Publications by authors named "Dana L Alden"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Improving Shared Decision Making in Latino Men With Prostate Cancer: A Thematic Analysis.

MDM Policy Pract 2021 Jan-Jun;6(1):23814683211014180. Epub 2021 May 27.

Department of Marketing, Shidler College of Business, University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, Hawai'i.

Multiple studies have shown that digitally mediated decision aids help prepare patients for medical decision making with their providers. However, few studies have investigated whether decision-support preferences differ between non-English-speaking and English-speaking Latino men with limited literacy. To identify and compare health information seeking patterns, preferences for information presentation, and interest in digital decision aids in a sample of Southern Californian underserved Latino men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer at a county hospital. We conducted semistructured, in-depth telephone interviews with 12 Spanish-speaking and 8 English-speaking Latino men using a purposive sampling technique. Following transcription of taped interviews, Spanish interviews were translated. Using a coding protocol developed by the team, two bilingual members jointly analyzed the transcripts for emerging themes. Coder agreement exceeded 80%. Differences were resolved through discussion. Thematic differences between groups with different preferred languages emerged. Most respondents engaged in online health information seeking using cellphones, perceived a paternalistic patient-provider relationship, and expressed willingness to use hypothetical digital decision aids if recommended by their provider. English speakers reported higher digital technology proficiency for health-related searches. They also more frequently indicated family involvement in digital search related to their condition and preferred self-guided, web-based decision aids. In comparison, Spanish speakers reported lower digital technology proficiency and preferred family-involved, coach-guided, paper and visual decision aids. English speakers reported substantially higher levels of formal education. Preferences regarding the use of digital technology to inform prostate cancer treatment decision making among underserved Latino men varied depending on preferred primary language. Effective preparation of underserved Latino men for shared decision making requires consideration of alternative approaches depending on level of education attainment and preferred primary language.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/23814683211014180DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8165846PMC
May 2021

Differences in Implementation Outcomes of a Shared Decision-Making Program for Men with Prostate Cancer between an Academic Medical Center and County Health Care System.

Med Decis Making 2021 02 13;41(2):120-132. Epub 2021 Jan 13.

Department of Urology, University of California Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Background: Shared decision making (SDM) has long been advocated as the preferred way for physicians and men with prostate cancer to make treatment decisions. However, the implementation of formal SDM programs in routine care remains limited, and implementation outcomes for disadvantaged populations are especially poorly described. We describe the implementation outcomes between academic and county health care settings.

Methods: We administered a decision aid (DA) for men with localized prostate cancer at an academic center and across a county health care system. Our implementation was guided by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research and the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance framework. We assessed the effectiveness of the DA through a postappointment patient survey.

Results: Sites differed by patient demographic/clinical characteristics. Reach (DA invitation rate) was similar and insensitive to implementation strategies at the academic center and county (66% v. 60%, = 0.37). Fidelity (DA completion rate) was also similar at the academic center and county (77% v. 80%, = 0.74). DA effectiveness was similar between sites, except for higher academic center ratings for net promoter for the doctor (77% v. 37%, = 0.01) and the health care system (77% v. 35%, = 0.006) and greater satisfaction with manner of care (medians 100 v. 87.5, = 0.04). Implementation strategies (e.g., faxing of patients' records and meeting patients in the clinic to complete the DA) represented substantial practice changes at both sites. The completion rate increased following the onset of reminder calls at the academic center and the creation of a Spanish module at the county.

Conclusions: Successful DA implementation efforts should focus on patient engagement and access. SDM may broadly benefit patients and health care systems regardless of patient demographic/clinical characteristics.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0272989X20982533DOI Listing
February 2021

Improving Patient Preparedness and Confidence in Discussing Advance Directives for End-of-Life Care with Health Care Providers in the United States and Japan.

Med Decis Making 2021 01 7;41(1):60-73. Epub 2020 Nov 7.

Visiting Research Scholar, Department of Marketing, Shidler College of Business, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI, USA.

Background: The low completion rate of advance directives (ADs) has received attention in Japan and the United States, as policy makers and health care professionals face aging populations with multiple comorbidities. Among the barriers to AD planning, cultural values and attitudes appear to be particularly influential. A comparison of culturally distinct societies provides a deeper understanding of these barriers. Through such an approach, this study identifies strategies for increasing AD planning among late-middle-age Japanese and US individuals.

Methods: After giving informed consent for the Institutional Review Board-approved study, Japanese and US respondents (45-65 y; 50% female) without ADs completed a language-appropriate online survey. Participants were asked to review a decision aid as part of a scenario-based physician consultation regarding artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH). Hypotheses were analyzed using multigroup structural equation modeling.

Results: Important similarities were identified across the 2 groups. After reviewing the decision aid, both samples strongly preferred "no ANH." Respondents who strongly valued either self-reliance or interpersonal relationships experienced greater preparedness for AD planning. In both countries, greater decision preparedness and positive death attitude predicted greater confidence to discuss care options with a provider. Finally, cultural values predicted preference for family participation: respondents with a strong interdependent self-concept desired more family involvement, whereas high independents preferred less.

Conclusions: Findings indicate the importance of documenting care preferences and accounting for individual differences. To increase AD adoption, providers should identify patient segments likely to benefit most from the interventions. Targeting individuals in both countries who value self-reliance and interpersonal relationships appears to be a good place to begin. Such individuals can be identified clinically through administration of validated measures used in this study.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0272989X20969683DOI Listing
January 2021

Culture, Self, and Medical Decision Making in Australia and China: A Structural Model Analysis.

MDM Policy Pract 2019 Jul-Dec;4(2):2381468319871018. Epub 2019 Sep 20.

School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

To explore and compare the influences of individual-level cultural values and personal attitudinal values on the desire for medical information and self-involvement in decision making in Australia and China. A total of 288 and 291 middle-aged adults from Australia and China, respectively, completed an online survey examining cultural and personal values, and their desired level of self-influence on medical decision making. Structural equation modeling was used to test 15 hypotheses relating to the effects of cultural and personal antecedents on the individual desire for influence over medical decision making. Similar factors in both Australia and China (total variance explained: Australia 29%; China 35%) predicted desire for medical information, with interdependence (unstandardized path coefficient β = 0.102, = 0.014; β = 0.215, = 0.001), independence (β = 0.244, < 0.001; β = 0.123, = 0.037), and health locus of control (β = -0.140, = 0.018; β = -0.138, = 0.007) being significant and positive predictors. A desire for involvement in decisions was only predicted by power distance, which had an opposite effect of being negative for Australia and positive for China (total variance explained: Australia 11%; China 5%; β = 0.294, < 0.001; China: β = -0.190, = 0.043). National culture moderated the effect of independence on desire for medical information, which was stronger in Australia than China ( score = 1.687, < 0.05). Study results demonstrate that in both countries, desire for medical information can be influenced by individual-level cultural and personal values, suggesting potential benefits of tailoring health communication to personal mindsets to foster informed decision making. The desired level of self-involvement in decision making was relatively independent of other cultural and personal values in both countries, suggesting caution against cultural stereotypes. Study findings also suggest that involvement preferences in decision making should be considered separately from information needs at the clinical encounter.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2381468319871018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6755644PMC
September 2019

The effects of culturally targeted patient decision aids on medical consultation preparation for Hispanic women in the U.S.: Results from four randomized experiments.

Soc Sci Med 2018 09 2;212:17-25. Epub 2018 Jul 2.

Baylor College of Medicine, United States.

Rationale: Do culturally targeted patient decision aids (DAs) better prepare lower-middle and middle-class Hispanic American women for medical decision making compared to DAs designed for the general population? Health promotion evidence indicates that inclusion of cultural values, imagery, linguistics, and health data in a DA will improve ethnic patients' preparation relative to a generic DA; yet, this hypothesis remains untested.

Method: Four experiments examined consultation preparation effects of culturally targeted versus generic DAs for Hispanic women living in the United States. Drawing on highly rated online DAs, an experienced Hispanic content developer and Hispanic focus groups worked with researchers to develop culturally targeted digital DAs. Online panels of self-identified Hispanic women in the U.S. were randomly assigned to a targeted or generic DA as part of a scenario-based physician consultation for advanced diabetes (Study 1) or early stage breast cancer (Studies 2-4).

Results: Manipulation checks showed high awareness of cultural information in the targeted DA group. Despite efforts to rule out confounds that could account for null effects, DA cultural targeting did not increase knowledge, decision preparedness, or empowerment or reduce decision conflict in the four randomized experiments. Only individual difference variables (e.g., group interdependence) consistently predicted enhanced DA consultation preparation effects. Related research indicates that culture at the group level may exert less influence when individuals think deliberatively, feel less constrained by limited resources such as time, understand processing objectives, and/or are primed with task-specific schema/norms.

Conclusion: Given deeper deliberation and clearly primed processing objectives, personal experiences and task-related schema/norms may have significantly reduced the effects of cultural targeting. Consistent findings from four studies suggest that culturally targeted DAs may not better prepare Hispanic women in the U.S. for medical decision making than generic versions designed for the broader population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2018.06.030DOI Listing
September 2018

Who Decides: Me or We? Family Involvement in Medical Decision Making in Eastern and Western Countries.

Med Decis Making 2018 01 8;38(1):14-25. Epub 2017 Jul 8.

Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand (SL).

Background: Research suggests that desired family involvement (FI) in medical decision making may depend on cultural values. Unfortunately, the field lacks cross-cultural studies that test this assumption. As a result, providers may be guided by incomplete information or cultural biases rather than patient preferences.

Methods: Researchers developed 6 culturally relevant disease scenarios varying from low to high medical seriousness. Quota samples of approximately 290 middle-aged urban residents in Australia, China, Malaysia, India, South Korea, Thailand, and the USA completed an online survey that examined desired levels of FI and identified individual difference predictors in each country. All reliability coefficients were acceptable. Regression models met standard assumptions.

Results: The strongest finding across all 7 countries was that those who desired higher self-involvement (SI) in medical decision making also wanted lower FI. On the other hand, respondents who valued relational-interdependence tended to want their families involved - a key finding in 5 of 7 countries. In addition, in 4 of 7 countries, respondents who valued social hierarchy desired higher FI. Other antecedents were less consistent.

Conclusion: These results suggest that it is important for health providers to avoid East-West cultural stereotypes. There are meaningful numbers of patients in all 7 countries who want to be individually involved and those individuals tend to prefer lower FI. On the other hand, more interdependent patients are likely to want families involved in many of the countries studied. Thus, individual differences within culture appear to be important in predicting whether a patient desires FI. For this reason, avoiding culture-based assumptions about desired FI during medical decision making is central to providing more effective patient centered care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0272989X17715628DOI Listing
January 2018

What is a good medical decision? A research agenda guided by perspectives from multiple stakeholders.

J Behav Med 2017 Feb 26;40(1):52-68. Epub 2016 Aug 26.

Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Surgery, Washington University, 660 S. Euclid Ave, Campus Box 8100, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.

Informed and shared decision making are critical aspects of patient-centered care, which has contributed to an emphasis on decision support interventions to promote good medical decision making. However, researchers and healthcare providers have not reached a consensus on what defines a good decision, nor how to evaluate it. This position paper, informed by conference sessions featuring diverse stakeholders held at the 2015 Society of Behavioral Medicine and Society for Medical Decision Making annual meetings, describes key concepts that influence the decision making process itself and that may change what it means to make a good decision: interpersonal factors, structural constraints, affective influences, and values clarification methods. This paper also proposes specific research questions within each of these priority areas, with the goal of moving medical decision making research to a more comprehensive definition of a good medical decision, and enhancing the ability to measure and improve the decision making process.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10865-016-9785-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5296255PMC
February 2017

Culture and medical decision making: Healthcare consumer perspectives in Japan and the United States.

Health Psychol 2015 Dec 15;34(12):1133-44. Epub 2015 Jun 15.

Department of Marketing.

Objective: Two studies identified core value influences on medical decision-making processes across and within cultures.

Methods: In Study 1, Japanese and American adults reported desired levels of medical decision-making influence across conditions that varied in seriousness. Cultural antecedents (interdependence, independence, and power distance) were also measured. In Study 2, American adults reviewed a colorectal cancer screening decision aid. Decision preparedness was measured along with interdependence, independence, and desire for medical information.

Results: In Study 1, higher interdependence predicted stronger desire for decision-making information in both countries, but was significantly stronger in Japan. The path from information desire to decision-making influence desire was significant only in Japan. The independence path to desire for decision-making influence was significant only in the United States. Power distance effects negatively predicted desire for decision-making influence only in the United States. For Study 2, high (low) interdependents and women (men) in the United States felt that a colorectal cancer screening decision aid helped prepare them more (less) for a medical consultation. Low interdependent men were at significantly higher risk for low decision preparedness.

Conclusions: Study 1 suggests that Japanese participants may tend to view medical decision-making influence as an interdependent, information sharing exchange, whereas American respondents may be more interested in power sharing that emphasizes greater independence. Study 2 demonstrates the need to assess value influences on medical decision-making processes within and across cultures and suggests that individually tailored versions of decision aids may optimize decision preparedness.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hea0000229DOI Listing
December 2015

Decision aid influences on factors associated with patient empowerment prior to cancer treatment decision making.

Authors:
Dana L Alden

Med Decis Making 2014 Oct 5;34(7):884-98. Epub 2014 Jun 5.

University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, USA (DLA)

Background: Despite progress, models that incorporate antecedent and mediating factors associated with shared decision making (SDM)-related outcomes remain limited. An experimental study tests patient decision aid (DA) effects on a network of antecedents and mediators associated with patient empowerment prior to a medical decision-making consultation regarding cancer treatment.

Methods: A pilot study initially evaluated measurement scales, model fit, and the overall effect of the DA experience. The pilot compared matched treatment and control group samples of US adult online panel members exposed to a vignette about meeting their dermatologist to decide on skin cancer treatment. The treatment group also experienced a skin cancer DA with treatment options and value clarification activity, while the control group did not. The main study employed a randomized experimental design to formally test hypothesized path coefficients across the groups.

Results: The pilot study suggested an overall enhanced DA effect on self-empowerment. In the experimental study, the DA experience strengthened the direct path from desire for medical information to self-empowerment and the indirect path from comprehension/participation confidence to self-empowerment through cancer attitude. The DA had no strengthening effect on the direct path from life satisfaction to self-empowerment, but in the DA condition, the factor appeared to play a role by contributing to the enhanced association between confidence and cancer attitude.

Conclusion: Evidence from this research indicates that experiencing a DA prior to treatment decision making affects patient empowerment through a network that includes desire for information, life satisfaction, and multiple mediators. The studies also demonstrate the role that theory-based, multigroup structural equation modeling (SEM) can play in increasing understanding of DA effects. Such understanding is critical to improving SDM between patients and their physicians.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0272989X14536780DOI Listing
October 2014

Cultural targeting and tailoring of shared decision making technology: a theoretical framework for improving the effectiveness of patient decision aids in culturally diverse groups.

Soc Sci Med 2014 Mar 15;105:1-8. Epub 2014 Jan 15.

Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

Patient decision aids are known to positively impact outcomes critical to shared decision making (SDM), such as gist knowledge and decision preparedness. However, research on the potential improvement of these and other important outcomes through cultural targeting and tailoring of decision aids is very limited. This is the case despite extensive evidence supporting use of cultural targeting and tailoring to improve the effectiveness of health communications. Building on prominent psychological theory, we propose a two-stage framework incorporating cultural concepts into the design process for screening and treatment decision aids. The first phase recommends use of cultural constructs, such as collectivism and individualism, to differentially target patients whose cultures are known to vary on these dimensions. Decision aid targeting is operationalized through use of symbols and values that appeal to members of the given culture. Content dimensions within decision aids that appear particularly appropriate for targeting include surface level visual characteristics, language, beliefs, attitudes and values. The second phase of the framework is based on evidence that individuals vary in terms of how strongly cultural norms influence their approach to problem solving and decision making. In particular, the framework hypothesizes that differences in terms of access to cultural mindsets (e.g., access to interdependent versus independent self) can be measured up front and used to tailor decision aids. Thus, the second phase in the framework emphasizes the importance of not only targeting decision aid content, but also tailoring the information to the individual based on measurement of how strongly he/she is connected to dominant cultural mindsets. Overall, the framework provides a theory-based guide for researchers and practitioners who are interested in using cultural targeting and tailoring to develop and test decision aids that move beyond a "one-size fits all" approach and thereby, improve SDM in our multicultural world.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2014.01.002DOI Listing
March 2014

Shared decision making and patient decision aids: knowledge, attitudes, and practices among Hawai'i physicians.

Hawaii J Med Public Health 2013 Nov;72(11):396-400

Shidler College of Business, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (D.L.A.).

Background: As the health care field moves toward patient-centered care (PCC), increasing emphasis has been placed on the benefits of patient decision aids for promoting shared decision making (SDM). This study provides a baseline measure of knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) among Hawai'i's physicians with respect to patient decision aids (DAs). Physicians throughout the State of Hawai'i were invited to complete a survey assessing their knowledge, attitudes, and practices with respect to the clinical use of DAs. One hundred and seventy four valid surveys were analyzed. Reported awareness and use of DAs were low, but recognition of the benefits of SDM and openness to the use of DAs were very high. The leading perceived barriers to the implementation of DAs were lack of awareness, lack of resources, and limited physician time to learn about DA technology. However, a significant majority of the respondents reported that DAs could empower patients by improving knowledge (88%), increasing satisfaction with the consultation process (81%), and increasing compliance (74%). Among physicians currently employing DAs, use of brochures or options matrix sheets was the most common aid tool. However, leading recommended DA formats were paper-based brochures for clinic use (75%) and interactive online website programs for outside clinic use (73.5%). Given growing emphasis on the PCC model and the recognized desire of many patients to participate in the medical decision making process, positive responses toward SDM and the use of DAs by Hawai'i physicians are promising.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3831568PMC
November 2013

Investigating approaches to improving appropriate antibiotic use among higher risk ethnic groups.

Hawaii Med J 2010 Nov;69(11):260-3

University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA.

A field study with follow up investigations sought to: 1. determine whether cold packs (over-the-counter symptomtic treatments), coupled with in-office education, improve antibiotic-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviors more than in-office education alone in patient populations with high percentages of Asian Americans and Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders; 2. identify possible reasons for intervention outcomes as described by physicians who participated in the field study; and 3. explore potential future directions based on a large sample survey of physicians in the field study's highly ethnic county. The intervention resulted in a pre- to post-consultation decrease in perceived need for and an increase in knowledge about antibiotic risks but had no impact on frequency of reported receipt of an antibiotic prescription. Unexpectedly, in-office education alone was more effective in increasing knowledge than in-office education plus the cold pack. In-depth interviews of field study physicians and a large scale physician survey suggest that cold pack interventions targeting patient populations with high percentages of Asian Americans and Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders may be more likely to succeed if accompanied by mass public education regarding risks and physician training regarding effective ways to talk to patients. Use of in-office education with cold packs alone may not achieve desired results.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3071189PMC
November 2010

Young adult preferences for physician decision-making style in Japan and the United States.

Asia Pac J Public Health 2012 Jan 10;24(1):173-84. Epub 2010 May 10.

University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, Hawai'i 96822, USA.

Studies in Japan and the United States investigate preferences for patient-physician decision-making style among young adults in the context of a primary care clinic visit for an upper respiratory infection. A treatment scenario described 1 of 3 decision-making styles: a young adult and doctor using a passive (physician decides), shared (patient and physician decide together), or autonomous (patient decides from a set of medically appropriate alternatives) decision-making style. Unexpectedly, Japanese respondents evaluated the autonomous interaction most positively. US respondents evaluated the shared decision-making scenario most positively. Overall, despite large cultural differences, both country samples favored higher participation in decision making. These results suggest that passive patient approaches are falling out of favor as patient-centered care expectations diffuse globally, even in traditionally hierarchic societies with high levels of respect for authority. The implications of these findings along with managerial implications and suggestions for future research are presented.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1010539510365098DOI Listing
January 2012

The impact of social franchising on the use of reproductive health and family planning services at public commune health stations in Vietnam.

BMC Health Serv Res 2010 Feb 28;10:54. Epub 2010 Feb 28.

Vietnam Evidence for Health Policy Project, School of Population Health, University of Queensland, Health Strategy and Policy Institute, 138 Giang Vo Str, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Background: Service franchising is a business model that involves building a network of outlets (franchisees) that are locally owned, but act in coordinated manner with the guidance of a central headquarters (franchisor). The franchisor maintains quality standards, provides managerial training, conducts centralized purchasing and promotes a common brand. Research indicates that franchising private reproductive health and family planning (RHFP) services in developing countries improves quality and utilization. However, there is very little evidence that franchising improves RHFP services delivered through community-based public health clinics. This study evaluates behavioral outcomes associated with a new approach - the Government Social Franchise (GSF) model - developed to improve RHFP service quality and capacity in Vietnam's commune health stations (CHSs).

Methods: The project involved networking and branding 36 commune health station (CHS) clinics in two central provinces of Da Nang and Khanh Hoa, Vietnam. A quasi-experimental design with 36 control CHSs assessed GSF model effects on client use as measured by: 1) clinic-reported client volume; 2) the proportion of self-reported RHFP service users at participating CHS clinics over the total sample of respondents; and 3) self-reported RHFP service use frequency. Monthly clinic records were analyzed. In addition, household surveys of 1,181 CHS users and potential users were conducted prior to launch and then 6 and 12 months after implementing the GSF network. Regression analyses controlled for baseline differences between intervention and control groups.

Results: CHS franchise membership was significantly associated with a 40% plus increase in clinic-reported client volumes for both reproductive and general health services. A 45% increase in clinic-reported family planning service clients related to GSF membership was marginally significant (p = 0.05). Self-reported frequency of RHFP service use increased by 20% from the baseline survey to the 12 month post-launch survey (p < 0.05). However, changes in self-reported usage rate were not significantly associated with franchise membership (p = 0.15).

Conclusions: This study provides preliminary evidence regarding the ability of the Government Social Franchise model to increase use of reproductive health and family planning service in smaller public sector clinics. Further investigations, including assessment of health outcomes associated with increased use of GSF services and cost-effectiveness of the model, are required to better delineate the effectiveness and limitations of franchising RHFP services in the public health system in Vietnam and other developing countries.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6963-10-54DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2845125PMC
February 2010

Antibiotics and upper respiratory infections: the impact of Asian and Pacific Island ethnicity on knowledge, perceived need, and use.

Ethn Dis 2006 ;16(1):268-74

College of Business, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA.

The threat of microbial resistance to antibiotics grows increasingly serious each year. Despite the severity of the problem, little is known about ways that ethnicity and culture influence antibiotic knowledge, attitudes, and use. Based on a random sample of residents from a multicultural metropolitan county in the western United States, this study finds that Filipinos have lower levels of antibiotic knowledge, express higher perceived need, and report more frequent use. Whites in this sample are at the opposite end on all of these measures; other Asian Americans and Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders are in between. The results also suggest that preference for a "paternalistic" interaction/decision-making style between Filipino patients and their physicians may increase the challenge of designing an effective intervention promoting appropriate antibiotic use; a social marketing approach may be one possible alternative. Implications and future research directions are discussed for other multicultural urban environments that experience inappropriate use of antibiotics.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2006

Client satisfaction with reproductive health-care quality: integrating business approaches to modeling and measurement.

Soc Sci Med 2004 Dec;59(11):2219-32

Department of Marketing, College of Business Administration, University of Hawai'i, 2404 Maile Way, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA.

Health-care managers are increasingly interested in client perceptions of clinic service quality and satisfaction. While tremendous progress has occurred, additional perspectives on the conceptualization, modeling and measurement of these constructs may further assist health-care managers seeking to provide high-quality care. To that end, this study draws on theories from business and health to develop an integrated model featuring antecedents to and consequences of reproductive health-care client satisfaction. In addition to developing a new model, this study contributes by testing how well Western-based theories of client satisfaction hold in a developing, Asian country. Applied to urban, reproductive health clinic users in Hanoi, Vietnam, test results suggest that hypothesized antecedents such as pre-visit expectations, perceived clinic performance and how much performance exceeds expectations impact client satisfaction. However, the relative importance of these predictors appears to vary depending on a client's level of service-related experience. Finally, higher levels of client satisfaction are positively related to future clinic use intentions. This study demonstrates the value of: (1) incorporating theoretical perspectives from multiple disciplines to model processes underlying health-care satisfaction and (2) field testing those models before implementation. It also furthers research designed to provide health-care managers with actionable measures of the complex processes related to their clients' satisfaction.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2004.03.026DOI Listing
December 2004
-->