Publications by authors named "Carolina Carreiro"

3 Publications

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Acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients with COVID-19: A Portuguese cohort.

Nefrologia 2021 May 14. Epub 2021 May 14.

Division of Nephrology and Renal Transplantation, Department of Medicine, Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Norte, EPE, Av. Prof. Egas Moniz, 1649-035 Lisboa, Portugal.

Introduction: The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients ranges from 0.5% to 35% and has been associated with worse prognosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence, severity, duration, risk factors and prognosis of AKI in hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective single-center analysis of 192 hospitalized COVID-19 patients from March to May of 2020. AKI was diagnosed using the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcome (KDIGO) classification based on serum creatinine (SCr) criteria. Persistent and transient AKI were defined according to the Acute Disease Quality Initiative (ADQI) workgroup definitions.

Results: In this cohort of COVID-19 patients, 55.2% developed AKI (n=106). The majority of AKI patients had persistent AKI (n=64, 60.4%). Overall, in-hospital mortality was 18.2% (n=35) and was higher in AKI patients (28.3% vs. 5.9%, p<0.001, unadjusted OR 6.03 (2.22-16.37), p<0.001). In this multivariate analysis, older age (adjusted OR 1.07 (95% CI 1.02-1.11), p=0.004), lower Hb level (adjusted OR 0.78 (95% CI 0.60-0.98), p=0.035), duration of AKI (adjusted OR 7.34 for persistent AKI (95% CI 2.37-22.72), p=0.001) and severity of AKI (adjusted OR 2.65 per increase in KDIGO stage (95% CI 1.32-5.33), p=0.006) were independent predictors of mortality.

Conclusion: AKI was frequent in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Persistent AKI and higher severity of AKI were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nefro.2021.04.002DOI Listing
May 2021

Acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients with COVID-19: a Portuguese cohort.

Nefrologia (Engl Ed) 2021 May 14. Epub 2021 May 14.

Division of Nephrology and Renal Transplantation, Department of Medicine, Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Norte, EPE, Av. Prof. Egas Moniz, 1649-035 Lisboa, Portugal.

Introduction: The incidence of AKI in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients ranges from 0.5 to 35% and has been associated with worse prognosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence, severity, duration, risk factors and prognosis of AKI in hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective single-center analysis of 192 hospitalized COVID-19 patients from March to May of 2020. AKI was diagnosed using the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcome (KDIGO) classification based on serum creatinine (SCr) criteria. Persistent and Transient AKI were defined according to the Acute Disease Quality Initiative (ADQI) workgroup definitions.

Results: In this cohort of COVID-19 patients, 55.2% developed AKI (n=106). The majority of AKI patients had persistent AKI (n=64, 60.4%). Overall, in-hospital mortality was 18.2% (n=35) and was higher in AKI patients (28.3% vs 5.9%, p<0.001, unadjusted OR 6.03 (2.22-16.37), p<0.001). In this multivariate analysis, older age (adjusted OR 1.07 (95% CI 1.02-1.11), p=0.004), lower Hb level (adjusted OR 0.78 (95% CI 0.60-0.98), p=0.035), duration of AKI (adjusted OR 7.34 for persistent AKI (95% CI 2.37-22.72), p=0.001) and severity of AKI (adjusted OR 2.65 per increase in KDIGO stage (95% CI 1.32-5.33), p=0.006) were independent predictors of mortality.

Conclusion: AKI was frequent in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Persistent AKI and higher severity of AKI were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nefro.2021.04.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8120482PMC
May 2021

Acute kidney disease and long-term outcomes in critically ill acute kidney injury patients with sepsis: a cohort analysis.

Clin Kidney J 2021 May 27;14(5):1379-1387. Epub 2020 Sep 27.

Division of Nephrology and Renal Transplantation, Department of Medicine, Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Norte, EPE, Lisboa, Portugal.

Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequent during hospitalization and may contribute to adverse short- and long-term consequences. Acute kidney disease (AKD) reflects the continuing pathological processes and adverse events developing after AKI. We aimed to evaluate the association of AKD, long-term adverse renal function and mortality in a cohort of patients with sepsis.

Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of adult patients with septic AKI admitted to the Division of Intensive Medicine of the Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Norte (Lisbon, Portugal) between January 2008 and December 2014. Patients were categorized according to the development of AKI using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) classification. AKI was defined as an increase in absolute serum creatinine (SCr) ≥0.3 mg/dL or by a percentage increase in SCr ≥50% and/or by a decrease in urine output to <0.5 mL/kg/h for >6 h. AKD was defined as presenting at least KDIGO Stage 1 criteria for >7 days after an AKI initiating event. Adverse renal outcomes (need for long-term dialysis and/or a 25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate after hospital discharge) and mortality after discharge were evaluated.

Results: From 256 selected patients with septic AKI, 53.9% developed AKD. The 30-day mortality rate was 24.5% ( = 55). The mean long-term follow-up was 45.9 ± 43.3 months. The majority of patients experience an adverse renal outcome [ = 158 (61.7%)] and 44.1% ( = 113) of patients died during follow-up. Adverse renal outcomes, 30-day mortality and long-term mortality after hospital discharge were more frequent among AKD patients [77.5 versus 43.2% (P < 0.001), 34.1 versus 6.8% (P < 0.001) and 64.8 versus 49.1% (P = 0.025), respectively]. The 5-year cumulative probability of survival was 23.2% for AKD patients, while it was 47.5% for patients with no AKD (log-rank test, P < 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, AKD was independently associated with adverse renal outcomes {adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 2.87 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.0-4.1]; P < 0.001} and long-term mortality [adjusted HR 1.51 (95% CI 1.0-2.2); P = 0.040].

Conclusions: AKD after septic AKI was independently associated with the risk of long-term need for dialysis and/or renal function decline and with the risk of death after hospital discharge.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ckj/sfaa130DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8087131PMC
May 2021