Publications by authors named "Dorit H Aaron"

5 Publications

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Drawing inspiration from children.

J Hand Ther 2015 Apr-Jun;28(2):89-90. Epub 2015 Jan 22.

Division of Biokinesiology & Physical Therapy, Ostrow School of Dentistry and Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 1540 Alcazar St., CHP 155, Los Angeles CA 90089-9006, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jht.2015.01.006DOI Listing
February 2016

Innovative evaluation of dexterity in pediatrics.

J Hand Ther 2015 Apr-Jun;28(2):144-9; quiz 150. Epub 2015 Jan 22.

University of Southern California, Biomedical Engineering Department and Division of Biokinesiology & Physical Therapy, 3710 S. McClintock, RTH 402, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA.

Study Design: Review paper.

Introduction: Hand dexterity is multifaceted and essential to the performance of daily tasks. Timed performance and precision demands are the most common features of quantitative dexterity testing. Measurement concepts such as rate of completion, in-hand manipulation and dynamic force control of instabilities are being integrated into assessment tools for the pediatric population.

Purpose: To review measurement concepts inherent in pediatric dexterity testing and introduce concepts that are infrequently measured or novel as exemplified with two assessment tools.

Methods: Measurement concepts included in common assessment tools are introduced first. We then describe seldom measured and novel concepts embedded in two instruments; the Functional Dexterity Test (FDT) and the Strength-Dexterity (SD) Test.

Discussion: The inclusion of novel yet informative tools and measurement concepts in our assessments could aid our understanding of atypical dexterity, and potentially contribute to the design of targeted therapy programs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jht.2015.01.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4424153PMC
February 2016

Perspectives on glenohumeral joint contractures and shoulder dysfunction in children with perinatal brachial plexus palsy.

J Hand Ther 2015 Apr-Jun;28(2):176-83; quiz 184. Epub 2014 Dec 18.

Shriners Hospitals for Children, Philadelphia, 3551 N. Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA.

Shoulder joint deformities continue to be a challenging aspect of treating upper plexus lesions in children with perinatal brachial plexus palsy (PBPP). It is increasingly recognized that PBPP affects the glenohumeral joint specifically, and that abnormal scapulothoracic movements are a compensatory development. The pathophysiology and assessment of glenohumeral joint contractures, the progression of scapular dyskinesia and skeletal dysplasia, and current shoulder imaging techniques are reviewed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jht.2014.12.001DOI Listing
February 2016

Measuring normal hand dexterity values in normal 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old children and their relationship with grip and pinch strength.

J Hand Ther 2003 Jan-Mar;16(1):22-8

Division of Plastic Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.

After surgery for trauma or correction of congenital anomaly, hand function is difficult to evaluate in children because there are no reference norms on children 3 to 5 years old. The purpose of this study was to determine whether reproducible normative values for hand dexterity and grip and pinch strength could be obtained in young children using simple tests that could be administered quickly within the attention span of a 3- to 5-year-old. The Functional Dexterity Test (FDT), a pegboard test validated for adults and older children, seemed to meet our requirements for dexterity. The FDT was administered to a convenience sample of normal children in a prekindergarten school who were grouped according to age: 3-year-olds (n = 17), 4-year-olds (n = 24), and 5-year-olds (n = 22). Hand dominance was determined. The task was demonstrated by 1 of the 2 testers. The child was asked to turn the pegs over in the pegboard without using the free hand or balancing the peg against the chest. Both hands were tested. Grip and pinch strengths were measured in both hands in a consistent manner. All the children were tested with the arm at the side and the elbow at 90 degrees. A dynamometer was used for grip strength and a pinch meter was used to measure key (lateral) and tripod pinch strengths. Means and SDs were calculated for each age group, and the dependent values of dexterity, strength, and dominance were correlated. Dexterity and strength scores were significantly different by age group. A good FDT score in the dominant hand was predictive of a good score in the nondominant hand. Grip and pinch strength correlated poorly with functional dexterity. The normative values established in this study for children in the 3- to 5-year-old range can be referenced for disability estimates and establishing goals for children after surgery or hand injury.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0894-1130(03)80020-0DOI Listing
May 2003

Development of the Functional Dexterity Test (FDT): construction, validity, reliability, and normative data.

J Hand Ther 2003 Jan-Mar;16(1):12-21

Functional Hand Therapy Alliance, Inc. Houston, Texas, USA.

Dexterity tests take time to administer; however, the information obtained is an important component of a comprehensive examination of the hand. This article introduces a dexterity test suitable for use as part of routine examination of the hand. The Functional Dexterity Test (FDT) was developed as a measure of dexterity that takes a minimum amount of time to administer, yet provides information regarding the patient's ability to use the hand for daily tasks requiring a 3-jaw chuck prehension between the fingers and the thumb. The test was developed over 20 years. Interrater and intrarater reliability ranges between good and excellent. Construct validity was confirmed in 2 clinical studies. Preliminary normative data were obtained in 6 samples of convenience. Along with statistical data, this article provides equipment standards and instructions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0894-1130(03)80019-4DOI Listing
May 2003
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