Publications by authors named "Edward Ebani"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Imaging Glioblastoma Posttreatment: Progression, Pseudoprogression, Pseudoresponse, Radiation Necrosis.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2021 Feb;31(1):103-120

Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical Center, 525 East 68th Street, Box 141, New York, NY 10065, USA. Electronic address:

Radiographic monitoring of posttreatment glioblastoma is important for clinical trials and determining next steps in management. Evaluation for tumor progression is confounded by the presence of treatment-related radiographic changes, making a definitive determination less straight-forward. The purpose of this article was to describe imaging tools available for assessing treatment response in glioblastoma, as well as to highlight the definitions, pathophysiology, and imaging features typical of true progression, pseudoprogression, pseudoresponse, and radiation necrosis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2020.09.010DOI Listing
February 2021

Improved targeting of the globus pallidus interna using quantitative susceptibility mapping prior to MR-guided focused ultrasound ablation in Parkinson's disease.

Clin Imaging 2020 Dec 15;68:94-98. Epub 2020 Jun 15.

Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address:

Purpose: Magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) of the globus pallidus interna (GPi) has shown promise in the treatment of drug-resistant Parkinson's disease, though direct visualization of the GPi remains challenging with MRI. The purpose of this study was to compare various preoperative MR imaging techniques and to evaluate the utility of quantitative susceptibility imaging (QSM) in the depiction of the GPi prior to MRgFUS ablation.

Materials And Methods: Six patients with medication refractory advanced idiopathic Parkinson's disease were referred for preoperative MR imaging prior to MRgFUS pallidotomy. Axial T1WI and T2WI, Fast Gray Matter Acquisition T1 Inversion Recovery (FGATIR), and QSM sequences were acquired. DTI tractography was performed to delineate the corticospinal tracts. Qualitative visualization scores and contrast to noise ratios (CNR) were recorded and measured on all images.

Results: QSM had significantly higher median qualitative visualization scores (3.00) compared with the T1WI (1.00), T2WI (1.50), and FGATIR sequences (1.50) (p < 0.05). QSM provided superior CNR for GPi depiction in each category (GPi-GPe and GPi-IC), respectively. For GPi-GPe, median CNR for T1WI, T2WI, FGATIR, and QSM was 1.13, 1.68, 0.79, and 10.78. For GPi-IC, median CNR for T1WI, T2WI, FGATIR, and QSM was 1.48, 4.63, 4.24, and 40.26, respectively (p < 0.05).

Conclusion: QSM offers improved visualization of the GPi compared with the traditional and currently recommended MR sequences prior to MRgFUS ablation in patients with Parkinson's disease. These results suggest that QSM should be considered as part of all preoperative imaging protocols prior to MRgFUS pallidotomy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinimag.2020.06.017DOI Listing
December 2020

Imaging Glioblastoma Posttreatment: Progression, Pseudoprogression, Pseudoresponse, Radiation Necrosis.

Radiol Clin North Am 2019 Nov 16;57(6):1199-1216. Epub 2019 Aug 16.

Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical Center, 525 East 68th Street, Box 141, New York, NY 10065, USA. Electronic address:

Radiographic monitoring of posttreatment glioblastoma is important for clinical trials and determining next steps in management. Evaluation for tumor progression is confounded by the presence of treatment-related radiographic changes, making a definitive determination less straight-forward. The purpose of this article was to describe imaging tools available for assessing treatment response in glioblastoma, as well as to highlight the definitions, pathophysiology, and imaging features typical of true progression, pseudoprogression, pseudoresponse, and radiation necrosis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rcl.2019.07.003DOI Listing
November 2019

Trends in retinopathy of prematurity over a 5-year period in a racially diverse population.

Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina 2014 Mar-Apr;45(2):138-42

Background And Objective: Retinopathy of prematurity presents differently in developing versus developed countries, which may be due to environmental as well as racial differences.

Patients And Methods: Retrospective chart review of infants screened for ROP at a single neonatal intensive care unit. Risk factors were reviewed. Main outcome measures were rates of plus disease or treatment-requiring ROP by race.

Results: The study included 497 infants screened for ROP in an urban neonatal intensive care unit. Gestational age, birth weight, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia were independent risk factors for both plus disease and treatment-requiring ROP with type 3 multivariate analysis. Self-identified white race was also a risk factor for plus disease and treatment-requiring ROP. Race was significantly associated with maternal age, multiple births, and blood transfusions.

Conclusion: In the study population, white race was an independent risk factor for plus disease and ROP treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/23258160-20140306-07DOI Listing
September 2014

Patent ductus arteriosus and indomethacin treatment as independent risk factors for plus disease in retinopathy of prematurity.

J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus 2013 Mar-Apr;50(2):88-92. Epub 2013 Jan 15.

Department of Ophthalmology, Montefiore Medical Center; Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.

Purpose: To examine whether clinically significant patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) or indomethacin treatment are associated with plus disease or retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) requiring treatment.

Methods: Retrospective, cross-sectional study. Charts were reviewed for gestational age, birth weight, birth head circumference, birth length, maternal characteristics, gender, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, neurologic comorbidities, PDA and its treatments, gastrointestinal comorbidities, blood transfusions, and sepsis. Main outcome measures were increased rates of plus disease or ROP requiring treatment.

Results: A total of 450 premature infants screened for ROP in a mid-sized, urban neonatal intensive care unit were included. On univariate analysis, gestational age, birth weight, birth head circumference, birth length, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, neurologic comorbidities, PDA and its treatments, gastrointestinal comorbidities, and sepsis were significantly correlated to plus disease and ROP requiring treatment. PDA was significantly associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, neurologic comorbidities, sepsis, and blood transfusions (P < .0001). With type 3 multivariate analysis, only gestational age and bronchopulmonary dysplasia were independent risk factors for ROP.

Conclusion: PDA and indomethacin were associated with plus disease and ROP requiring treatment on univariate analysis but this was not significant after adjusting for other risk factors. PDA was also strongly related to bronchopulmonary dysplasia and blood transfusions, which may explain its effect on ROP.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/01913913-20130108-03DOI Listing
December 2013