Publications by authors named "Dongyue Liu"

6 Publications

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Deficiency for Lcn8 causes epididymal sperm maturation defects in mice.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2021 Apr 22;548:7-13. Epub 2021 Feb 22.

School of Life Science and Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Experimental Teratology, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100, PR China. Electronic address:

Lipocalin family members, LCN8 and LCN9, are specifically expressed in the initial segment of mouse caput epididymis. However, the biological functions of the molecules in vivo are yet to be clarified. In this study, CRISPR/Cas9 technology was used to generate Lcn8 and Lcn9 knockout mice, respectively. Lcn8 and Lcn9 male mice showed normal spermatogenesis and fertility. In the cauda epididymis of Lcn8 male mice, morphologically abnormal sperm was increased significantly, the proportion of progressive motility sperm was decreased, the proportion of immobilized sperm was elevated, and the sperm spontaneous acrosome reaction (AR) frequency was increased. Conversely, the knockout of Lcn9 did not have any effect on the ratio of morphologically abnormal sperm, sperm motility, and sperm spontaneous AR frequencies. These results demonstrated the role of LCN8 in maintaining the sperm quality in the epididymis, and suggested that the deficiency of LCN8 leads to epididymal sperm maturation defects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrc.2021.02.052DOI Listing
April 2021

Cdc14a has a role in spermatogenesis, sperm maturation and male fertility.

Exp Cell Res 2020 10 15;395(1):112178. Epub 2020 Jul 15.

School of Life Science and Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Experimental Teratology, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100, PR China. Electronic address:

Cdc14a is an evolutionarily conserved dual-specific protein phosphatase, and it plays different roles in different organisms. Cdc14a mutations in human have been reported to cause male infertility, while the specific role of Cdc14a in regulation of the male reproductive system remains elusive. In the present study, we established a knockout mouse model to study the function of Cdc14a in male reproductive system. Cdc14a male mice were subfertile and they could only produce very few offspring. The number of sperm was decreased, the sperm motility was impaired, and the proportion of sperm with abnormal morphology was elevated in Cdc14a mice. When we mated Cdc14a male mice with wild-type (WT) female mice, fertilized eggs could be found in female fallopian tubes, however, the majority of these embryos died during development. Some empty spaces were observed in seminiferous tubule of Cdc14a testes. Compared with WT male mice, the proportions of pachytene spermatocytes were increased and germ cells stained with γH2ax were decreased in Cdc14a male mice, indicating that knockout of Cdc14a inhibited meiotic initiation. Subsequently, we analyzed the expression levels of some substrate proteins of Cdc14a, including Cdc25a, Wee1, and PR-Set7, and compared those with WT testes, in which the expression levels of these proteins were significantly increased in Cdc14a testes. Our results revealed that Cdc14a male mice are highly subfertile, and Cdc14a is essential for normal spermatogenesis and sperm function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yexcr.2020.112178DOI Listing
October 2020

The relationship between post traumatic stress disorder and post traumatic growth: gender differences in PTG and PTSD subgroups.

Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol 2014 Dec 30;49(12):1903-10. Epub 2014 Mar 30.

College of Teacher Education, Sichuan Normal University, No. 5, Jingan Road, Jinjiang District, Chengdu, 610068, Sichuan, People's Republic of China,

Purpose: This study investigated the post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and post traumatic growth (PTG) in 2,300 earthquake survivors 1 year after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between PTSD and PTG and also tested for the gender differences in PTSD and PTG subgroups.

Methods: A stratification random sampling strategy and questionnaires were used to collect the data. The PTSD was assessed using the PTSD Check list-Civilian and the PTG was assessed using the Post traumatic growth inventory. 2,300 individuals were involved in the initial survey with 2,080 completing the final questionnaire, a response rate of 90.4%. One-way ANOVA analyses were performed to investigate the gender differences in the PTSD and PTG subgroups.

Results: One year following the earthquake, 40.1 and 51.1% of survivors reported PTSD and PTG, respectively. A bivariate correlation analysis indicated that there was a positive association between PTG and PTSD. The PTG and PTSD variance analysis conducted on female and male subgroups suggested that women were more affected than men.

Conclusions: Given the relatively high PTG prevalence, it was concluded that researchers need to pay more attention to the positive outcomes of an earthquake rather than just focusing on the negative effects. The surveys and analyses indicated that psychological intervention and care for the earthquake disaster survivors should focus more on females and older people, who tend to be more adversely affected.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00127-014-0865-5DOI Listing
December 2014

Posttraumatic stress disorder and posttraumatic growth among adult survivors of Wenchuan earthquake after 1 year: prevalence and correlates.

Arch Psychiatr Nurs 2014 Feb 11;28(1):67-73. Epub 2013 Nov 11.

College of Teacher Education, Sichuan Normal University. No. 5, Jingan Road, Jinjiang District, Chengdu, Sichuan 610068, P. R. China. Electronic address:

This study investigates the prevalence and predictors for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and posttraumatic growth (PTG) in adult survivors 1year after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Questionnaires were used to collect the data. PTSD was assessed using the PTSD Check List-Civilian (PCL-C), and PTG was assessed using the Post Traumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI). A total of 2,300 individuals were involved in the survey with 2,080 completing the questionnaire, a response rate of 90.4%. The PTSD prevalence estimate in this study was found to be 40.1%, and the prevalence for PTG among the participants was measured at 51.1%. A bivariate correlation analysis indicated that there was a positive association between PTG and PTSD. In the conclusions, possible explanations for the findings and implications for future research are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apnu.2013.10.010DOI Listing
February 2014

Superoxide dismutase induces G1-phase cell cycle arrest by down-regulated expression of Cdk-2 and cyclin-E in murine sarcoma S180 tumor cells.

Cell Biochem Funct 2013 Jun 11;31(4):352-9. Epub 2012 Oct 11.

Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, Ministry of Education, Institute of Food Engineering and Biotechnology, Tianjin, China.

As an efficient reactive oxygen species-scavenging enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD) has been shown to inhibit tumor growth and interfere with motility and invasiveness of cancer cells. In this study, the molecular mechanisms of cell cycle arrest when S180 tumor cells were exposed to high levels of SOD were investigated. Here, both murine sarcoma S180 tumor cells and NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblasts were respectively treated with varying concentrations of Cu/Zn-SOD for 24, 48 and 72 h to determine optimal dose of SOD, which was a concentration of 800 U/ml SOD for 48 h. It is found that SOD induced S180 cell cycle arrest at G1-phase with decreasing level of superoxide production, whereas SOD had less effect on proliferation of NIH-3T3 cells. Moreover, the expression rate of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) in S180 tumor cells was suppressed after SOD treatment, which indicated the inhibition of DNA synthesis in S180 cells. Besides, there were significant down-regulations of cyclin-E and Cdk-2 in S180 cells after SOD treatment, which contributed to the blockage of G1/S transition in S180 cell cycle. Together, our data confirmed that SOD could notably inhibit proliferation of S180 tumor cell and induce cell cycle arrest at G1-phase by down-regulating expressions of cyclin-E and Cdk-2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cbf.2912DOI Listing
June 2013

Up regulation of annexin A2 on murine H22 hepatocarcinoma cells induced by cartilage polysaccharide.

Cancer Epidemiol 2011 Oct 25;35(5):490-6. Epub 2010 Nov 25.

Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, Ministry of Education, College of Food Engineering and Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin, China.

In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of a tumor vaccine prepared from H22 hepatocarcinoma cells induced by cartilage polysaccharide. We found out there were specific antigens which combined with antigen-specific antibodies from immune murine serum. Results of western blot analysis showed that about 36 kDa make specific antibodies appeared specific antibodies in antiserum of immune mice, whereas the best immune effects became visible at the induction time of 48 h. Analyses of 2-dimensional electrophoresis identified the specific antigen was annexin A2, which was a glycosylated protein that contained a glycosylation site, closely related to oncogenesis, cancer development, invasion and metastasis. Proteomics indicated that both quantity and conformation of annexin A2 were changed after induced by cartilage polysaccharide. Lastly, we found there was a major increase of annexin A2 mRNA on H22 cells induced by cartilage polysaccharide. In summary, our data suggested that annexin A2, a specific antigen played a key role in antitumor immune response and activating the immune system. It would be a potential type of tumor vaccine which provided new ideas for tumor immunoprophylaxis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2010.10.004DOI Listing
October 2011