Publications by authors named "Barbara Aaron"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

COVID-19: A Barometer for Social Justice in New York City.

Am J Public Health 2020 11 10;110(11):1656-1658. Epub 2020 Sep 10.

Ayman El-Mohandes is the Dean of the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy and with the Department of Epidemiology, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, New York, NY. Barbara Aaron is with the Department of Communications, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. Scott C. Ratzan, Lauren Rauh, Victoria Ngo, Kenneth Rabin, and Nicholas Freudenberg are with the Department of Community Health and Social Sciences, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. Spencer Kimball is with the Department of Communication Studies, Emerson College, Boston, MA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305939DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7542288PMC
November 2020

Substantial Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness in Households With Children During the 2013-2014 Influenza Season, When 2009 Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1) Virus Predominated.

J Infect Dis 2016 Apr 23;213(8):1229-36. Epub 2015 Nov 23.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor.

Background: We examined the influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) during the 2013-2014 influenza season, in which 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus (influenza A[H1N1]pdm09) predominated. In 2 previous years when influenza A(H3N2) virus predominated, the VE was low and negatively affected by prior year vaccination.

Methods: We enrolled and followed 232 households with 1049 members, including 618 children; specimens were collected from subjects with acute respiratory illnesses. The VE in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection was estimated in adjusted models. Preseason hemagglutination-inhibition and neuraminidase-inhibition antibody titers were determined to assess susceptibility.

Results: Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was identified in 25 households (10.8%) and 47 individuals (4.5%). Adjusted VE against infection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was 66% (95% confidence interval [CI], 23%-85%), with similar point estimates in children and adults, and against both community-acquired and household-acquired infections. VE did not appear to be different for live-attenuated and inactivated vaccines among children aged 2-8 years, although numbers were small. VE was similar for subjects vaccinated in both current and prior seasons and for those vaccinated in the current season only; susceptibility titers were consistent with this observation.

Conclusions: Findings, including substantial significant VE and a lack of a negative effect of repeated vaccination on VE, were in contrast to those seen in prior seasons in which influenza A(H3N2) virus predominated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiv563DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4799665PMC
April 2016

Combating the terror of terrorism.

Sci Am 2002 Aug;287(2):70-7

Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/scientificamerican0802-70DOI Listing
August 2002
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