Publications by authors named "Deborah Aaron"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Validation of the OMNI RPE Seven Day Exertional Recall Questionnaire.

Res Q Exerc Sport 2013 Sep;84(3):363-72

Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101, USA.

Purpose: The present study examined the validity of the Seven Day Recall Questionnaire among recreationally active men and women.

Method: Initially, participants completed a level walk (2.5 mph [4.0 kph]), hill walk (3.5 mph [5.6 kph], 5% grade), and run (5.0 mph [8.0 kph], 2.5% grade). Seven days later, participants were given the Seven Day Recall Questionnaire and rated their perceived exertion associated with the exercise bouts. Participants then repeated the same exercise bouts as in Session 1, and the OMNI rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was estimated.

Results: Concurrent validity indicated that for both men and women, respectively, the RPE-Overall (r = .48, r = .70), RPE-Leg (r = .43, r = .66), and RPE-Chest (r = .47, r = .66) derived from the Seven Day Recall Questionnaire distributed as a function of oxygen consumption. RPE-Overall (r = .61, r = .76), RPE-Leg (r = .56, r = .72), and RPE-Chest (r = .61, r = .72) from the Seven Day Recall Questionnaire distributed as a function of heart rate. Convergent validity coefficients between the perceptual responses from the Seven Day Recall Questionnaire and the recall/criterion session were: level walk (r = .53-.87, r = .51-.80), hill walk (r = .65-.79, r = .56-.64), and run (r = .60-.68, r = .68-.78) for men and women, respectively.

Conclusions: Concurrent and convergent evidence partially supports the utilization of the Seven Day Recall Questionnaire to recall the relative intensity of walking and running exercise sessions conducted 7 days prior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02701367.2013.814042DOI Listing
September 2013

Influence of marriage and parenthood on physical activity: a 2-year prospective analysis.

J Phys Act Health 2010 Sep;7(5):577-83

Dept of Physical Education, Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock, PA, USA.

Background: Physical activity (PA) tends to decrease from adolescence to young adulthood, and factors that have been proposed to contribute to this decrease are life transitions. The focus of this study is to examine life transitions, such as marriage and parenthood, and the impact they may have on the physical activity levels of young adults.

Methods: This 2-year prospective analysis assessed physical activity (hrs/wk) and sociodemographics in young adults (n = 638, 48% male, 15% nonwhite, 24 ± 1.1 years old) via questionnaire. PA data were normalized through log transformations and examined using ANCOVAs, controlling for appropriate covariates.

Results: ANCOVA results showed that becoming married did not significantly change PA compared with individuals who stayed single [F(1,338) = 0.38, P = .54, d = 0.06]. Conversely, PA was significantly lower [F(1,517) = 6.7, P = .01, d = 0.41] after having a child, compared with individuals who stayed childless.

Conclusions: These results suggest that marriage does not impact PA in young adults, but having a child significantly decreases PA in parents, and may offer an optimal period of intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/jpah.7.5.577DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3124092PMC
September 2010

Improved operating room teamwork via SAFETY prep: a rural community hospital's experience.

World J Surg 2009 Jun;33(6):1181-7

Department of Surgery, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 1542 Tulane Avenue, Rm 736, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

Background: Effective teamwork contributes to patient safety in the operating room (OR). For the busy rural surgeon, enhancing OR teamwork can be difficult. This manuscript describes results from the initial implementation of a preoperative briefing protocol at a rural community hospital.

Methods: From July 2006 to February 2007, teamwork among OR staff working with a single general surgeon at a rural hospital in Alaska was evaluated before and after introduction of a preoperative briefing protocol. After each case, participants completed a questionnaire applying a 6-point Likert-type scale targeting effectiveness of both the preoperative briefing and OR team interaction. Mean values were calculated from 20 cases before introduction of the preoperative briefing and from another 16 cases after its introduction. Statistical analysis of the difference between pre- and post-protocol team performance was conducted with Student's t test. Mean procedure times were calculated for matched cases pre- and post-intervention and were compared with Wilcoxon's exact test.

Results: Ten members of the OR staff, including the general surgeon, completed both pre- and post-protocol questionnaires. Four additional members of the OR staff completed only pre-protocol questionnaires, and three additional members of the OR staff completed only post-protocol questionnaires. After implementation of the preoperative briefing protocol, the mean score of overall preoperative briefing was 1.01 units higher than before (p < 0.0001), and overall OR team interaction was 0.50 units higher (p < 0.0001). The overall mean post-intervention procedure time was shorter than the overall mean pre-intervention procedure time (31 +/- 12 min versus 50 +/- 18 min) for four categories of matched cases. Because of the small sample size, statistical significance was not achieved (p = 0.057).

Conclusions: Implementation of a preoperative briefing protocol improved overall preoperative briefing and OR team interaction in the study setting. These findings are encouraging for enhancing teamwork and patient safety through implementation of a systematic protocol.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00268-009-9952-2DOI Listing
June 2009

Concurrent muscle hurt and perceived exertion of children during resistance exercise.

Med Sci Sports Exerc 2009 May;41(5):1146-54

Center for Exercise and Health-Fitness Research, Department of Health and Physical Activity, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA.

Purpose: Rating of muscle hurt (RMH) and RPE were concurrently measured for 10- to 14-yr-old females (n = 50) and males (n = 50) performing unilateral biceps curl (BC) and knee extension (KE) isotonic exercise.

Methods: BC and KE exercises were counterbalanced within subjects. Three counterbalanced, 10 repetition sets (30%, 50%, and 70% one repetition maximum (1-RM)) were performed for both exercises. RMH and RPE were obtained for active muscles using the Children's OMNI-Hurt Scale and the Children's OMNI-Resistance Exercise Scale of Perceived Exertion, respectively.

Results: For both females and males, RMH ranged across sets from 1.5 to 6.0 during BC and 3.2 to 6.7 during KE. RPE ranged from 3.4 to 8.3 during BC and 5.0 to 8.9 during KE. Ratings expressed as percent scores were lower (P < 0.01) for RMH than for RPE at the 30%, 50%, and 70% 1-RM during BC and KE for females and males. Regression coefficients for weight lifted as a function of RMH ranged from r = 0.67 to r = 0.87 (P < 0.01) for BC and KE. Correlations between RMH and RPE ranged from r = 0.19 to r = 0.82 across sets for both genders.

Conclusions: Female and male children can concurrently and differentially rate their perceived intensity of muscle hurt and exertion during upper and lower body resistance exercise using numerical category metrics (i.e., OMNI scales) having construct-specific pictorial and verbal descriptors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181930321DOI Listing
May 2009

Implementation of a preoperative briefing protocol improves accuracy of teamwork assessment in the operating room.

Am Surg 2008 Sep;74(9):817-23

Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

This study examined the effect of implementing a new preoperative briefing protocol on self- and peer-assessments of individual operating room (OR) teamwork behaviors. From July 2006 to February 2007, OR teamwork performance at a rural community hospital was evaluated before and after training and implementation of the protocol. After each case, every member on the team completed a 360-degree type teamwork behavior evaluation containing both self- and peer-assessments using a six-point Likert type scale (1 = definitely no to 6 = definitely yes). Individual behavior change was measured using the mean scale score of pre and postprotocol assessments. Statistical analysis included t test for both pre/post and self/peer differences. Data were available for one general surgeon and nine OR staff (pre = 20 cases, post = 16 cases). The preprotocol self-assessment mean score was significantly higher than peer-assessment (5.63 vs 5.29, P < 0.0267). Pre and postprotocol peer assessment mean scores revealed a statistically significant gain in teamwork behaviors. No difference was observed in postassessment mean scores for self- and peer-assessments. Individuals overestimated their teamwork behaviors before protocol implementation. Using a preoperative protocol seems to improve OR staff teamwork behaviors and self-assessment accuracy. The use of a 360-degree assessment method targeting specific, observable behaviors may be useful in evaluating team-based interventions and enhancing teamwork effectiveness.
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September 2008

One repetition maximum prediction models for children using the OMNI RPE Scale.

J Strength Cond Res 2008 Jan;22(1):196-201

Center for Exercise and Health-Fitness Research, Department of Health and Physical Activity, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

This investigation developed statistical models to estimate one repetition maximum (1 RM) muscular strength using submaximal ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) as predictor variables. Ten- to 14-year-old girls (n = 35) and boys (n = 35) performed two sets (10 repetitions) of biceps curl (BC) and knee extension (KE) exercise using weights approximating 30% and 50% 1 RM. RPE was assessed during the final repetition of each set using the children's OMNI Resistance Exercise Scale (0-10). Sex-specific statistical models predicted 1 RM using RPE derived from both sets of BC and KE exercises. For both girls and boys, RPE ranged from 3.7 to 6.6 for BC and 4.1 to 7.2 for KE. Group mean 1 RM was (a) girls: BC, 7.44 kg, KE, 13.25 kg and (b) boys: BC, 9.19 kg, KE, 16.24 kg. One repetition maximum prediction models for girls were significant (P < 0.01) for BC (r = 0.87) and KE (r = 0.89). One repetition maximum prediction models for boys were significant (P < 0.01) for BC (r = 0.89) and KE (r = 0.87). The RPE predictors were practical and accurate measures, making the 1 RM models potentially applicable when assessing large numbers of children in short time periods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0b013e31815f6283DOI Listing
January 2008

Omni scale rating of perceived exertion at ventilatory breakpoint by direct observation of children's kinematics.

Percept Mot Skills 2007 Jun;104(3 Pt 1):975-84

Center for Exercise and Health-Fitness Research University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA.

Direct kinematic observation was used to measure ratings of perceived exertion at the ventilatory breakpoint (RPE-Vpt) in 10- to 14-yr.-old girls (n=22) and boys (n=22). RPE for the overall body, legs, and chest were simultaneously estimated by a trained observer and self-rated by a subject during treadmill exercise using the Children's OMNI-Walk/Run Scale. Subjects' heart rate and oxygen consumption were measured during each minute of exercise. Vpt for the girls and boys, respectively, were 64.2 and 66.5% VO2 max. RPE-Vpt ranged from 6.0 to 6.5 Overall, 7.1 to 7.6 Legs, and 5.0 to 5.5 Chest for both the observation and self-rating procedures. Responses indicated (a) RPE-Vpt (Overall, Legs, Chest) did not differ (p>.05) between the observer and self-rating procedures and (b) Observer RPE-Vpt-Legs was greater (p<.05) than RPE-Vpt-Chest. Findings validated direct kinematic observation to code group-normalized RPE-Vpt for girls and boys performing treadmill exercise.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2466/pms.104.3.975-984DOI Listing
June 2007

Association of childhood sexual abuse with obesity in a community sample of lesbians.

Obesity (Silver Spring) 2007 Apr;15(4):1023-8

Department of Health and Physical Activity, 155 Trees Hall, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA.

Objective: Our goal was to examine the association between childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and obesity in a community-based sample of self-identified lesbians.

Research Methods And Procedures: A diverse sample of women who self-identified as lesbian was recruited from the greater Chicago metropolitan area. Women (n=416) were interviewed about sexual abuse experiences that occurred before the age of 18. Self-reported height and weight were used to calculate BMI and categorize women as normal-weight (<25.0 kg/m2), overweight (25.0 to 29.9 kg/m2), obese (30.0 to 39.9 kg/m2), or severely obese (>or=40 kg/m2). The relationship between CSA and BMI was examined using multinomial logistic regression analysis.

Results: Overall, 31% of women in the sample reported CSA, and 57% had BMI>or=25.0 kg/m2. Mean BMI was 27.8 (+/-7.2) kg/m2 and was significantly higher among women who reported CSA than among those who did not report CSA (29.4 vs. 27.1, p<0.01). CSA was significantly related to weight status; 39% of women who reported CSA compared with 25% of women who did not report CSA were obese (p=0.004). After adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and education, women who reported CSA were more likely to be obese (odds ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.4) or severely obese (odds ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-5.2).

Discussion: Our findings, in conjunction with the available literature, suggest that CSA may be an important risk factor for obesity. Understanding CSA as a factor that may contribute to weight gain or act as a barrier to weight loss or maintenance in lesbians, a high-risk group for both CSA and obesity, is important for developing successful obesity interventions for this group of women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/oby.2007.634DOI Listing
April 2007

Barriers to moderate physical activity in adult lesbians.

Women Health 2006 ;43(1):75-92

Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA.

Adult lesbians are not sufficiently physically active to achieve physical and psychological health benefits. Lesbians are one of the least understood minority groups. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use an ecological framework to identify factors internal to individuals and present in their social environments that may impede participation in regular physical activity. Twenty-one self-identified lesbians aged 22 to 61 years participated in one of four focus groups. The lesbian participants reported many general barriers (i.e., obstacles to participation regardless of sexual orientation) similar to previous research with other populations of women, not stratified by sexual orientation, such as being too tired and the lack of a physical activity partner. A number of lesbian-specific barriers (i.e., obstacles unique to being a lesbian) were also identified, such as the lack of lesbian-focused physical activity groups and the lack of same-sex family memberships to fitness facilities. In conclusion, for many of the general barriers, some of the proven and effective traditional intervention strategies are likely to be effective in increasing physical activity participation rates in the lesbian population. However, barriers related to sexual orientation are likely deeply entrenched in the socio-cultural system of American society and require a societal rethinking of attitudes towards lesbians, a cultural change that is not as easily amenable to traditional health promotion interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J013v43n01_05DOI Listing
January 2007

Observation of perceived exertion in children using the OMNI pictorial scale.

Med Sci Sports Exerc 2006 Jan;38(1):158-66

Center for Exercise and Health-Fitness Research, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Purpose: Concurrent and construct validity of a kinematic exertional observation procedure was examined for 10- to 14-yr-old female (N = 22) and male (N = 22) healthy children.

Methods: A load-incremented treadmill test protocol employing speed/grade changes every 3 min was used. RPE for the overall body (RPE-Overall), legs (RPE-Legs), and chest (RPE-Chest) were simultaneously estimated by an independent observer and self-rated by a subject during each treadmill stage using the Children's OMNI-Walk/Run Scale. Subjects' HR and oxygen consumption (VO2) were measured during each stage. Concurrent validity was established by correlating the observer's RPE with the subject's HR and VO2. Construct validity was examined by correlating submaximal RPE estimated by the observer with RPE estimated by the subject.

Results: The range of responses for the females and males was VO2 = 18.4-43.5 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1), HR = 121-185 bpm, and OMNI Scale RPE- (Overall, -Legs, -Chest) ranging from 1 to 9. Observer RPE (Overall, -Legs, -Chest) for the female and male subjects ranged from 1 to 9. For both female and male groups regression analyses indicated that observer's RPE distributed as a positive function of subject's HR and VO2; r = 0.80-0.91 (P < 0.01). Observer's RPE distributed as a positive function of subject's RPE for both females and males; r = 0.87-0.92 (P < 0.01).

Conclusion: Results support the validity of a direct kinematic observation procedure to estimate OMNI Scale RPE for female and male children performing treadmill exercise. Exertional observation provides an unobtrusive perceptual estimate of exercise intensity and could be included in standardized physical activity assessments for children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/01.mss.0000190595.03402.66DOI Listing
January 2006

Comparison of maximal oxygen consumption between obese black and white adolescents.

Pediatr Res 2005 Sep;58(3):478-82

Department of Exercise, Bloomsburg University, Bloomsburg, PA 17815, USA.

The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) differed between clinically obese black and white children and if a difference existed to determine whether it was related to hematological profiles and/or physical activity/inactivity levels. Twenty-three black and 21 white adolescents were matched for age, BMI, and Tanner stage (II-V). Body composition was determined by DEXA and CT scan. Daily physical activity/inactivity was assessed by questionnaire. VO2max was assessed using the Bruce treadmill protocol. Black participants had significantly lower VO2max and VO2maxFFM values when compared with white adolescents (26.1 +/- 4.2 versus 29.9 +/- 3.1 mL . kg(-1) . min(-1); 48.3 +/- 8.8 versus 55.6 +/- 5.2 mL . kgFFM(-1) . min(-1), respectively). Black adolescents also had significantly lower Hb concentrations ([Hb]) than white children (12.7 +/- 1.3 versus 13.4 +/- 0.7 g/dL). Black adolescents were more physically inactive than their white peers. VO2max correlated with [Hb] for the combined groups. Obese black adolescents had lower VO2max compared with white children and this difference was explained, in part, by the lower [Hb] observed in the black participants. Further investigations should study Hb flow rate (a function of [Hb] . maximal cardiac output) and physical activity/inactivity patterns in obese black and white children as it relates to VO2max.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1203/01.pdr.0000176909.66057.a3DOI Listing
September 2005

Epidemiology of physical activity from adolescence to young adulthood.

World Rev Nutr Diet 2005 ;94:36-41

University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa., USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000088204DOI Listing
December 2005

Validation of the Children's OMNI-Resistance Exercise Scale of perceived exertion.

Med Sci Sports Exerc 2005 May;37(5):819-26

Center for Exercise and Health-Fitness Research, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA.

Purpose: This investigation examined concurrent validity of the Children's OMNI-Resistance Exercise Scale (OMNI-RES) of perceived exertion for 10- to 14-yr-old females (N = 25) and males (N = 25) performing unilateral biceps curl (BC) and knee extension (KE) isotonic exercises.

Methods: The criterion variable was total weight lifted (Wt(tot)), determined separately for females and males during BC and KE. Subjects performed three separate sets of 6, 10, and 14 repetitions for BC and KE at 50% 1-RM. Ratings of perceived exertion for the active muscles (RPE-AM) and overall body (RPE-Overall) were measured during the final repetition.

Results: For both female and male groups across the three sets: (a) RPE-AM ranged from 2.9 to 8.3 for BC and 4.5 to 9.6 for KE, and (b) RPE-O ranged from 1.9 to 7.0 for BC and 3.6 to 7.7 for KE. Positive linear regression coefficients ranged from r = 0.72 to 0.88 (P < 0.01) between Wt(tot) and RPE-AM and RPE-Overall for BC and KE in both gender groupings. RPE did not differ between females and males at any measurement point within each set for BC and KE. RPE-AM was greater (P < 0.01) than RPE-Overall in the three sets of BC and KE.

Conclusion: Findings provided concurrent validation of the Children's OMNI-RES to measure RPE for the active muscle and overall body in 10- to 14-yr-old females and males performing upper and lower body resistance exercise.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/01.mss.0000162619.33236.f1DOI Listing
May 2005

Preadmission patterns of physical activity in a sample of juvenile detainees.

J Adolesc Health 2005 Apr;36(4):354-7

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.

Preadmission patterns of physical activity were examined in a sample of 537 juvenile detainees and compared with the 2001 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), a national sample of high school students. Overall, detained youth reported similar participation in physical activity, surpassing the student sample in some areas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2004.02.040DOI Listing
April 2005

Validation of the children's OMNI RPE scale for stepping exercise.

Med Sci Sports Exerc 2005 Feb;37(2):290-8

Center for Exercise and Health-Fitness Research, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA.

Purpose: The stepping pictorial format of the Children's OMNI Perceived Exertion Scale (0-10) was validated for female (N = 20) and male (N = 20) children, 8-12 yr old with a peak (step) oxygen consumption of 46.1 +/- 5.3 mL.kg(-1).min(-1).

Methods: Ratings of perceived exertion for the overall body (RPE-O), legs (RPE-L), and chest (RPE-C) were determined by the OMNI-Step Scale. Concurrent scale validity was examined by regressing OMNI-Step RPE against oxygen consumption (VO(2); mL.kg(-1).min(-1),) and heart rate (HR, beats.min(-1)). Construct scale validity was examined by regressing OMNI-Step RPE (i.e., conditional metric) against OMNI-Cycle RPE (i.e., criterion metric). Variables were measured at the end of each 2-min stage during load-incremented step and cycle exercise.

Results: The range of responses over the test stages for the combined female and male sample was VO(2): 9.1-38.6 mL.kg(-1).min(-1); HR: 88.0-168.2 beats.min(-1); and RPE-O, RPE-L, and RPE-C: 1.0-9.1. Using concurrent regression models, RPE-O, RPE-L, and RPE-C distributed as positive linear functions of both VO(2) and HR (r = 0.81-0.94 P < 0.05). Construct regression models indicated a strong linear function between OMNI-Step and OMNI-Cycle RPE for females and males. Differences in RPE (O, L, and C) were not found when females and males used pictorials depicting the same or opposite gender. RPE-L was higher (P < 0.05) than RPE-C at all test stages.

Conclusion: Responses established concurrent and construct validity of the Children's OMNI-Step Scale over a wide intensity range. The OMNI-Step Scale is not influenced by pictorials' gender and is effective in assessing both undifferentiated and differentiated RPE in young children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/01.mss.0000149888.39928.9fDOI Listing
February 2005

Comparison of maximal oxygen consumption between black and white prepubertal and pubertal children.

Pediatr Res 2004 Nov 19;56(5):706-13. Epub 2004 Aug 19.

Center for Exercise and Health-Fitness Research, School of Health, Physical and Recreation Education, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 16261, USA.

The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) differed between two selected groups of black and white children and whether a difference existed to determine whether it was related to hematologic profiles, body composition, and/or physical activity/inactivity level. Forty-five prepubertal and 42 pubertal, clinically normal black and white children participated. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to determine body composition. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen was used to determine visceral adipose tissue and s.c. adipose tissue. Daily physical activity/inactivity was assessed by questionnaire. Black prepubertal and pubertal children had lower VO2max values when compared with white children (28.8 +/- 7.8 versus 35.0 +/- 6.5 mL . kg(-1) . min(-1), p < 0.01; 33.7 +/- 6.4 versus 40.4 +/- 10.2 mL . kg(-1) . min(-1), p < 0.05; respectively). Black prepubertal and pubertal children had lower Hb concentrations ([Hb]) and hematocrits than white children (prepubertal: 12.1 +/- 0.5 versus 12.8 +/- 0.9 g/dL, p < 0.001; 35.6 +/- 1.4 versus 37.4 +/- 2.3%, p < 0.01, respectively; pubertal: 13.0 +/- 0.9 versus 13.6 +/- 0.7 g/dL, p < 0.05; 37.7 +/- 2.5 versus 39.5 +/- 2.1%, p < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, these findings indicate that black prepubertal and pubertal children had lower VO2max when compared with their white peers matched for age, pubertal stage, and body mass index. This difference in VO2max could be attributed at least in part to comparatively lower [Hb] and more sedentary lifestyle in the black children. Further investigations should study Hb flow rate (a function of [Hb] x maximal cardiac output) in black and white children as it relates to VO2max.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1203/01.PDR.0000141521.77229.8DDOI Listing
November 2004

Longitudinal study of the number and choice of leisure time physical activities from mid to late adolescence: implications for school curricula and community recreation programs.

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2002 Nov;156(11):1075-80

Department of Health and Physical Education, School of Education, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA.

Background: Physical activity (PA) declines during adolescence. There has been little research describing this decline or examining participation and nonparticipation in specific activities.

Objective: To describe the pattern of change in the number of physical activities, the time spent on specific activities, and the stability of participation and nonparticipation in specific activities during adolescence.

Design And Setting: A population-based 4-year longitudinal study of adolescents recruited from a single suburban school district near Pittsburgh, Pa.

Participants: A total of 782 adolescents, aged 12 to 15 years at baseline.

Main Outcome Measures: Physical activity was measured annually via questionnaire. Outcome measures include hours per week of PA, number of reported activities, and participation (yes or no) in specific activities.

Results: Physical activity declined during the 4 years by 26%. The decline in PA was primarily due to a decrease in the number of reported activities. Adolescents who continued to report an activity during the 4 years of the study maintained or increased the time spent on that specific activity. Female adolescents were more likely to report individual activities, while male adolescents were more likely to report team activities. The probability of maintaining participation in a specific activity during the 4 years was low to moderate, 0.02 to 0.47 for female adolescents and 0.04 to 0.71 for male adolescents. The probability of not participating in a specific activity during the 4 years was extremely high and consistent for male and female adolescents, 0.70 to 1.00.

Conclusions: The decline in PA during adolescence is primarily due to a decrease in the number of activities in which the adolescent is participating, and there is only a moderate probability that an adolescent will continue to participate in an activity during the 4-year period from junior to senior high. Future efforts should be directed at identifying factors associated with initiating and maintaining participation in specific activities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archpedi.156.11.1075DOI Listing
November 2002
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