Publications by authors named "Diederik Aarendonk"

19 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Universal health coverage and primary health care: the 30 by 2030 campaign.

Bull World Health Organ 2020 Nov 5;98(11):812-814. Epub 2020 Oct 5.

Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, U.Z.-Building 6 K3, Corneel Heymanslaan, 10, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2471/BLT.19.245670DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7607468PMC
November 2020

The establishment and functioning of the PRIMORE (European PRImary care MultiprOfessional REsearcher network) Project.

Prim Health Care Res Dev 2019 07 16;20:e114. Epub 2019 Jul 16.

European Forum for Primary Care, Utretch, The Netherlands.

There is a need for multiprofessional comprehensive studies to better understand the relationship between design and provision of primary care and long-term care and health outcomes. The PRIMORE (PRImary care MultiprOfessional REsearcher network) project aims at bringing together researchers with different backgrounds and from a wide range of professional groups within the fields of primary care research and long-term care research to develop and share knowledge for the benefit of research on municipal health and care services, and eventually, the quality of municipal health and care in Europe. Main activities of the project will be network development, capacity building, providing a platform where multiprofessional primary care research activities can take place and publishing position papers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1463423619000276DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6635802PMC
July 2019

Palliative care in primary care: European Forum for Primary Care position paper.

Prim Health Care Res Dev 2019 09 18;20:e133. Epub 2019 Sep 18.

St Columba's Hospice Professor of Primary Palliative Care, University of Edinburgh and Co-Chair, European Association of Palliative Care Primary Care Reference Group, Emeritus Professor of Primary Palliative Care, University of Edinburgh,Edinburgh, Scotland.

Aim: The aim of this position paper is to assist primary health care (PHC) providers, policymakers, and researchers by discussing the current context in which palliative health care functions within PHC in Europe. The position paper gives examples for improvements to palliative care models from studies and international discussions at European Forum for Primary Care (EFPC) workshops and conferences.

Background: Palliative care is a holistic approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing problems associated with terminal illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and diligent assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, whether physical, psychosocial, or spiritual. Unfortunately, some Europeans, unless they have cancer, still do not have access to generalist or specialist palliative care.

Methods: A draft of this position paper was distributed electronically through the EFPC network in 2015, 2016, and 2017. Active collaboration with the representatives of the International Primary Palliative Care Network was established from the very beginning and more recently with the EAPC Primary Care Reference Group. Barriers, opportunities, and examples of good and bad practices were discussed at workshops focusing on palliative care at the international conferences of Southeastern European countries in Ljubljana (2015) and Budva (2017), at regular conferences in Amsterdam (2015) and Riga (2016), at the WONCA Europe conferences in Istanbul (2015), Copenhagen (2016), and Prague (2017), and at the EAPC conference in Madrid (2017).

Findings: There is great diversity in the extent and type of palliative care provided in primary care by European countries. Primary care teams (PCTs) are well placed to encourage timely palliative care. We collected examples from different countries. We found numerous barriers influencing PCTs in preparing care plans with patients. We identified many facilitators to improve the organization of palliative care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1463423619000641DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6764185PMC
September 2019

[Primary care of refugees and migrants. Lesson learnt from the EUR-HUMAN project].

Orv Hetil 2018 Sep;159(35):1414-1422

Clinic of Social and Family Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Crete Greece.

In 2015, local wars, starvation and misery in some Middle Eastern, Asian and African countries forced millions of people to leave their homelands. Many of these people migrated toward Europe, reaching Hungary as well. The refugee crisis created significant challenges for all national healthcare systems across Europe. Limited attention has been given to the extent to which health service provision for refugees and migrants has become a task for primary health care (PHC), which has been unprepared as a profession and pressured by the enormous workload. Hungarian primary care was involved only to an extent in the refugees' health care, as most of the migrants entering Hungary wanted to move forward to other countries. The need for evidence-based patient-centred interventions to assess refugee healthcare needs, and for training programmes for rapid capacity-building for integrated PHC was addressed by the EUropean Refugees - HUman Movement and Advisory Network (EUR-HUMAN) project, which 7 European countries developed together. The overall aim of the EUR-HUMAN project is to enhance the knowledge and expertise of European member states who accept refugees and migrants in addressing their health needs, safeguarding them from risks, while at the same time to minimize cross-border health risks. This initiative focuses on addressing the early arrival period, transition and longer-term settlement of refugees in European host countries. A primary objective of this project is to identify, design and assess interventions to improve PHC delivery for refugees and migrants with a focus on vulnerable groups. The structure, the main focus and outputs of the project are described and summarized in this paper, providing relevant information and access to educational materials for Hungarian (primary care) physicians. The EUR-HUMAN project was operated in 2016 under the auspices of the European Commission and funded by the Consumers, Health, Agriculture and Food Executive Agency (CHAFEA). Orv Hetil. 2018; 159(35): 1414-1422.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1556/650.2018.31187DOI Listing
September 2018

No common understanding of profession terms utilized in health services research : An add-on qualitative study in the context of the QUALICOPC project in Austria.

Wien Klin Wochenschr 2017 Jan 19;129(1-2):52-58. Epub 2016 Dec 19.

Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.

Background: Health services research, especially in primary care, is challenging because the systems differ widely between countries. This study aimed to explore the different understanding of the terminology used, particularly, regarding the professions nursing and medical secretaries.

Methods: The study was an add-on study to the Quality and Costs in Primary Care (QUALICOPC) project in Austria and designed as qualitative research. The qualitative phase was conducted by using semi-structured telephone interviews with general practitioners (GP). and17 GPs participated in the study.

Results: No uniform meaning of the terms commonly utilized for the abovementioned health professions could be found among Austrian GPs. For example, under the profession term practice assistants, nurses as well as literal medical secretaries with and without special education and related work competencies and responsibilities were subsumed.

Conclusions: Our study results show that no uniform meaning of the terms commonly utilized for above described health profession could be found even within one country by GPs. These findings are highly relevant, especially, when trying to compare results with similar data from other countries or negotiating about workforce issues. Our findings implicate several action points for health services research and health policy. We propose the development of a harmonized terminology in Europe for the health profession based on standards of undergraduate and postgraduate education, competencies and continuous education commitments. This would not only benefit comparative health system research but also patient safety across Europe.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00508-016-1146-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5247533PMC
January 2017

Comparing effectiveness of palliative care for elderly people in long-term care facilities in Europe (PACE). EFPC: European Forum for Primary Care.

Eur J Gen Pract 2014 Jun 22;20(2):155. Epub 2014 Apr 22.

EFPC coördinator, , http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Primary-Care-Forum-2801587/about , http://www.twitter.com/PrimaryCare4um.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/13814788.2014.907782DOI Listing
June 2014

Improving interprofessional collaboration in primary care: position paper of the European Forum for Primary Care.

Qual Prim Care 2012 ;20(4):303-12

Département de Médecine Générale, Université de Caen-Basse Normandie, France.

Primary care is the central pillar of health care. The increasingly complex health needs of the population and individual patients in a changing society can only be met by promoting interprofessional collaboration (IpC) within primary care teams. The aim of this Position Paper of the European Forum for Primary Care (EFPC) is to analyse how to improve IpC within primary care teams. Clarification of the concept is the first step. Conditions to improve IpC are based on the education of healthcare professionals, adapting human resources, the occupational structure and the skill-mix in primary care. These conditions, dependent on contextual factors, have a major influence on the development of IpC. They can be developed and organised at different levels: national, regional or team level. A framework is also needed to evaluate the level of collaboration within teams. Examples of good practice throughout Europe issued from the EFPC network illustrate this.
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November 2012

EFPC: European Forum for Primary Care.

Eur J Gen Pract 2011 Dec 30;17(4):254-5. Epub 2011 Oct 30.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/13814788.2011.627426DOI Listing
December 2011

The future of primary healthcare in Europe III, Pisa 2010.

Qual Prim Care 2011 ;19(2):63-5

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July 2011

EFPC: European Forum for Primary Care.

Eur J Gen Pract 2011 Jun 21;17(2):139-40. Epub 2011 Apr 21.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/13814788.2011.576244DOI Listing
June 2011
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