Publications by authors named "E Aadland"

170 Publications

Influence of adiposity and physical activity on the cardiometabolic association pattern of lipoprotein subclasses to aerobic fitness in prepubertal children.

PLoS One 2021 18;16(11):e0259901. Epub 2021 Nov 18.

Department of Chemistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.

Aerobic fitness (AF) and lipoprotein subclasses associate to each other and to cardiovascular health. Adiposity and physical activity (PA) influence the association pattern of AF to lipoproteins almost inversely making it difficult to assess their independent and joint influence on the association pattern. This study, including 841 children (50% boys) 10.2 ± 0.3 years old with BMI 18.0 ± 3.0 kg/m2 from rural Western Norway, aimed at examining the association pattern of AF to the lipoprotein subclasses and to estimate the independent and joint influence of PA and adiposity on this pattern. We used multivariate analysis to determine the association pattern of a profile of 26 lipoprotein features to AF with and without adjustment for three measures of adiposity and a high-resolution PA descriptor of 23 intensity intervals derived from accelerometry. For data not adjusted for adiposity or PA, we observed a cardioprotective lipoprotein pattern associating to AF. This pattern withstood adjustment for PA, but the strength of association to AF was reduced by 58%, while adjustment for adiposity weakened the association of AF to the lipoproteins by 85% and with strongest changes in the associations to a cardioprotective high-density lipoprotein subclass pattern. When adjusted for both adiposity and PA, the cardioprotective lipoprotein pattern still associated to AF, but the strength of association was reduced by 90%. Our results imply that the (negative) influence of adiposity on the cardioprotective association pattern of lipoproteins to AF is considerably stronger than the (positive) contribution of PA to this pattern. However, our analysis shows that PA contributes also indirectly through a strong inverse association to adiposity. The trial was registered 7 May, 2014 in clinicaltrials.gov with trial reg. no.: NCT02132494 and the URL is https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=NCT02132494&cntry=NO.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0259901PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8601570PMC
November 2021

The role of weather conditions on time spent outdoors and in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity among Norwegian preschoolers.

J Sports Sci 2021 Sep 20:1-8. Epub 2021 Sep 20.

Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Education, Arts and Sports, Department of Sport, Food and Natural Sciences, Campus Sogndal, Norway.

The aim of this study was to determine associations between weather and playground surface conditions and time spent outdoors and in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) in preschool children aged 3-6 years. We included 1201 children (mean age 4.8 years, 51% boys) from 68 preschools in Norway who provided 12,030 days of observation during 2015-2016. Preschool MVPA was measured by accelerometry (ActiGraph GT3X+) for 10 consecutive weekdays. During this period, outdoor time and playground surface conditions were logged by staff and weather conditions were obtained from the Norwegian Meteorological Institute. Associations were determined using linear mixed models. Associations for MVPA depended on whether the analyses were adjusted for outdoor time or not. In unadjusted analyses, rainfall, wind, and wet, icy, and mixed playground conditions were negatively associated with MVPA, while temperature, snowfall, and dry playground conditions were positively associated with MVPA. In adjusted analyses, temperature and wet and mixed playground conditions were negatively associated with MVPA, while snowfall and dry and snowy playground conditions were positively associated with MVPA. Outdoor time and MVPA should be addressed simultaneously to inform interpretation of associations with weather characteristics and intervention development in early childhood education settings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2021.1976490DOI Listing
September 2021

Bi-directional prospective associations between sedentary time, physical activity and adiposity in 10-year old Norwegian children.

J Sports Sci 2021 Aug 30;39(15):1772-1779. Epub 2021 Mar 30.

Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.

There is an adverse cross-sectional association between sedentary time, physical activity (PA) and adiposity, but weak and inconsistent estimates raise question to the direction of associations. The present study aims to examine whether the prospective association between sedentary time, different PA intensities and indicators of adiposity is bi-directional. The Active Smarter Kids Study obtained data from 869 ten-year-old children with valid measurements for sedentary time, PA, and adiposity at baseline and follow-up. Time spent sedentary and PA was measured by accelerometry, adiposity was assessed by three different measures: body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and sum of four skinfolds (S4SF). Neither overall PA nor time spent sedentary predicted lower BMI or WC at follow-up, but the time spent in moderate-and-vigorous PA (MVPA) and vigorous PA (VPA) predicted lower S4SF at follow-up among boys (MVPA  - 0.066 [95% CI -0.105, -0.027]  = 0.001). Baseline BMI and WC predicted less overall PA, MVPA and VPA in boys. All adiposity measures predicted more time spent sedentary at follow-up in boys. The results suggest that overall PA and sedentary time do not predict future adiposity. Baseline adiposity may rather predict more sedentary time and less higher intensity activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2021.1898114DOI Listing
August 2021

Cardiometabolic Associations between Physical Activity, Adiposity, and Lipoprotein Subclasses in Prepubertal Norwegian Children.

Nutrients 2021 Jun 19;13(6). Epub 2021 Jun 19.

Department of Chemistry, University of Bergen, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.

Lipoprotein subclasses possess crucial cardiometabolic information. Due to strong multicollinearity among variables, little is known about the strength of influence of physical activity (PA) and adiposity upon this cardiometabolic pattern. Using a novel approach to adjust for covariates, we aimed at determining the "net" patterns and strength for PA and adiposity to the lipoprotein profile. Principal component and multivariate pattern analysis were used for the analysis of 841 prepubertal children characterized by 26 lipoprotein features determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a high-resolution PA descriptor derived from accelerometry, and three adiposity measures: body mass index, waist circumference to height, and skinfold thickness. Our approach focuses on revealing and validating the underlying predictive association patterns in the metabolic, anthropologic, and PA data to acknowledge the inherent multicollinear nature of such data. PA associates to a favorable cardiometabolic pattern of increased high-density lipoproteins (HDL), very large and large HDL particles, and large size of HDL particles, and decreasedtriglyceride, chylomicrons, very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), and their subclasses, and to low size of VLDL particles. Although weakened in strength, this pattern resists adjustment for adiposity. Adiposity is inversely associated to this pattern and exhibits unfavorable associations to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) features, including atherogenic small and very small LDL particles. The observed associations are still strong after adjustment for PA. Thus, lipoproteins explain 26.0% in adiposity after adjustment for PA compared to 2.3% in PA after adjustment for adiposity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu13062095DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8234367PMC
June 2021

Resemblance in Physical Activity in Families with Children in Time Segments during the Week: The Lolland-Falster Health Study.

Med Sci Sports Exerc 2021 11;53(11):2283-2289

Lolland-Falster Health Study, Centre for Epidemiological Research, Nykøbing F. Hospital, Nykøbing, DENMARK.

Purpose: Evidence of shared physical activity (PA) habits within families is inconsistent. The present study aimed at examining intrafamily resemblance in PA during different time segments of the week.

Method: This cross-sectional study used data from the Danish household-based population study Lolland-Falster Health Study. We assessed time spent in various PA intensities and behaviors using a dual-accelerometer system (Axivity AX3). At least one parent and one child per household provided data for a minimum of three weekdays and one weekend day. We analyzed three time segments: early weekdays, late weekdays, and weekends. A linear mixed model regression analysis was used to estimate intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) of the total family, parent-child dyads, siblings, and parent-parent dyads for PA outcomes, adjusting for sex, age, parental education, and the interaction between sex and age.

Results: We included 774 parents (57.9% female, 42.8 ± 7 yr) and 802 children (54.2% girls, 11.1 ± 4.3 yr) nested within 523 families. The clustering among the total family was stronger during late weekdays (ICC = 0.11-0.31) and weekends (ICC = 0.14-0.29) than during early weekdays (ICC = 0.02-0.19). We found stronger clustering among siblings (ICC = 0.08-0.47) and between parents (ICC = 0.02-0.52) than between parents and children (ICC < 0.01-0.37). Generally, the clustering was strongest for light PA, and among PA behaviors, walking showed the highest resemblance across all subgroups.

Conclusion: Initiatives to promote children's PA that involve parent or sibling coparticipation may focus on the time segment and activity types with the highest resemblance. For the family as a whole, promoting walking or limiting sedentary activities may be a potential target for interventions during late weekdays and weekends.Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02482896).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0000000000002718DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8542089PMC
November 2021
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