The Study: H. pylori infection is an important etiologic impetus usually leading to gastric disease and urease enzyme is the most crucial role is to protect the bacteria in the acidic environment of the stomach. Then urease inhibitors would increase sensitivity of the bacteria in acidic medium.

Methods: 137 Iranian traditional medicinal plants were examined against Jack bean urease activity by Berthelot reaction. Each herb was extracted using 50% aqueous methanol. The more effective extracts were further tested and their IC50 values were determined.

Results: 37 plants out of the 137 crude extracts revealed strong urease inhibitory activity (more than 70% inhibition against urease activity at 10 mg/ml concentration). Nine of the whole studied plants crude extracts were found as the most effective with IC50 values less than 500 μg/ml including; Rheum ribes, Sambucus ebulus, Pistachia lentiscus, Myrtus communis, Areca catechu, Citrus aurantifolia, Myristica fragrans, Cinnamomum zeylanicum and Nicotiana tabacum.

Conclusions: The most potent urease inhibitory was observed for Sambucus ebulus and Rheum ribes extracts with IC50 values of 57 and 92 μg/ml, respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/2008-2231-20-72DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3556030PMC
October 2012

Urease inhibitory activities of β-boswellic acid derivatives.

Daru 2013 Jan 2;21(1). Epub 2013 Jan 2.

Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy and Medicinal Plants Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Unlabelled:

Background And The Purpose Of The Study: Boswellia carterii have been used in traditional medicine for many years for management different gastrointestinal disorders. In this study, we wish to report urease inhibitory activity of four isolated compound of boswellic acid derivative.

Methods: 4 pentacyclic triterpenoid acids were isolated from Boswellia carterii and identified by NMR and Mass spectroscopic analysis (compounds 1, 3-O-acetyl-9,11-dehydro-β-boswellic acid; 2, 3-O-acetyl-11-hydroxy-β-boswellic acid; 3. 3-O- acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid and 4, 11-keto-β-boswellic acid. Their inhibitory activity on Jack bean urease were evaluated. Docking and pharmacophore analysis using AutoDock 4.2 and Ligandscout 3.03 programs were also performed to explain possible mechanism of interaction between isolated compounds and urease enzyme.

Results: It was found that compound 1 has the strongest inhibitory activity against Jack bean urease (IC50 = 6.27 ± 0.03 μM), compared with thiourea as a standard inhibitor (IC50 = 21.1 ± 0.3 μM).

Conclusion: The inhibition potency is probably due to the formation of appropriate hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions between the investigated compounds and urease enzyme active site and confirms its traditional usage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/2008-2231-21-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3575251PMC
January 2013

A preliminary investigation of the jack-bean urease inhibition by randomly selected traditionally used herbal medicine.

Iran J Pharm Res 2012 ;11(3):831-7

Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy and Medicinal Plants Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection leads to different clinical and pathological outcomes in humans, including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric neoplasia and even gastric cancer and its eradiation dependst upon multi-drug therapy. The most effective therapy is still unknown and prompts people to make great efforts to find better and more modern natural or synthetic anti-H. pylori agents. In this report 21 randomly selected herbal methanolic extracts were evaluated for their effect on inhibition of Jack-bean urease using the indophenol method as described by Weatherburn. The inhibition potency was measured by UV spectroscopy technique at 630 nm which attributes to released ammonium. Among these extracts, five showed potent inhibitory activities with IC50 ranges of 18-35 μg/mL. These plants are Matricaria disciforme (IC50:35 μg/mL), Nasturtium officinale (IC50:18 μg/mL), Punica granatum (IC50:30 μg/mL), Camelia sinensis (IC50:35 μg/mL), Citrus aurantifolia (IC50:28 μg/mL).
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3813127PMC
November 2013

Large-scale virtual screening for the identification of new Helicobacter pylori urease inhibitor scaffolds.

J Mol Model 2012 Jul 3;18(7):2917-27. Epub 2011 Dec 3.

Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 16 Azar Ave, Tehran, Iran.

Here, we report a structure-based virtual screening of the ZINC database (containing about five million compounds) by computational docking and the analysis of docking energy calculations followed by in vitro screening against H. pylori urease enzyme. One of the compounds selected showed urease inhibition in the low micromolar range. Barbituric acid and compounds 1a, 1d, 1e, 1f, 1g, 1h were found to be more potent urease inhibitors than the standard inhibitor hydroxyurea, yielding IC(50) values of 41.6, 83.3, 66.6, 50, 58.8, and 60 μM, respectively (IC(50) of hydroxyurea = 100 μM). 5-Benzylidene barbituric acid has enhanced biological activities compared to barbituric acid. Furthermore, the results indicated that among the substituted 5-benzylidene barbiturates, those with para substitution have higher urease inhibitor activities. This may be because the barbituric acid moiety is closer to the bimetallic nickel center in unsubstituted or para-substituted than in ortho- or meta-substituted analogs, so it has greater chelating ability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00894-011-1310-2DOI Listing
July 2012

Association of saliva fluoride level and socioeconomic factors with dental caries in 3-6 years old children in tehran-iran.

Iran J Pharm Res 2011 ;10(1):159-66

Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Centre, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 14155-6451, Tehran, Iran.

Previous studies have indicated that there may be a relationship between the salivary fluoride concentrations and dental caries while the emphasis was on dental caries in permanent teeth. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental caries and its predictors in 3-6 year-old children in Tehran, Iran. The other objective of this investigation was to clarify a relationship between salivary fluoride levels of the studied children and their socioeconomic situations. The study population consisted of 205 children aged 3-6 years living in Tehran. Each child was examined for dental caries (decayed missing filled teeth (DMFT)) and unstimulated whole mixed saliva was collected 2 h post-prandial. All of the saliva samples were analyzed for fluoride concentration using an ion-specific electrode. The children were then grouped according to their DMFT, salivary fluoride levels (ppm) and socioeconomic factors (parent's education and occupation) that resulted in a statistically significant relationship. The children with (DMFT < 1) were shown to have a significantly higher salivary fluoride level (p < 0.001) than prone children caries (DMFT > 1). The obtained results indicated that the caries prevalence among 3-6 year-old children in Tehran - the capital of the Islamic republic of Iran - is as low compared with those, living in developed countries.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3869581PMC
December 2013