Publications by authors named "Emma J Aarons"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Seoul Virus Associated with Pet Rats, Scotland, UK, 2019.

Emerg Infect Dis 2021 ;27(10):2677-2680

We describe a case of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome caused by Seoul virus in a woman in Scotland, UK. Whole-genome sequencing showed the virus belonged to a lineage characterized by recent international expansion, probably driven by trade in pet rats.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2710.211298DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8462346PMC
October 2021

Presence and Persistence of Zika Virus RNA in Semen, United Kingdom, 2016.

Emerg Infect Dis 2017 04 15;23(4):611-615. Epub 2017 Apr 15.

Zika virus RNA has been detected in semen collected several months after onset of symptoms of infection. Given the potential for sexual transmission of Zika virus and for serious fetal abnormalities resulting from infection during pregnancy, information regarding the persistence of Zika virus in semen is critical for advancing our understanding of potential risks. We tested serial semen samples from symptomatic male patients in the United Kingdom who had a diagnosis of imported Zika virus infection. Among the initial semen samples from 23 patients, Zika virus RNA was detected at high levels in 13 (56.5%) and was not detected in 9 (39.1%); detection was indeterminate in 1 sample (4.4%). After symptomatic infection, a substantial proportion of men have detectable Zika virus RNA at high copy numbers in semen during early convalescence, suggesting high risk for sexual transmission. Viral RNA clearance times are not consistent and can be prolonged.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2304.161692DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5367426PMC
April 2017

Zika virus.

BMJ 2016 Feb 26;352:i1049. Epub 2016 Feb 26.

Department of Infectious Diseases, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London NW3 2QG, UK

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.i1049DOI Listing
February 2016

A non-fatal case of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome imported into the UK (ex Panama), July 2014.

J Clin Virol 2015 Jun 8;67:52-5. Epub 2015 Apr 8.

Research Department, Microbiology Services Division, Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury, United Kingdom; National Institute for Health Research, Health Protection Research Unit in Emerging and Zoonotic Infections, Liverpool, United Kingdom.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2015.04.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4451477PMC
June 2015

Patient characteristics and severity of human rhinovirus infections in children.

J Clin Virol 2013 Sep 22;58(1):216-20. Epub 2013 Jul 22.

Department of Infectious Diseases, King's College London School of Medicine, London, UK.

Background: It is increasingly recognized that human rhinoviruses (HRV) can be associated with severe infections. However, conflicting results have been reported on the relative prevalence and severity of the three HRV species.

Objectives: The relative prevalence and clinical characteristics of HRV-A, B and C, in children attending a South London teaching hospital were investigated retrospectively.

Study Design: Children aged<16 years with episodes of respiratory tract infections and detectable entero/rhinovirus RNA in respiratory samples between November 2009 and December 2010 were investigated. Retrospective case review was performed and patients' characteristics recorded.

Results: Entero/rhinoviruses were the commonest viral pathogens (498/2316; 21.5%). Amongst 204 infection episodes associated with entero/rhinovirus, 167 were typed HRV, HRV-C was the most prevalent (99/167, 59.3%) followed by HRV-A (60/167; 35.9%) and HRV-B (8/167, 4.8%). The severity spectrum of HRV-A and HRV-C infections were similar and affected all parts of the respiratory tract. Co-pathogens were observed in 54 (26.5%) episodes. Severity was increased in patients with non-viral co-pathogens and those with an underlying respiratory condition. Univariate and multiple regression analyses of potential prognostic variables including age, co-pathogens and underlying respiratory illnesses showed that mono-infection with HRV-C, as compared with other HRV species, was associated with more severe disease in young children<3 years.

Conclusions: HRV-C was the most prevalent species and on its own was associated with severe disease in children<3 years. The association between infection with HRV species and clinical presentation is complex and affected by many confounding factors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2013.06.042DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7108361PMC
September 2013

Lineages, sub-lineages and variants of enterovirus 68 in recent outbreaks.

PLoS One 2012 20;7(4):e36005. Epub 2012 Apr 20.

Department of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.

Enterovirus 68 (EV68) was first isolated in 1962. Very few cases of EV68 infection were described over the ensuing 40 years. However, in the past few years, an increase in severe respiratory tract infections associated with EV68 has been reported. We identified two clusters of EV68 infection in South London, UK, one each in the autumn/winters of 2009 and 2010. Sequence comparison showed significant homology of the UK strains with those from other countries including the Netherlands, Japan and the Philippines, which reported EV68 outbreaks between 2008 and 2010. Phylogenetic analysis of all available VP1 sequences indicated the presence of two modern EV68 lineages. The 2010 UK strains belonged to lineage 2. Lineage 1 could be further divided into two sub-lineages: some Japanese and Dutch strains collected between 2004 and 2010 form a distinct sub-lineages (sub-lineage 1.1), whereas other strains from the UK, Japan, Netherlands and Philippines collected between 2008 and 2010 represent sub-lineage 1.2. The UK 2009 strains together with several Dutch and Japanese strains from 2009/2010 represents one variant (1.2.1), whereas those from the Philippines a second variant (1.2.2). Based on specific deletions and substitutions, we suggest rules for the assignment of lineages and sub-lineages. Molecular epidemiological analysis indicates rapid recent evolution of EV68 and this may explain the recent findings of a global resurgence of EV68. Continuous global monitoring of the clinical and molecular epidemiology of EV68 is recommended.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0036005PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3335014PMC
August 2012
-->