Publications by authors named "Brian E Cade"

56 Publications

Genetic discovery and risk characterization in type 2 diabetes across diverse populations.

HGG Adv 2021 Apr 9;2(2). Epub 2021 Mar 9.

Division of Statistical Genomics, School of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA.

Genomic discovery and characterization of risk loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been conducted primarily in individuals of European ancestry. We conducted a multiethnic genome-wide association study of T2D among 53,102 cases and 193,679 control subjects from African, Hispanic, Asian, Native Hawaiian, and European population groups in the Population Architecture Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) and Diabetes Genetics Replication and Meta-analysis (DIAGRAM) Consortia. In individuals of African ancestry, we discovered a risk variant in the gene (rs11466334, risk allele frequency (RAF) = 6.8%, odds ratio [OR] = 1.27, p = 2.06 × 10), which replicated in independent studies of African ancestry (p = 6.26 × 10). We identified a multiethnic risk variant in the gene (rs13052926, RAF = 14.1%, OR = 1.08, p = 5.75 × 10), which also replicated in independent studies (p = 3.45 × 10). We also observed a significant difference in the performance of a multiethnic genetic risk score (GRS) across population groups (p = 3.85 × 10). Comparing individuals in the top GRS risk category (40%-60%), the OR was highest in Asians (OR = 3.08) and European (OR = 2.94) ancestry populations, followed by Hispanic (OR = 2.39), Native Hawaiian (OR = 2.02), and African ancestry (OR = 1.57) populations. These findings underscore the importance of genetic discovery and risk characterization in diverse populations and the urgent need to further increase representation of non-European ancestry individuals in genetics research to improve genetic-based risk prediction across populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.xhgg.2021.100029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8486151PMC
April 2021

Associations of sleep duration and sleep-wake rhythm with lung parenchymal abnormalities on computed tomography: The MESA study.

J Sleep Res 2021 Sep 9:e13475. Epub 2021 Sep 9.

Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Impairment of the circadian rhythm promotes lung inflammation and fibrosis in pre-clinical models. We aimed to examine whether short and/or long sleep duration and other markers of sleep-wake patterns are associated with a greater burden of lung parenchymal abnormalities on computed tomography among adults. We cross-sectionally examined associations of sleep duration captured by actigraphy with interstitial lung abnormalities (n = 1111) and high attenuation areas (n = 1416) on computed tomography scan in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis at Exam 5 (2010-2013). We adjusted for potential confounders in logistic and linear regression models for interstitial lung abnormalities and high attenuation area, respectively. High attenuation area models were also adjusted for study site, lung volume imaged, radiation dose and stratified by body mass index. Secondary exposures were self-reported sleep duration, sleep fragmentation index, sleep midpoint and chronotype. The mean age of those with longer sleep duration (≥ 8 hr) was 70 years and the prevalence of interstitial lung abnormalities was 14%. Increasing actigraphy-based sleep duration among participants with ≥ 8 hr of sleep was associated with a higher adjusted odds of interstitial lung abnormalities (odds ratio of 2.66 per 1-hr increment, 95% confidence interval 1.42-4.99). Longer sleep duration and higher sleep fragmentation index were associated with greater high attenuation area on computed tomography among participants with a body mass index < 25 kg m (p-value for interaction < 0.02). Self-reported sleep duration, later sleep midpoint and evening chronotype were not associated with outcomes. Actigraphy-based longer sleep duration and sleep fragmentation were associated with a greater burden of lung abnormalities on computed tomography scan.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jsr.13475DOI Listing
September 2021

Whole-genome association analyses of sleep-disordered breathing phenotypes in the NHLBI TOPMed program.

Genome Med 2021 08 26;13(1):136. Epub 2021 Aug 26.

Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, 10461, USA.

Background: Sleep-disordered breathing is a common disorder associated with significant morbidity. The genetic architecture of sleep-disordered breathing remains poorly understood. Through the NHLBI Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) program, we performed the first whole-genome sequence analysis of sleep-disordered breathing.

Methods: The study sample was comprised of 7988 individuals of diverse ancestry. Common-variant and pathway analyses included an additional 13,257 individuals. We examined five complementary traits describing different aspects of sleep-disordered breathing: the apnea-hypopnea index, average oxyhemoglobin desaturation per event, average and minimum oxyhemoglobin saturation across the sleep episode, and the percentage of sleep with oxyhemoglobin saturation < 90%. We adjusted for age, sex, BMI, study, and family structure using MMSKAT and EMMAX mixed linear model approaches. Additional bioinformatics analyses were performed with MetaXcan, GIGSEA, and ReMap.

Results: We identified a multi-ethnic set-based rare-variant association (p = 3.48 × 10) on chromosome X with ARMCX3. Additional rare-variant associations include ARMCX3-AS1, MRPS33, and C16orf90. Novel common-variant loci were identified in the NRG1 and SLC45A2 regions, and previously associated loci in the IL18RAP and ATP2B4 regions were associated with novel phenotypes. Transcription factor binding site enrichment identified associations with genes implicated with respiratory and craniofacial traits. Additional analyses identified significantly associated pathways.

Conclusions: We have identified the first gene-based rare-variant associations with objectively measured sleep-disordered breathing traits. Our results increase the understanding of the genetic architecture of sleep-disordered breathing and highlight associations in genes that modulate lung development, inflammation, respiratory rhythmogenesis, and HIF1A-mediated hypoxic response.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13073-021-00917-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8394596PMC
August 2021

Rare Coding Variants Associated With Electrocardiographic Intervals Identify Monogenic Arrhythmia Susceptibility Genes: A Multi-Ancestry Analysis.

Circ Genom Precis Med 2021 08 28;14(4):e003300. Epub 2021 Jul 28.

Regeneron Genetics Center, Tarrytown, NY. Departments of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (S.R.).

Background: Alterations in electrocardiographic (ECG) intervals are well-known markers for arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death (SCD) risk. While the genetics of arrhythmia syndromes have been studied, relations between electrocardiographic intervals and rare genetic variation at a population level are poorly understood.

Methods: Using a discovery sample of 29 000 individuals with whole-genome sequencing from Trans-Omics in Precision Medicine and replication in nearly 100 000 with whole-exome sequencing from the UK Biobank and MyCode, we examined associations between low-frequency and rare coding variants with 5 routinely measured electrocardiographic traits (RR, P-wave, PR, and QRS intervals and corrected QT interval).

Results: We found that rare variants associated with population-based electrocardiographic intervals identify established monogenic SCD genes (, , and ), a controversial monogenic SCD gene (), and novel genes ( and ) involved in cardiac conduction. Loss-of-function and pathogenic variants, carried by 0.1% of individuals, were associated with a nearly 6-fold increased odds of the first-degree atrioventricular block (=8.4×10). Similar variants in and (0.2% of individuals) were associated with a 23-fold increased odds of marked corrected QT interval prolongation (=4×10), a marker of SCD risk. Incomplete penetrance of such deleterious variation was common as over 70% of carriers had normal electrocardiographic intervals.

Conclusions: Our findings indicate that large-scale high-depth sequence data and electrocardiographic analysis identifies monogenic arrhythmia susceptibility genes and rare variants with large effects. Known pathogenic variation in conventional arrhythmia and SCD genes exhibited incomplete penetrance and accounted for only a small fraction of marked electrocardiographic interval prolongation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCGEN.120.003300DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8373440PMC
August 2021

Presence and transmission of mitochondrial heteroplasmic mutations in human populations of European and African ancestry.

Mitochondrion 2021 Sep 21;60:33-42. Epub 2021 Jul 21.

Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA 01702, USA; Population Sciences Branch, NHLBI/NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

We investigated the concordance of mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmic mutations (heteroplasmies) in 6745 maternal pairs of European (EA, n = 4718 pairs) and African (AA, n = 2027 pairs) Americans in whole blood. Mother-offspring pairs displayed the highest concordance rate, followed by sibling-sibling and more distantly-related maternal pairs. The allele fractions of concordant heteroplasmies exhibited high correlation (R = 0.8) between paired individuals. Discordant heteroplasmies were more likely to be in coding regions, be nonsynonymous or nonsynonymous-deleterious (p < 0.001). The number of deleterious heteroplasmies was significantly correlated with advancing age (20-44, 45-64, and ≥65 years, p-trend = 0.01). One standard deviation increase in heteroplasmic burden (i.e., the number of heteroplasmies carried by an individual) was associated with 0.17 to 0.26 (p < 1e - 23) standard deviation decrease in mtDNA copy number, independent of age. White blood cell count and differential count jointly explained 0.5% to 1.3% (p ≤ 0.001) variance in heteroplasmic burden. A genome-wide association and meta-analysis identified a region at 11p11.12 (top signal rs779031139, p = 2.0e - 18, minor allele frequency = 0.38) associated with the heteroplasmic burden. However, the 11p11.12 region is adjacent to a nuclear mitochondrial DNA (NUMT) corresponding to a 542 bp area of the D-loop. This region was no longer significant after excluding heteroplasmies within the 542 bp from the heteroplasmic burden. The discovery that blood mtDNA heteroplasmies were both inherited and somatic origins and that an increase in heteroplasmic burden was strongly associated with a decrease in average number of mtDNA copy number in blood are important findings to be considered in association studies of mtDNA with disease traits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mito.2021.07.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8464516PMC
September 2021

The trans-ancestral genomic architecture of glycemic traits.

Nat Genet 2021 06 31;53(6):840-860. Epub 2021 May 31.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.

Glycemic traits are used to diagnose and monitor type 2 diabetes and cardiometabolic health. To date, most genetic studies of glycemic traits have focused on individuals of European ancestry. Here we aggregated genome-wide association studies comprising up to 281,416 individuals without diabetes (30% non-European ancestry) for whom fasting glucose, 2-h glucose after an oral glucose challenge, glycated hemoglobin and fasting insulin data were available. Trans-ancestry and single-ancestry meta-analyses identified 242 loci (99 novel; P < 5 × 10), 80% of which had no significant evidence of between-ancestry heterogeneity. Analyses restricted to individuals of European ancestry with equivalent sample size would have led to 24 fewer new loci. Compared with single-ancestry analyses, equivalent-sized trans-ancestry fine-mapping reduced the number of estimated variants in 99% credible sets by a median of 37.5%. Genomic-feature, gene-expression and gene-set analyses revealed distinct biological signatures for each trait, highlighting different underlying biological pathways. Our results increase our understanding of diabetes pathophysiology by using trans-ancestry studies for improved power and resolution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-021-00852-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7610958PMC
June 2021

A System for Phenotype Harmonization in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program.

Am J Epidemiol 2021 10;190(10):1977-1992

Genotype-phenotype association studies often combine phenotype data from multiple studies to increase statistical power. Harmonization of the data usually requires substantial effort due to heterogeneity in phenotype definitions, study design, data collection procedures, and data-set organization. Here we describe a centralized system for phenotype harmonization that includes input from phenotype domain and study experts, quality control, documentation, reproducible results, and data-sharing mechanisms. This system was developed for the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) program, which is generating genomic and other -omics data for more than 80 studies with extensive phenotype data. To date, 63 phenotypes have been harmonized across thousands of participants (recruited in 1948-2012) from up to 17 studies per phenotype. Here we discuss challenges in this undertaking and how they were addressed. The harmonized phenotype data and associated documentation have been submitted to National Institutes of Health data repositories for controlled access by the scientific community. We also provide materials to facilitate future harmonization efforts by the community, which include 1) the software code used to generate the 63 harmonized phenotypes, enabling others to reproduce, modify, or extend these harmonizations to additional studies, and 2) the results of labeling thousands of phenotype variables with controlled vocabulary terms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwab115DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8485147PMC
October 2021

Multi-ancestry genome-wide gene-sleep interactions identify novel loci for blood pressure.

Mol Psychiatry 2021 Apr 15. Epub 2021 Apr 15.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Long and short sleep duration are associated with elevated blood pressure (BP), possibly through effects on molecular pathways that influence neuroendocrine and vascular systems. To gain new insights into the genetic basis of sleep-related BP variation, we performed genome-wide gene by short or long sleep duration interaction analyses on four BP traits (systolic BP, diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure) across five ancestry groups in two stages using 2 degree of freedom (df) joint test followed by 1df test of interaction effects. Primary multi-ancestry analysis in 62,969 individuals in stage 1 identified three novel gene by sleep interactions that were replicated in an additional 59,296 individuals in stage 2 (stage 1 + 2 P < 5 × 10), including rs7955964 (FIGNL2/ANKRD33) that increases BP among long sleepers, and rs73493041 (SNORA26/C9orf170) and rs10406644 (KCTD15/LSM14A) that increase BP among short sleepers (P < 5 × 10). Secondary ancestry-specific analysis identified another novel gene by long sleep interaction at rs111887471 (TRPC3/KIAA1109) in individuals of African ancestry (P = 2 × 10). Combined stage 1 and 2 analyses additionally identified significant gene by long sleep interactions at 10 loci including MKLN1 and RGL3/ELAVL3 previously associated with BP, and significant gene by short sleep interactions at 10 loci including C2orf43 previously associated with BP (P < 10). 2df test also identified novel loci for BP after modeling sleep that has known functions in sleep-wake regulation, nervous and cardiometabolic systems. This study indicates that sleep and primary mechanisms regulating BP may interact to elevate BP level, suggesting novel insights into sleep-related BP regulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41380-021-01087-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8517040PMC
April 2021

Chromosome Xq23 is associated with lower atherogenic lipid concentrations and favorable cardiometabolic indices.

Nat Commun 2021 04 12;12(1):2182. Epub 2021 Apr 12.

Division of Cardiology, George Washington University School of Medicine and Healthcare Sciences, Washington, DC, USA.

Autosomal genetic analyses of blood lipids have yielded key insights for coronary heart disease (CHD). However, X chromosome genetic variation is understudied for blood lipids in large sample sizes. We now analyze genetic and blood lipid data in a high-coverage whole X chromosome sequencing study of 65,322 multi-ancestry participants and perform replication among 456,893 European participants. Common alleles on chromosome Xq23 are strongly associated with reduced total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides (min P = 8.5 × 10), with similar effects for males and females. Chromosome Xq23 lipid-lowering alleles are associated with reduced odds for CHD among 42,545 cases and 591,247 controls (P = 1.7 × 10), and reduced odds for diabetes mellitus type 2 among 54,095 cases and 573,885 controls (P = 1.4 × 10). Although we observe an association with increased BMI, waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI is reduced, bioimpedance analyses indicate increased gluteofemoral fat, and abdominal MRI analyses indicate reduced visceral adiposity. Co-localization analyses strongly correlate increased CHRDL1 gene expression, particularly in adipose tissue, with reduced concentrations of blood lipids.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-22339-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8042019PMC
April 2021

Robust, flexible, and scalable tests for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium across diverse ancestries.

Genetics 2021 05;218(1)

Department of Biochemistry, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA.

Traditional Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) tests (the χ2 test and the exact test) have long been used as a metric for evaluating genotype quality, as technical artifacts leading to incorrect genotype calls often can be identified as deviations from HWE. However, in data sets composed of individuals from diverse ancestries, HWE can be violated even without genotyping error, complicating the use of HWE testing to assess genotype data quality. In this manuscript, we present the Robust Unified Test for HWE (RUTH) to test for HWE while accounting for population structure and genotype uncertainty, and to evaluate the impact of population heterogeneity and genotype uncertainty on the standard HWE tests and alternative methods using simulated and real sequence data sets. Our results demonstrate that ignoring population structure or genotype uncertainty in HWE tests can inflate false-positive rates by many orders of magnitude. Our evaluations demonstrate different tradeoffs between false positives and statistical power across the methods, with RUTH consistently among the best across all evaluations. RUTH is implemented as a practical and scalable software tool to rapidly perform HWE tests across millions of markers and hundreds of thousands of individuals while supporting standard VCF/BCF formats. RUTH is publicly available at https://www.github.com/statgen/ruth.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/genetics/iyab044DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8128395PMC
May 2021

Discovery and fine-mapping of height loci via high-density imputation of GWASs in individuals of African ancestry.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 04 12;108(4):564-582. Epub 2021 Mar 12.

The Charles R. Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA.

Although many loci have been associated with height in European ancestry populations, very few have been identified in African ancestry individuals. Furthermore, many of the known loci have yet to be generalized to and fine-mapped within a large-scale African ancestry sample. We performed sex-combined and sex-stratified meta-analyses in up to 52,764 individuals with height and genome-wide genotyping data from the African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium (AAAGC). We additionally combined our African ancestry meta-analysis results with published European genome-wide association study (GWAS) data. In the African ancestry analyses, we identified three novel loci (SLC4A3, NCOA2, ECD/FAM149B1) in sex-combined results and two loci (CRB1, KLF6) in women only. In the African plus European sex-combined GWAS, we identified an additional three novel loci (RCCD1, G6PC3, CEP95) which were equally driven by AAAGC and European results. Among 39 genome-wide significant signals at known loci, conditioning index SNPs from European studies identified 20 secondary signals. Two of the 20 new secondary signals and none of the 8 novel loci had minor allele frequencies (MAF) < 5%. Of 802 known European height signals, 643 displayed directionally consistent associations with height, of which 205 were nominally significant (p < 0.05) in the African ancestry sex-combined sample. Furthermore, 148 of 241 loci contained ≤20 variants in the credible sets that jointly account for 99% of the posterior probability of driving the associations. In summary, trans-ethnic meta-analyses revealed novel signals and further improved fine-mapping of putative causal variants in loci shared between African and European ancestry populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.02.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8059339PMC
April 2021

Sequencing of 53,831 diverse genomes from the NHLBI TOPMed Program.

Nature 2021 02 10;590(7845):290-299. Epub 2021 Feb 10.

The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, USA.

The Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) programme seeks to elucidate the genetic architecture and biology of heart, lung, blood and sleep disorders, with the ultimate goal of improving diagnosis, treatment and prevention of these diseases. The initial phases of the programme focused on whole-genome sequencing of individuals with rich phenotypic data and diverse backgrounds. Here we describe the TOPMed goals and design as well as the available resources and early insights obtained from the sequence data. The resources include a variant browser, a genotype imputation server, and genomic and phenotypic data that are available through dbGaP (Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes). In the first 53,831 TOPMed samples, we detected more than 400 million single-nucleotide and insertion or deletion variants after alignment with the reference genome. Additional previously undescribed variants were detected through assembly of unmapped reads and customized analysis in highly variable loci. Among the more than 400 million detected variants, 97% have frequencies of less than 1% and 46% are singletons that are present in only one individual (53% among unrelated individuals). These rare variants provide insights into mutational processes and recent human evolutionary history. The extensive catalogue of genetic variation in TOPMed studies provides unique opportunities for exploring the contributions of rare and noncoding sequence variants to phenotypic variation. Furthermore, combining TOPMed haplotypes with modern imputation methods improves the power and reach of genome-wide association studies to include variants down to a frequency of approximately 0.01%.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03205-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7875770PMC
February 2021

Inherited causes of clonal haematopoiesis in 97,691 whole genomes.

Nature 2020 10 14;586(7831):763-768. Epub 2020 Oct 14.

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Age is the dominant risk factor for most chronic human diseases, but the mechanisms through which ageing confers this risk are largely unknown. The age-related acquisition of somatic mutations that lead to clonal expansion in regenerating haematopoietic stem cell populations has recently been associated with both haematological cancer and coronary heart disease-this phenomenon is termed clonal haematopoiesis of indeterminate potential (CHIP). Simultaneous analyses of germline and somatic whole-genome sequences provide the opportunity to identify root causes of CHIP. Here we analyse high-coverage whole-genome sequences from 97,691 participants of diverse ancestries in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Trans-omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) programme, and identify 4,229 individuals with CHIP. We identify associations with blood cell, lipid and inflammatory traits that are specific to different CHIP driver genes. Association of a genome-wide set of germline genetic variants enabled the identification of three genetic loci associated with CHIP status, including one locus at TET2 that was specific to individuals of African ancestry. In silico-informed in vitro evaluation of the TET2 germline locus enabled the identification of a causal variant that disrupts a TET2 distal enhancer, resulting in increased self-renewal of haematopoietic stem cells. Overall, we observe that germline genetic variation shapes haematopoietic stem cell function, leading to CHIP through mechanisms that are specific to clonal haematopoiesis as well as shared mechanisms that lead to somatic mutations across tissues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2819-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7944936PMC
October 2020

Whole genome sequence analysis of pulmonary function and COPD in 19,996 multi-ethnic participants.

Nat Commun 2020 10 14;11(1):5182. Epub 2020 Oct 14.

The Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, The Department of Pediatrics, The Lundquist Institute for Biomedical Innovation at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, 90502, USA.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diagnosed by reduced lung function, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. We performed whole genome sequence (WGS) analysis of lung function and COPD in a multi-ethnic sample of 11,497 participants from population- and family-based studies, and 8499 individuals from COPD-enriched studies in the NHLBI Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program. We identify at genome-wide significance 10 known GWAS loci and 22 distinct, previously unreported loci, including two common variant signals from stratified analysis of African Americans. Four novel common variants within the regions of PIAS1, RGN (two variants) and FTO show evidence of replication in the UK Biobank (European ancestry n ~ 320,000), while colocalization analyses leveraging multi-omic data from GTEx and TOPMed identify potential molecular mechanisms underlying four of the 22 novel loci. Our study demonstrates the value of performing WGS analyses and multi-omic follow-up in cohorts of diverse ancestry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-18334-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7598941PMC
October 2020

Sleep health, diseases, and pain syndromes: findings from an electronic health record biobank.

Sleep 2021 03;44(3)

Mass General Brigham Personalized Medicine, Mass General Brigham, Boston, MA.

Study Objectives: Implementation of electronic health record biobanks has facilitated linkage between clinical and questionnaire data and enabled assessments of relationships between sleep health and diseases in phenome-wide association studies (PheWAS). In the Mass General Brigham Biobank, a large health system-based study, we aimed to systematically catalog associations between time in bed, sleep timing, and weekly variability with clinical phenotypes derived from ICD-9/10 codes.

Methods: Self-reported habitual bed and wake times were used to derive variables: short (<7 hours) and long (≥9 hours) time in bed, sleep midpoint, social jetlag, and sleep debt. Logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models were used to test cross-sectional and prospective associations, respectively, adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, and employment status and further adjusted for body mass index.

Results: In cross-sectional analysis (n = 34,651), sleep variable associations were most notable for circulatory system, mental disorders, and endocrine/metabolic phenotypes. We observed the strongest associations for short time in bed with obesity, for long time in bed and sleep midpoint with major depressive disorder, for social jetlag with hypercholesterolemia, and for sleep debt with acne. In prospective analysis (n = 24,065), we observed short time in bed associations with higher incidence of acute pain and later sleep midpoint and higher sleep debt and social jetlag associations with higher incidence of major depressive disorder.

Conclusions: Our analysis reinforced that sleep health is a multidimensional construct, corroborated robust known findings from traditional cohort studies, and supported the application of PheWAS as a promising tool for advancing sleep research. Considering the exploratory nature of PheWAS, careful interrogation of novel findings is imperative.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsaa189DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7953212PMC
March 2021

Sleep Apnea and COVID-19 Mortality and Hospitalization.

Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2020 11;202(10):1462-1464

Brigham and Women's Hospital Boston, Massachusetts.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.202006-2252LEDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7667903PMC
November 2020

Low oxygen saturation during sleep reduces CD1D and RAB20 expressions that are reversed by CPAP therapy.

EBioMedicine 2020 Jun 5;56:102803. Epub 2020 Jun 5.

Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: Sleep Disordered Breathing (SDB) is associated with a wide range of pathophysiological changes due, in part, to hypoxemia during sleep. We sought to identify gene transcription associations with measures of SDB and hypoxemia during sleep, and study their response to treatment.

Methods: In two discovery cohorts, Framingham Offspring Study (FOS; N = 571) and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA; N = 580), we studied gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in association with three measures of SDB: Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI); average oxyhemoglobin saturation (avgO2) during sleep; and minimum oxyhemoglobin saturation (minO2) during sleep. Associated genes were used for analysis of gene expression in the blood of 15 participants with moderate or severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) from the Heart Biomarkers In Apnea Treatment (HeartBEAT) trial. These genes were studied pre- and post-treatment (three months) with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). We also performed Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) on all traits and cohort analyses.

Findings: Twenty-two genes were associated with SDB traits in both MESA and FOS. Of these, lower expression of CD1D and RAB20 was associated with lower avgO2 in MESA and FOS. CPAP treatment increased the expression of these genes in HeartBEAT participants. Immunity and inflammation pathways were up-regulated in subjects with lower avgO2; i.e., in those with a more severe SDB phenotype (MESA), whereas immuno-inflammatory processes were down-regulated following CPAP treatment (HeartBEAT).

Interpretation: Low oxygen saturation during sleep is associated with alterations in gene expression and transcriptional programs that are partially reversed by CPAP treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2020.102803DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7276515PMC
June 2020

De novo mutations across 1,465 diverse genomes reveal mutational insights and reductions in the Amish founder population.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2020 02 21;117(5):2560-2569. Epub 2020 Jan 21.

Institute for Genome Sciences, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201;

De novo mutations (DNMs), or mutations that appear in an individual despite not being seen in their parents, are an important source of genetic variation whose impact is relevant to studies of human evolution, genetics, and disease. Utilizing high-coverage whole-genome sequencing data as part of the Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program, we called 93,325 single-nucleotide DNMs across 1,465 trios from an array of diverse human populations, and used them to directly estimate and analyze DNM counts, rates, and spectra. We find a significant positive correlation between local recombination rate and local DNM rate, and that DNM rate explains a substantial portion (8.98 to 34.92%, depending on the model) of the genome-wide variation in population-level genetic variation from 41K unrelated TOPMed samples. Genome-wide heterozygosity does correlate with DNM rate, but only explains <1% of variation. While we are underpowered to see small differences, we do not find significant differences in DNM rate between individuals of European, African, and Latino ancestry, nor across ancestrally distinct segments within admixed individuals. However, we did find significantly fewer DNMs in Amish individuals, even when compared with other Europeans, and even after accounting for parental age and sequencing center. Specifically, we found significant reductions in the number of C→A and T→C mutations in the Amish, which seem to underpin their overall reduction in DNMs. Finally, we calculated near-zero estimates of narrow sense heritability ( ), which suggest that variation in DNM rate is significantly shaped by nonadditive genetic effects and the environment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1902766117DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7007577PMC
February 2020

Allelic Heterogeneity at the CRP Locus Identified by Whole-Genome Sequencing in Multi-ancestry Cohorts.

Am J Hum Genet 2020 01 26;106(1):112-120. Epub 2019 Dec 26.

Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) can improve assessment of low-frequency and rare variants, particularly in non-European populations that have been underrepresented in existing genomic studies. The genetic determinants of C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker of chronic inflammation, have been extensively studied, with existing genome-wide association studies (GWASs) conducted in >200,000 individuals of European ancestry. In order to discover novel loci associated with CRP levels, we examined a multi-ancestry population (n = 23,279) with WGS (∼38× coverage) from the Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) program. We found evidence for eight distinct associations at the CRP locus, including two variants that have not been identified previously (rs11265259 and rs181704186), both of which are non-coding and more common in individuals of African ancestry (∼10% and ∼1% minor allele frequency, respectively, and rare or monomorphic in 1000 Genomes populations of East Asian, South Asian, and European ancestry). We show that the minor (G) allele of rs181704186 is associated with lower CRP levels and decreased transcriptional activity and protein binding in vitro, providing a plausible molecular mechanism for this African ancestry-specific signal. The individuals homozygous for rs181704186-G have a mean CRP level of 0.23 mg/L, in contrast to individuals heterozygous for rs181704186 with mean CRP of 2.97 mg/L and major allele homozygotes with mean CRP of 4.11 mg/L. This study demonstrates the utility of WGS in multi-ethnic populations to drive discovery of complex trait associations of large effect and to identify functional alleles in noncoding regulatory regions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2019.12.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7042494PMC
January 2020

Multi-ancestry sleep-by-SNP interaction analysis in 126,926 individuals reveals lipid loci stratified by sleep duration.

Nat Commun 2019 11 12;10(1):5121. Epub 2019 Nov 12.

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands.

Both short and long sleep are associated with an adverse lipid profile, likely through different biological pathways. To elucidate the biology of sleep-associated adverse lipid profile, we conduct multi-ancestry genome-wide sleep-SNP interaction analyses on three lipid traits (HDL-c, LDL-c and triglycerides). In the total study sample (discovery + replication) of 126,926 individuals from 5 different ancestry groups, when considering either long or short total sleep time interactions in joint analyses, we identify 49 previously unreported lipid loci, and 10 additional previously unreported lipid loci in a restricted sample of European-ancestry cohorts. In addition, we identify new gene-sleep interactions for known lipid loci such as LPL and PCSK9. The previously unreported lipid loci have a modest explained variance in lipid levels: most notable, gene-short-sleep interactions explain 4.25% of the variance in triglyceride level. Collectively, these findings contribute to our understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in sleep-associated adverse lipid profiles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-12958-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6851116PMC
November 2019

Sequencing Analysis at 8p23 Identifies Multiple Rare Variants in DLC1 Associated with Sleep-Related Oxyhemoglobin Saturation Level.

Am J Hum Genet 2019 11 24;105(5):1057-1068. Epub 2019 Oct 24.

Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Departments of Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Services, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98101, USA; Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA 98101, USA.

Average arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation during sleep (AvSpOS) is a clinically relevant measure of physiological stress associated with sleep-disordered breathing, and this measure predicts incident cardiovascular disease and mortality. Using high-depth whole-genome sequencing data from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) project and focusing on genes with linkage evidence on chromosome 8p23, we observed that six coding and 51 noncoding variants in a gene that encodes the GTPase-activating protein (DLC1) are significantly associated with AvSpOS and replicated in independent subjects. The combined DLC1 association evidence of discovery and replication cohorts reaches genome-wide significance in European Americans (p = 7.9 × 10). A risk score for these variants, built on an independent dataset, explains 0.97% of the AvSpOS variation and contributes to the linkage evidence. The 51 noncoding variants are enriched in regulatory features in a human lung fibroblast cell line and contribute to DLC1 expression variation. Mendelian randomization analysis using these variants indicates a significant causal effect of DLC1 expression in fibroblasts on AvSpOS. Multiple sources of information, including genetic variants, gene expression, and methylation, consistently suggest that DLC1 is a gene associated with AvSpOS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2019.10.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6849112PMC
November 2019

Genome-wide association analysis of self-reported daytime sleepiness identifies 42 loci that suggest biological subtypes.

Nat Commun 2019 08 13;10(1):3503. Epub 2019 Aug 13.

Institute for Molecular Medicine FIMM, HiLIFE, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.

Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) affects 10-20% of the population and is associated with substantial functional deficits. Here, we identify 42 loci for self-reported daytime sleepiness in GWAS of 452,071 individuals from the UK Biobank, with enrichment for genes expressed in brain tissues and in neuronal transmission pathways. We confirm the aggregate effect of a genetic risk score of 42 SNPs on daytime sleepiness in independent Scandinavian cohorts and on other sleep disorders (restless legs syndrome, insomnia) and sleep traits (duration, chronotype, accelerometer-derived sleep efficiency and daytime naps or inactivity). However, individual daytime sleepiness signals vary in their associations with objective short vs long sleep, and with markers of sleep continuity. The 42 sleepiness variants primarily cluster into two predominant composite biological subtypes - sleep propensity and sleep fragmentation. Shared genetic links are also seen with obesity, coronary heart disease, psychiatric diseases, cognitive traits and reproductive ageing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-11456-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6692391PMC
August 2019

Epigenome-wide association analysis of daytime sleepiness in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis reveals African-American-specific associations.

Sleep 2019 08;42(8)

Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.

Study Objectives: Daytime sleepiness is a consequence of inadequate sleep, sleep-wake control disorder, or other medical conditions. Population variability in prevalence of daytime sleepiness is likely due to genetic and biological factors as well as social and environmental influences. DNA methylation (DNAm) potentially influences multiple health outcomes. Here, we explored the association between DNAm and daytime sleepiness quantified by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS).

Methods: We performed multi-ethnic and ethnic-specific epigenome-wide association studies for DNAm and ESS in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA; n = 619) and the Cardiovascular Health Study (n = 483), with cross-study replication and meta-analysis. Genetic variants near ESS-associated DNAm were analyzed for methylation quantitative trait loci and followed with replication of genotype-sleepiness associations in the UK Biobank.

Results: In MESA only, we detected four DNAm-ESS associations: one across all race/ethnic groups; three in African-Americans (AA) only. Two of the MESA AA associations, in genes KCTD5 and RXRA, nominally replicated in CHS (p-value < 0.05). In the AA meta-analysis, we detected 14 DNAm-ESS associations (FDR q-value < 0.05, top association p-value = 4.26 × 10-8). Three DNAm sites mapped to genes (CPLX3, GFAP, and C7orf50) with biological relevance. We also found evidence for associations with DNAm sites in RAI1, a gene associated with sleep and circadian phenotypes. UK Biobank follow-up analyses detected SNPs in RAI1, RXRA, and CPLX3 with nominal sleepiness associations.

Conclusions: We identified methylation sites in multiple genes possibly implicated in daytime sleepiness. Most significant DNAm-ESS associations were specific to AA. Future work is needed to identify mechanisms driving ancestry-specific methylation effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsz101DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6685317PMC
August 2019

Associations of variants In the hexokinase 1 and interleukin 18 receptor regions with oxyhemoglobin saturation during sleep.

PLoS Genet 2019 04 16;15(4):e1007739. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States of America.

Sleep disordered breathing (SDB)-related overnight hypoxemia is associated with cardiometabolic disease and other comorbidities. Understanding the genetic bases for variations in nocturnal hypoxemia may help understand mechanisms influencing oxygenation and SDB-related mortality. We conducted genome-wide association tests across 10 cohorts and 4 populations to identify genetic variants associated with three correlated measures of overnight oxyhemoglobin saturation: average and minimum oxyhemoglobin saturation during sleep and the percent of sleep with oxyhemoglobin saturation under 90%. The discovery sample consisted of 8,326 individuals. Variants with p < 1 × 10(-6) were analyzed in a replication group of 14,410 individuals. We identified 3 significantly associated regions, including 2 regions in multi-ethnic analyses (2q12, 10q22). SNPs in the 2q12 region associated with minimum SpO2 (rs78136548 p = 2.70 × 10(-10)). SNPs at 10q22 were associated with all three traits including average SpO2 (rs72805692 p = 4.58 × 10(-8)). SNPs in both regions were associated in over 20,000 individuals and are supported by prior associations or functional evidence. Four additional significant regions were detected in secondary sex-stratified and combined discovery and replication analyses, including a region overlapping Reelin, a known marker of respiratory complex neurons.These are the first genome-wide significant findings reported for oxyhemoglobin saturation during sleep, a phenotype of high clinical interest. Our replicated associations with HK1 and IL18R1 suggest that variants in inflammatory pathways, such as the biologically-plausible NLRP3 inflammasome, may contribute to nocturnal hypoxemia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1007739DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6467367PMC
April 2019

Multi-ancestry genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study of 387,272 individuals identifies new loci associated with serum lipids.

Nat Genet 2019 04 29;51(4):636-648. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.

The concentrations of high- and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides are influenced by smoking, but it is unknown whether genetic associations with lipids may be modified by smoking. We conducted a multi-ancestry genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study in 133,805 individuals with follow-up in an additional 253,467 individuals. Combined meta-analyses identified 13 new loci associated with lipids, some of which were detected only because association differed by smoking status. Additionally, we demonstrate the importance of including diverse populations, particularly in studies of interactions with lifestyle factors, where genomic and lifestyle differences by ancestry may contribute to novel findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-019-0378-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6467258PMC
April 2019

Genome-wide association study identifies genetic loci for self-reported habitual sleep duration supported by accelerometer-derived estimates.

Nat Commun 2019 03 7;10(1):1100. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Gastroenterology, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK.

Sleep is an essential state of decreased activity and alertness but molecular factors regulating sleep duration remain unknown. Through genome-wide association analysis in 446,118 adults of European ancestry from the UK Biobank, we identify 78 loci for self-reported habitual sleep duration (p < 5 × 10; 43 loci at p < 6 × 10). Replication is observed for PAX8, VRK2, and FBXL12/UBL5/PIN1 loci in the CHARGE study (n = 47,180; p < 6.3 × 10), and 55 signals show sign-concordant effects. The 78 loci further associate with accelerometer-derived sleep duration, daytime inactivity, sleep efficiency and number of sleep bouts in secondary analysis (n = 85,499). Loci are enriched for pathways including striatum and subpallium development, mechanosensory response, dopamine binding, synaptic neurotransmission and plasticity, among others. Genetic correlation indicates shared links with anthropometric, cognitive, metabolic, and psychiatric traits and two-sample Mendelian randomization highlights a bidirectional causal link with schizophrenia. This work provides insights into the genetic basis for inter-individual variation in sleep duration implicating multiple biological pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-08917-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6405943PMC
March 2019

Biological and clinical insights from genetics of insomnia symptoms.

Nat Genet 2019 03 25;51(3):387-393. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

K.G. Jebsen Centre for Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

Insomnia is a common disorder linked with adverse long-term medical and psychiatric outcomes. The underlying pathophysiological processes and causal relationships of insomnia with disease are poorly understood. Here we identified 57 loci for self-reported insomnia symptoms in the UK Biobank (n = 453,379) and confirmed their effects on self-reported insomnia symptoms in the HUNT Study (n = 14,923 cases and 47,610 controls), physician-diagnosed insomnia in the Partners Biobank (n = 2,217 cases and 14,240 controls), and accelerometer-derived measures of sleep efficiency and sleep duration in the UK Biobank (n = 83,726). Our results suggest enrichment of genes involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and of genes expressed in multiple brain regions, skeletal muscle, and adrenal glands. Evidence of shared genetic factors was found between frequent insomnia symptoms and restless legs syndrome, aging, and cardiometabolic, behavioral, psychiatric, and reproductive traits. Evidence was found for a possible causal link between insomnia symptoms and coronary artery disease, depressive symptoms, and subjective well-being.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-019-0361-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6415688PMC
March 2019

Brief (<4 hr) sleep episodes are insufficient for restoring performance in first-year resident physicians working overnight extended-duration work shifts.

Sleep 2019 05;42(5)

Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.

Study Objectives: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) recently reinstated extended-duration (24-28 hr) work shifts (EDWS) for postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) resident physicians. This study examined the relationship between overnight sleep duration during EDWS and subsequent "post-call" performance in PGY-1 resident physicians.

Methods: Thirty-four PGY-1 resident physicians (23 males; 24-32 years) were studied between 2002 and 2004 during 3-week Q3 "on-call" rotation schedules in the Medical and Cardiac Intensive Care Units at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Daily sleep logs (validated by ambulatory polysomnography) were collected and the 10 min psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) was administered every ~6 hr during each EDWS. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the relationship between overnight sleep duration and PVT performance "post-call" (0500-1900 hr). Postcall performance during EDWS was compared with sessions matched for time-of-day and weeks-into-schedule in the same resident physician during an intervention schedule that eliminated EDWS.

Results: Resident physicians obtained an average of 1.6 ± 1.5 hr cumulative sleep overnight during EDWS (<4 hr on 92% of nights). PVT attentional failures were significantly reduced only after >4 hr sleep (p = 0.027 versus no sleep). Despite this apparent improvement, the odds of incurring >1 attentional failure were 2.72 times higher during postcall following >4 hr sleep compared with matched sessions during non-EDWS.

Conclusions: Even with >4 hr sleep overnight (8% of EDWS), performance remained significantly impaired. These findings suggest that even "strategic napping," a recommendation recently removed from ACGME guidelines, is insufficient to mitigate severe performance impairment introduced by extending duty beyond 16 hr.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsz041DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6519906PMC
May 2019
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