Publications by authors named "Eugen Netz"

5 Publications

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OpenPepXL: An Open-Source Tool for Sensitive Identification of Cross-Linked Peptides in XL-MS.

Mol Cell Proteomics 2020 12 16;19(12):2157-2168. Epub 2020 Oct 16.

Biomolecular Interactions, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany; Institute for Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany; Applied Bioinformatics, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany; Institute for Translational Bioinformatics, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany; Quantitative Biology Center, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany. Electronic address:

Cross-linking MS (XL-MS) has been recognized as an effective source of information about protein structures and interactions. In contrast to regular peptide identification, XL-MS has to deal with a quadratic search space, where peptides from every protein could potentially be cross-linked to any other protein. To cope with this search space, most tools apply different heuristics for search space reduction. We introduce a new open-source XL-MS database search algorithm, OpenPepXL, which offers increased sensitivity compared with other tools. OpenPepXL searches the full search space of an XL-MS experiment without using heuristics to reduce it. Because of efficient data structures and built-in parallelization OpenPepXL achieves excellent runtimes and can also be deployed on large compute clusters and cloud services while maintaining a slim memory footprint. We compared OpenPepXL to several other commonly used tools for identification of noncleavable labeled and label-free cross-linkers on a diverse set of XL-MS experiments. In our first comparison, we used a data set from a fraction of a cell lysate with a protein database of 128 targets and 128 decoys. At 5% FDR, OpenPepXL finds from 7% to over 50% more unique residue pairs (URPs) than other tools. On data sets with available high-resolution structures for cross-link validation OpenPepXL reports from 7% to over 40% more structurally validated URPs than other tools. Additionally, we used a synthetic peptide data set that allows objective validation of cross-links without relying on structural information and found that OpenPepXL reports at least 12% more validated URPs than other tools. It has been built as part of the OpenMS suite of tools and supports Windows, macOS, and Linux operating systems. OpenPepXL also supports the MzIdentML 1.2 format for XL-MS identification results. It is freely available under a three-clause BSD license at https://openms.org/openpepxl.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/mcp.TIR120.002186DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7710140PMC
December 2020

Toward Increased Reliability, Transparency, and Accessibility in Cross-linking Mass Spectrometry.

Structure 2020 11 15;28(11):1259-1268. Epub 2020 Oct 15.

University of Konstanz, Department of Biology, Universitätsstrasse 10, 78457 Konstanz, Germany; Konstanz Research School Chemical Biology, University of Konstanz, Universitätsstrasse 10, 78457 Konstanz, Germany.

Cross-linking mass spectrometry (MS) has substantially matured as a method over the past 2 decades through parallel development in multiple labs, demonstrating its applicability to protein structure determination, conformation analysis, and mapping protein interactions in complex mixtures. Cross-linking MS has become a much-appreciated and routinely applied tool, especially in structural biology. Therefore, it is timely that the community commits to the development of methodological and reporting standards. This white paper builds on an open process comprising a number of events at community conferences since 2015 and identifies aspects of Cross-linking MS for which guidelines should be developed as part of a Cross-linking MS standards initiative.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.str.2020.09.011DOI Listing
November 2020

The Phosphodiesterase Inhibitor IBMX Blocks the Potassium Channel THIK-1 from the Extracellular Side.

Mol Pharmacol 2020 08;98(2):143-155

Institute of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Marburg University, Marburg, Germany (X.Z., L.J.C., K.K., G.S., R.P.-M., J.D., V.R.); Biomolecular Interactions, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany (E.N.); and High Performance and Cloud Computing Group, IT Center, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany (J.K.)

The two-pore domain potassium channel (K-channel) THIK-1 has several predicted protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation sites. In trying to elucidate whether THIK-1 is regulated via PKA, we expressed THIK-1 channels in a mammalian cell line (CHO cells) and used the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX) as a pharmacological tool to induce activation of PKA. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp recording, we found that THIK-1 currents were inhibited by application of IBMX with an IC of 120 µM. Surprisingly, intracellular application of IBMX or of the second messenger cAMP via the patch pipette had no effect on THIK-1 currents. In contrast, extracellular application of IBMX produced a rapid and reversible inhibition of THIK-1. In patch-clamp experiments with outside-out patches, THIK-1 currents were also inhibited by extracellular application of IBMX. Expression of THIK-1 channels in oocytes was used to compare wild-type channels with mutated channels. Mutation of the putative PKA phosphorylation sites did not change the inhibitory effect of IBMX on THIK-1 currents. Mutational analysis of all residues of the (extracellular) helical cap of THIK-1 showed that mutation of the arginine residue at position 92, which is in the linker between cap helix 2 and pore helix 1, markedly reduced the inhibitory effect of IBMX. This flexible linker region, which is unique for each K-channel subtype, may be a possible target of channel-specific blockers. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: The potassium channel THIK-1 is strongly expressed in the central nervous system. We studied the effect of 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX) on THIK-1 currents. IBMX inhibits breakdown of cAMP and thus activates protein kinase A (PKA). Surprisingly, THIK-1 current was inhibited when IBMX was applied from the extracellular side of the membrane, but not from the intracellular side. Our results suggest that IBMX binds directly to the channel and that the inhibition of THIK-1 current was not related to activation of PKA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/molpharm.120.000011DOI Listing
August 2020

The mzIdentML Data Standard Version 1.2, Supporting Advances in Proteome Informatics.

Mol Cell Proteomics 2017 07 17;16(7):1275-1285. Epub 2017 May 17.

¶Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 7ZB, UK;

The first stable version of the Proteomics Standards Initiative mzIdentML open data standard (version 1.1) was published in 2012-capturing the outputs of peptide and protein identification software. In the intervening years, the standard has become well-supported in both commercial and open software, as well as a submission and download format for public repositories. Here we report a new release of mzIdentML (version 1.2) that is required to keep pace with emerging practice in proteome informatics. New features have been added to support: (1) scores associated with localization of modifications on peptides; (2) statistics performed at the level of peptides; (3) identification of cross-linked peptides; and (4) support for proteogenomics approaches. In addition, there is now improved support for the encoding of sequencing of peptides, spectral library searches, and protein inference. As a key point, the underlying XML schema has only undergone very minor modifications to simplify as much as possible the transition from version 1.1 to version 1.2 for implementers, but there have been several notable updates to the format specification, implementation guidelines, controlled vocabularies and validation software. mzIdentML 1.2 can be described as backwards compatible, in that reading software designed for mzIdentML 1.1 should function in most cases without adaptation. We anticipate that these developments will provide a continued stable base for software teams working to implement the standard. All the related documentation is accessible at http://www.psidev.info/mzidentml.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/mcp.M117.068429DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5500760PMC
July 2017

JSBML 1.0: providing a smorgasbord of options to encode systems biology models.

Bioinformatics 2015 Oct 16;31(20):3383-6. Epub 2015 Jun 16.

University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA, Center for Bioinformatics Tuebingen (ZBIT), University of Tuebingen, Tübingen, Germany.

Unlabelled: JSBML, the official pure Java programming library for the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) format, has evolved with the advent of different modeling formalisms in systems biology and their ability to be exchanged and represented via extensions of SBML. JSBML has matured into a major, active open-source project with contributions from a growing, international team of developers who not only maintain compatibility with SBML, but also drive steady improvements to the Java interface and promote ease-of-use with end users.

Availability And Implementation: Source code, binaries and documentation for JSBML can be freely obtained under the terms of the LGPL 2.1 from the website http://sbml.org/Software/JSBML. More information about JSBML can be found in the user guide at http://sbml.org/Software/JSBML/docs/.

Contact: jsbml-development@googlegroups.com or andraeger@eng.ucsd.edu

Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bioinformatics/btv341DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4595895PMC
October 2015