Publications by authors named "Bryan R Aaldering"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Identification of the Best Direct-Acting Antiviral Regimen for Patients With Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 3 Infection: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis.

Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2017 03 10;15(3):349-359. Epub 2016 Nov 10.

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

Background & Aims: Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) are effective in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, although results for patients infected with genotype 3 are suboptimal. There are several regimens available, however, direct comparisons have not been made and are unlikely to occur. We aimed to identify the most effective DAA regimen for patients infected with HCV genotype 3 and to assess the role of ribavirin.

Methods: We conducted a systematic search of PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases through March 2016. We performed a Bayesian network meta-analysis using a random-effects model to indirectly compare regimens in patients with and without cirrhosis. We calculated mean estimated sustained virologic response (SVR) with 95% credible intervals (95% CrI) per regimen and effect of ribavirin as odds ratio. We focused on current recommended regimens and regimens under evaluation by regulatory authorities.

Results: Our search identified 2167 articles; 27 studies (comprising 3415 patients) were included. Among patients without cirrhosis, the greatest rates of SVR were estimated for those receiving sofosbuvir + velpatasvir with ribavirin (99%; 95% CrI, 98%-100%) and without ribavirin (97%; 95% CrI, 95%-99%), sofosbuvir + daclatasvir + ribavirin (96%; 95% CrI, 92%-98%), and sofosbuvir + peginterferon + ribavirin (95%; 95% CrI, 91%-98%), all for 12 weeks. Among patients with cirrhosis, the highest rates of SVR were estimated for those receiving sofosbuvir + velpatasvir for 24 weeks (96%; 95% CrI, 92%-99%), sofosbuvir + daclatasvir + ribavirin for 24 weeks (94%; 95% CrI, 87%-98%), and sofosbuvir + velpatasvir + ribavirin for 12 weeks (94%; 95% CrI, 86%-98%). Ribavirin increases efficacy in patients with and without cirrhosis (odds ratio, 2.6-4.5).

Conclusions: An indirect comparison of DAA-based treatments, using Bayesian network meta-analysis, found regimens containing sofosbuvir and velpatasvir to be the best option for patients with HCV genotype 3 infection. Our analyses indicated that ribavirin significantly increases SVR rates and should be considered if tolerated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cgh.2016.10.034DOI Listing
March 2017

Antidepressants and gastrointestinal symptoms in the general Dutch adult population.

J Clin Psychopharmacol 2014 Feb;34(1):66-71

From the *Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen; †Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht; ‡Department of Cardiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen; §Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Elkerliek Hospital, Helmond; and ∥Department for Health Evidence, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; and ¶Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA.

Background: Gastrointestinal symptoms are frequently reported adverse effects of antidepressants, but antidepressants are also a treatment modality in functional gastrointestinal disorders. We aimed to assess the association between antidepressant use and gastrointestinal symptoms in the general adult population.

Methods: We assessed gastrointestinal symptoms, medication use, and comorbidity through structured questionnaires in randomly selected individuals. We compared presence of gastrointestinal symptoms in respondents who reported antidepressant use with those who did not. We used multivariable regression analysis to verify the association between antidepressant use and gastrointestinal symptoms.

Results: In total, 16,758 questionnaires were returned and eligible for analysis. Antidepressant use was reported by 701 respondents (4.2%). Gastrointestinal symptoms were more frequently reported by antidepressant users compared with nonusers (40% vs 25%, P < 0.01). This apparent association between antidepressant use and gastrointestinal symptoms did not remain after adjusting for demographic factors, comorbidity, and use of other medications (adjusted odds ratio, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.74-1.18).

Conclusions: In our cross-sectional population-based study, we did not find an association between antidepressant use and gastrointestinal symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JCP.0000000000000055DOI Listing
February 2014
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