Publications by authors named "Buncha Ooraikul"

10 Publications

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Anti-Inflammatory Investigations of Extracts of .

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2021 6;2021:5512961. Epub 2021 Mar 6.

Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2P5, Canada.

has been consumed in the diet in northern Thailand and also used as a medicament in ancient scripture for arthropathies. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the activity of various extracts from differential parts of via inhibition of inflammatory mediators (NO, TNF-, and PGE) in RAW264.7 macrophages. The chemical composition in active extracts was also analyzed by GC/MS. The parts of this plant studied were whole fruits (F), pericarp (P), and seed (O). The methods of extraction included maceration in hexane, 95% ethanol and 50% ethanol, boiling in water, and water distillation. The results demonstrated that the hexane and 95% ethanolic extract from pericarp (PH and P95) and seed essential oil (SO) were the most active extracts. PH and P95 gave the highest inhibition of NO production with IC as 11.99 ± 1.66 g/ml and 15.33 ± 1.05 g/ml, respectively, and they also showed the highest anti-inflammatory effect on TNF- with IC as 36.08 ± 0.55 g/ml and 34.90 ± 2.58 g/ml, respectively. PH and P95 also showed the highest inhibitory effect on PGE but less than SO with IC as 13.72 ± 0.81 g/ml, 12.26 ± 0.71 g/ml, and 8.61 ± 2.23 g/ml, respectively. 2,3-Pinanediol was the major anti-inflammatory compound analyzed in PH (11.28%) and P95 (19.82%) while terpinen-4-ol constituted a major anti-inflammatory compound in SO at 35.13%. These findings are the first supportive data for ethnomedical use for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity in acute (SO) and chronic (PH and P95) inflammation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2021/5512961DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7955865PMC
March 2021

Effects of Various Preextraction Treatments of Leaf on Its Anti-Inflammatory Activity and Chemical Properties.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2021 28;2021:8850744. Epub 2021 Jan 28.

Department of Agricultural Food and Nutritional Science, Faculty of Agricultural Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2P5, Canada.

Linn. has been used in Thai traditional medicine to relieve inflammatory symptoms and treat osteoarthritis. There have been reports on its potent anti-inflammatory property but nothing on the effects of different pretreatments on its chemical properties and anti-inflammatory activity. Pretreatment of herbal raw materials is an important step which affects the overall quality of Thai traditional medicine. The objectives of this study were to investigate different treatments of leaves prior to ethanolic extraction and to compare the extracts for their anti-inflammatory activity and chemical properties. The treatments included hot air drying in an oven, microwave drying, traditional grilling on a charcoal stove before drying in an oven, and temperature shock in hot and cold water before hot air drying. The anti-inflammatory activity and chemical properties of the extracts were analyzed using the established methods. Results showed that 95% ethanolic extract of hot air oven-dried leaves had the highest anti-inflammatory activity and total phenolic and lycorine contents. We recommend hot air drying as a preextraction treatment for leaves for its simplicity, best retention of the herbal quality, and suitability for scaling up to an industrial process.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2021/8850744DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7861935PMC
January 2021

Efficacy and Safety of Sahastara Remedy Extract Capsule in Primary Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Double-Blinded Active-Controlled Trial.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2021 18;2021:6635148. Epub 2021 Jan 18.

Department of Applied Thai Traditional Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Klongluang, Bangkok, Pathum Thani, Thailand.

Sahastara (SHT) remedy is a Thai traditional medicine described in the Thai National List of Essential Medicine (NLEM) for the relief of muscle pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of SHT remedy extract capsule for treating primary OA. A phase 2, double-blind, randomized, and controlled trial study was used to determine the clinical efficacy and safety of SHT in comparison with diclofenac for the treatment of knee OA. The outcome of reduce pain was measured from VAS, 100 meter time walk, and the WOMAC score of day 14 and day 28 which should reduce significantly when compared with day 0 and should be equal with or better than diclofenac. Blood pressure and blood chemistry values at day 14 and day 28 did not change when compared with day 0. The results found that SHT remedy ethanolic extract capsule can reduce all OA knee scores at day 14 and day 28 significantly when compared with day 0 and also no significant difference with diclofenac ( > 0.05). The SHT also showed safety values on blood pressure and blood chemistry. The SHT was observed that it had no serious side effect. The results of this study are the first report of using the SHT ethanolic extract capsule in the treatment of primary osteoarthritis of the knee. It can be recommended as an anti-inflammatory herbal drug for reducing pain in knee osteoarthritis patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2021/6635148DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7834797PMC
January 2021

Cytotoxic Activity against Breast, Cervical, and Ovarian Cancer Cells and Flavonoid Content of Plant Ingredients Used in a Selected Thai Traditional Cancer Remedy: Correlation and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2020 17;2020:8884529. Epub 2020 Nov 17.

Department of Agricultural Food and Nutritional Science, Faculty of Agricultural Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.

This study aimed to investigate cytotoxic activity of selected plant ingredients from a traditional Thai remedy for the treatment of cancer patients against cancer cells occurring in women such as MCF-7 (breast cancer), SKOV3 (ovarian cancer), and HeLa (cervical cancer) cell lines. The plants and the remedy were macerated with 95% ethanol and boiled in water. Cytotoxic activity of the extracts was analyzed by SRB assay. Total flavonoid contents of the extracts were determined and their correlation with cytotoxic activity was evaluated. The hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was used to classify the extracts by their cytotoxic characteristics. A total of 66.7% of the plants was active against the tested cancer cell lines. Among the 44 plants in the remedy used for cancer treatment, nine plants that are also used in Thai cuisine exerted significant cytotoxicity against tested cancer cell lines. Eleven plants in the remedy were active against at least one of the tested cancer cell lines. All extracts were grouped into three groups and illustrated as heat map and hierarchical dendrogram. Total flavonoid content showed weak or no correlation with cytotoxic activity. and selectively exerted potent cytotoxic activity against MCF-7 with SI value more than 6. , , and exerted moderate cytotoxicity to all tested cell with low toxicity to normal cells. The correlation and HCA performed in this study provided an alternative way to investigate biological activities of plant ingredients in polyherbal traditional remedies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2020/8884529DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7685824PMC
November 2020

Ethnopharmacological analysis from Thai traditional medicine called prasachandaeng remedy as a potential antipyretic drug.

J Ethnopharmacol 2021 Mar 29;268:113520. Epub 2020 Oct 29.

Center of Excellence in Applied Thai Traditional Medicine Research (CEATMR), Thammasat University (Rangsit Campus), Klongluang, Pathumthani, 12120, Thailand; Professor Emeritus, Department of Agricultural Food and Nutritional Science, Faculty of Agricultural Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Bualuang ASEAN Chair Professor, Thammasat University, Canada. Electronic address:

Ethnopharmacological Relevance: Prasachandaeng (PSD) remedy is a famous antipyretic drug for adults and children in Thai traditional medicine used and is described in Thailand's National List of Essential Medicine. Relationship between the taste of this herbal medicine, ethnopharmacological used and its pharmacological properties was reviewed.

Aims Of Study: Since there has been no scientific report on the antipyretic activity of PSD, aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy related antipyretic drug of the remedy and its 12 herbal ingredients. It involved quality evaluation of raw materials, extraction of PSD and its ingredients, in vitro evaluation of their inhibitory activities on fever mediators, i.e. NO and PGE production in murine macrophage (RAW 264.7) cell line stimulated by lipopolysaccharide, and its stability study of the 95% ethanolic extract of PSD remedy.

Materials And Methods: PSD remedy was extracted by maceration with 50% and 95% ethanol (PSD50 and PSD95), by decoction with distilled water (PSDW), and hydrolysis of PSDW with 0.1 N HCl (PSDH). The 12 plant ingredients were extracted with 95% ethanol. Quality evaluation of PSD ingredients was performed according to the standard procedures for the quality control of herbal materials. The inhibitory activity on nitric oxide production was determined by the Griess reaction and the inhibition of prostaglandin E production was determined using the ELISA test kit.

Results: PSD ingredients passed the quality standard stipulated for herbal materials. PSD95 exhibited the highest inhibitory activities on the production of NO and PGE with the IC values of 42.40 ± 0.72 and 4.65 ± 0.76 μg/mL, respectively. A standard drug acetaminophen (ACP) exhibited inhibition of NO and PGE production with the IC values of 99.50 ± 0.43 and 6.110 ± 0.661 μg/mL, respectively. The stability study was suggested two years shelf-life of PSD95. This is the first report on the activity related antipyretic activity of PSD remedy and its ingredients against two fever mediators, NO and PGE.

Conclusion: The results suggested that the 95% ethanolic extracts of PSD remedy and some of its ingredients, were better than ACP in reducing fever. PSD should be further studied using in vivo models and clinical trials to support its use as an antipyretic drug in Thai traditional medicine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2020.113520DOI Listing
March 2021

Bactericidal Effect and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Heartwood Extract.

ScientificWorldJournal 2020 13;2020:1653180. Epub 2020 Jul 13.

Department of Applied Thai Traditional Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Khlong Nueng, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand.

Natural products are used as alternative drugs in traditional medicine to treat infection and inflammation and relieve pain. Heartwood of Craib has been investigated as an ingredient in Thai traditional medicine for anti-HIV protease, but there is no report on its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities. The objectives of this study were to investigate the anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities, time-kill profile, and main active constituents of an ethanolic extract of heartwood. The study followed the generally accepted experimental design. All tests were investigated in triplicate. The heartwood of was extracted by maceration with 95% EtOH. The antibacterial activity of the extract and its chemical constituents were determined by their MIC values using resazurin as an indicator. Time-kill profile was determined at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 24 hrs and expressed as log CFU/mL. The anti-inflammatory activity of the extract and its chemical components was investigated by their inhibiting effect on IL-6 and TNF- production by ELISA. The ethanolic extract was analyzed for its chemical constituents by HPLC technique. The ethanolic extract showed both dose- and time-dependent bactericidal effects against , methicillin-resistance , , , , Typhi, Typhimurium, , and with MIC values of 312.5, 312.5, 312.5, 1,250, 2,500, 625, 625, 2,500, and 625 g/mL, respectively. It showed an inhibiting effect on IL-6 production at concentrations of 12.5 to 100 g/mL. The main active chemical constituent of was piceatannol that showed antibacterial activity against all test bacteria except . showed a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Piceatannol and resveratrol from the plant strongly inhibited IL-6 production. Based on these results, we concluded that the ethanolic extract of showed both an antibacterial activity and inhibition of IL-6. Piceatannol is the active constituent of the extract and showed anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2020/1653180DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7374238PMC
July 2020

and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Benjakul: A Potential Medicinal Product from Thai Traditional Medicine.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2020 14;2020:9760948. Epub 2020 Jul 14.

Department of Agricultural Food and Nutritional Science, Faculty of Agricultural Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2P5, Canada.

Benjakul (BJK) is a Thai traditional remedy consisting of five plants: Hunt., Roxb., Opiz., Linn., and Roscoe. It is used as a first-line drug to balance patient's symptoms before other treatments. BJK ethanolic extract has been reported to show anti-inflammatory activity through various mediators, e.g., nitric oxide, TNF-, IL-1, and IL-6. Therefore, BJK could serve as a potential novel anti-inflammatory herbal medicine. However, studies on prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), one of the key mediators in acute inflammation, and anti-inflammation in animal models () have not been done. This study investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of BJK extract and some of its chemical compounds against PGE2 production in murine macrophage (RAW 264.7) cell line and two models of anti-inflammatory studies. Ethanolic extract of BJK (BJK[E]) showed high inhibitory activity against PGE2 production with an IC value of 5.82 ± 0.10 g/mL but its water extract (BJK[W]) was inactive. Two chemicals from BJK[E], i.e., plumbagin and myristicin, which served as biological markers, showed strong activity with IC values of 0.08 ± 0.01 and 1.80 ± 0.06 g/mL, respectively. BJK[E] was administered both topically and orally to rats inhibited with inflammation induced by ethyl phenylpropiolate (rat ear edema model) and carrageenan (hind paw edema model). Moreover, the biological activity of BJK extract did not reduce after six-month storage under accelerated condition (40°C, 75% RH). This indicated its stability and a 24-month shelf-life under normal condition. These results supported not only the use of BJK in Thai traditional medicine but also the possibility of further development of phytopharmaceutical products from BJK.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2020/9760948DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7376408PMC
July 2020

Wound Healing Activities of Three Most Commonly Used Thai Medicinal Plants and Their Three Markers.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2020 29;2020:6795383. Epub 2020 Jun 29.

Department of Agricultural Food and Nutritional Science, Faculty of Agricultural Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2P5, Canada.

Skin ensures that a constant internal environment can be maintained in an ever-changing external environment. When a wound occurs on the skin, the inflammatory and proliferative phases are initiated in response to injury. Thai traditional medicine (TTM), using medicinal plants and ancient knowledge, has been used to treat wounds. Eight Thai medicinal plants, most commonly used to treat wounds, were evaluated for their biological activities such as antioxidation by NBT assay, anti-inflammation by production inhibition of NO, promoting fibroblast cell proliferation, and wound closure activities. Plant materials were extracted with 95% ethanol or distilled water and then concentrated and dried. Statistical analysis of data was done using one-way ANOVA at value of 0.05. The ethanolic extracts of L., L., and L. could inhibit the production of superoxide anion with the IC values of 13.97 ± 0.38, 28.62 ± 1.91, and 71.54 ± 3.22 g/ml and nitric oxide with the IC values of 23.97 ± 0.91, 46.35 ± 0.43, and 78.48 ± 4.46 g/ml, respectively. These extracts could promote cell proliferation and accelerate wound recovery at the rate of 2.02 ± 0.03, 2.12 ± 0.03, and 2.65 ± 0.05% per hour, respectively. Three established markers from these three plants were selected according to the selection criteria. Alpha-mangostin, glycyrrhizin, and thymoquinone were found to be the active markers for wound closure activities. The ethanolic extracts of . , . , and . could scavenge superoxide anion and inhibit the production of nitric oxide; therefore these extracts could assist in surpassing the inflammatory phase and protected the cells surrounding the wound area. Most importantly, these extracts also increased the proliferation and accelerated wound closure, indicating that these plant extracts could be promoting wound healing processes and support the use of TTM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2020/6795383DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7341384PMC
June 2020

Antimicrobial activity of vanillin against spoilage microorganisms in stored fresh-cut mangoes.

J Food Prot 2006 Jul;69(7):1724-7

Faculty of Technology, Khon Kaen University, 40002, Thailand.

The antimicrobial activity of vanillin against four bacteria (Pantoea agglomerans, Aeromonas enteropelogenes, Micrococcus lylae, and Sphingobacterium spiritovorun), four fungi (Alternaria sp., Aspergillus sp., Penicillium sp., and Fusarium sp.), and three unidentified yeasts isolated from spoiling fresh-cut mango slices was verified in laboratory media adjusted to pH 5.0. MICs of vanillin against the fungi (12.5 to 13.3 mM), bacteria (10 to 13.3 mM), and yeasts (5.0 to 6.7 mM) indicated that all the test species were sensitive to the antimicrobial effects of vanillin. Fresh-cut mango slices were dipped for 1 min in solutions containing 40 and 80 mM vanillin before being packaged in rigid trays and stored at 5 and 10 degrees C to verify the effects of vanillin on the development of the spoilage microflora. Microbiological analysis for up to 14 days of storage revealed that treatment with 80 mM vanillin significantly delayed (P < 0.05) the development of total aerobic bacteria and yeast and mold populations. Vanillin may be a practical preservative for processing fresh-cut mango.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4315/0362-028x-69.7.1724DOI Listing
July 2006

Supercritical fluid extraction of alkylamides from Echinacea angustifolia.

J Agric Food Chem 2002 Jul;50(14):3947-53

Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2P5.

Echinacea has been known for its immunostimulatory activity, and its alkylamide components have been linked to such biological activity. Consequently, alkylamides in Echinacea angustifolia were extracted using supercritical carbon dioxide from fresh and dried roots at 45-60 degrees C and 34-55 MPa, and the alkylamide yield in the extracts was determined. The yield of alkylamides from fresh roots increased with temperature yet decreased with pressure, whereas the yield from air-dried roots (moisture content 8.4%) increased with both temperature and pressure. Freeze-drying of the roots to a moisture content of 4.9% did not result in any further increase in the yield compared to that of air-dried roots. Alkylamide yield of the ground dried roots extract was the highest (p < or = 0.05) among those from fresh, ground and unground E. angustifolia roots. Supercritical fluid extraction therefore shows potential for the recovery of alkylamides from dried Echinacea roots.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf0200265DOI Listing
July 2002