Publications by authors named "Charlene S Aaron"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Recruitment of African Americans With Type 2 Diabetes Who Care For Persons With Dementia: Lessons Learned.

Authors:
Charlene S Aaron

Clin Nurs Res 2016 Feb;25(1):3-8

Illinois State University, Normal, USA

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1054773815621217DOI Listing
February 2016

Infusing geropsychiatric nursing content into curricula: challenges and solutions.

J Nurs Educ 2014 Jul;53(7):387-94

Nurses of the 21st century are unprepared to care for the increasing older adult population's mental health care needs. Nursing schools across the country struggle to identify and infuse geropsychiatric nursing content into curricula. In 2008, the John A. Hartford Foundation partnered with the American Academy of Nursing to fund a 4-year project, the Geropsychiatric Nursing Collaborative (GPNC). In 2011, four schools of nursing were selected to participate in the GPNC consultation project. This article describes two major challenges that schools currently face as they work to infuse geropsychiatric nursing content into nursing curricula and the solutions offered. Core geropsychiatric nursing competencies and content were identified to assist curriculum mapping, and examples of faculty resources for teaching about depression, dementia, and delirium were outlined. Incorporation of geropsychiatric nursing content is critical for preparing our future workforce to meet the increasing mental health care needs of older adults.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/01484834-20140619-09DOI Listing
July 2014

Trends and opportunities in geropsychiatric nursing: enhancing practice through specialization and interprofessional education.

J Nurs Educ 2013 Jun 9;52(6):317-21. Epub 2013 May 9.

Harding University-Carr College of Nursing, Searcy, AR 72149, USA.

Forecasted changes in the demographics of the United States suggest there will be an unprecedented need for health care professionals with specific training in geropsychiatric care. An aging society, the dearth of geropsychiatric health care professionals, the shortage of educators, and the lack of interprofessional geropsychiatric education require new strategies for nursing education to address these issues. The vision of the Institute of Medicine serves as a foundation for transforming geropsychiatric nursing and interprofessional education to prepare the next generation of nurses and the geropsychiatric workforce to improve the mental health care of older adults. This article aims to describe the importance and implications of implementing the recently released Geropsychiatric Nursing Competency Enhancements and the Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice to improve the mental health care of older Americans. A secondary aim is to discuss how to overcome barriers in implementing interprofessional education in geropsychiatric nursing care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/01484834-20130509-03DOI Listing
June 2013

The positive impact of preceptors on recruitment and retention of RNs in long-term care.

Authors:
Charlene S Aaron

J Gerontol Nurs 2011 Apr 22;37(4):48-54. Epub 2010 Dec 22.

Mennonite College of Nursing, Illinois State University, Normal, IL, USA.

Nearly 100,000 nursing positions in long-term care (LTC) are vacant on any given day, and the nurse turnover rate exceeds 50%. In addition, recruitment of and orientation programs for new nurses are costly for facilities. Preceptor programs have been successful in recruitment and retention of acute care nurses, but no recent literature addresses preceptor programs in LTC. The Expanding the Teaching-Nursing Home Culture in the State of Illinois project explored the development of a preceptor program to fit the LTC environment in which an RN was chosen to serve as the preceptor and mentor and orient all new nurses. Although the LTC environment presents social and economic challenges, a structured preceptor program allows nurses new to LTC to meet these challenges. By retaining nurses, residents receive continuity of care. This strategy for recruitment and retention of nurses results in professional growth, competent and stable staff, and a stronger bottom line.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/00989134-20101112-01DOI Listing
April 2011
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