Publications by authors named "Asbjørn Jokstad"

78 Publications

Quantification of porosity in composite resins delivered by injectable syringes using X-ray microtomography.

Biomater Investig Dent 2020 Jul 6;7(1):86-95. Epub 2020 Jul 6.

Department of Clinical Dentistry, UiT - The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.

Objective: To assess whether composite polymer resin delivered in compules include pores and the possible effect on the amount of porosity in dental restorations.

Method And Materials: Original compules containing unpolymerised composite polymer resin (CPR) were scanned in a micro-CT. Four products were examined, which comprised universal composites (Herculite XRV Ultra, Ceram.X Universal, Tetric Evo Ceram) and a flowable bulk-fill composite (SDR) ( = 10 per group). The pore size distribution and amount of porosity (vol.%) were estimated for the unpolymerized and polymerized material used to restore a standardised cavity in a typodont tooth. Manufacturers' instructions were followed regarding material handling, and polymerisation by use of a calibrated light-curing unit. The pore characteristics and their size distribution, and the amount of porosity in the dental restoration were contrasted with the values measured in the compule. Non-parametric tests were used to analyse differences between the four products.

Results: All the composite polymer resin compules contained unpolymerised material that included pores. The universal composite compules included pores predominantly in the sub-100 µm sizes. In contrast, the flowable bulk-fill compules included a few pores with a diameter >100 µm, which were assumed to be air-bubbles. The unpolymerised material within the compule included consistently more pores compared to the extruded portion from the compule tip, and in the final restoration ( < .001). The amount of porosity in the restorations differed amongst the tested materials, with the flowable bulk-fill composite showing the lowest amount of porosity ( < .01).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/26415275.2020.1784013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7782768PMC
July 2020

Piezoelectric bone surgery compared with conventional rotary instruments in oral surgery and implantology: Summary and consensus statements of the International Piezoelectric Surgery Academy Consensus Conference 2019.

Int J Oral Implantol (Berl) 2020 ;13(3):235-239

Purpose: Piezoelectric bone surgery was introduced into clinical practice almost 20 years ago as an alternative method for cutting bone in dental surgical procedures, in an attempt to reduce the disadvantages of using conventional rotary instruments. The aim of this Consensus Conference was to evaluate the current evidence concerning the use of piezoelectric surgery in oral surgery and implantology.

Materials And Methods: Three working groups conducted three meta-analyses with trial sequential analysis, focusing on the use of piezoelectric surgery in impacted mandibular third molar extraction, lateral sinus floor elevation and implant site preparation. The method of preparation of the systematic reviews, based on comprehensive search strategies and following preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, was discussed and standardised.

Results: Moderate/low evidence suggests that piezoelectric surgery is significantly associated with a more favourable postoperative course (less pain, less trismus) after impacted mandibular third molar extraction than conventional rotary instruments. Moderate evidence suggests that implants inserted with piezoelectric surgery showed improved secondary stability during the early phases of healing compared with those inserted using a drilling technique. Strong/moderate evidence suggests that piezoelectric surgery prolongs the duration of surgery in impacted mandibular third molar extraction, sinus floor elevation and implant site preparation, but it is unclear whether the slight differences in duration of surgery, even if statistically significant, represent a real clinical advantage for either operator or patient. Weak evidence or insufficient data are present to draw definitive conclusions on the other investigated outcomes.

Conclusions: Further well-designed trials are needed to fully evaluate the effects of piezoelectric surgery, especially in implant site preparation and sinus floor elevation.
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September 2020

Piezoelectric bone surgery for implant site preparation compared with conventional drilling techniques: A systematic review, meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis.

Int J Oral Implantol (Berl) 2020 ;13(2):141-158

Purpose: To evaluate whether the use of piezoelectric bone surgery (PBS) for implant site preparation reduces surgical time, improves implant stability, preserves marginal bone level and improves the survival rate of oral implants compared with conventional drilling techniques.

Materials And Methods: This meta-analysis followed the PRISMA (preferred reporting items for systematic review and meta-analysis) guidelines and was registered in the PROSPERO (international prospective register of systematic reviews) database (CRD42019142749). The PubMed, Embase, Scopus and Open Grey databases were screened for articles published from 1 January 1990 to 31 December 2018. The selection criteria included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and case-control studies (CCTs) comparing the PBS with conventional rotary instruments for implant site preparation, and reporting any of the selected clinical outcomes (surgical time, implant stability, marginal bone variations and implant failure rate) for both groups. The risk of bias assessment was performed using the Cochrane Collaboration tool for RCTs and the Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS) for CCTs. A meta-analysis was performed, and the power of the meta-analytic findings was assessed by trial sequential analysis (TSA).

Results: Eight RCTs and one CCT met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. The meta-analysis and the TSA showed moderate evidence suggesting that the PBS prolongs surgery duration and improves secondary stability 12 weeks after implant placement compared with conventional drilling techniques. Insufficient data are available in literature to assess if the PBS reduces marginal bone loss and/or improves the implant survival rate compared with conventional drilling techniques.

Conclusions: Adequately powered randomised clinical trials are needed to confirm the PBS positive effect on the secondary stability and to draw conclusions about the influence of PBS on marginal bone stability and implant survival.
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May 2020

Dog-assisted therapy in the dental clinic. Part B. Hazards and assessment of potential risks to the health and safety of the dental therapy dog.

Clin Exp Dent Res 2019 12 20;5(6):701-711. Epub 2019 Aug 20.

Faculty of Health Sciences UiT The Arctic University of Norway Tromsø Norway.

Background: A dental therapy dog may help anxious patients in the dental clinic overcome their fear and facilitate the completion of necessary dental care. Dental clinic activities are associated with hazards that may pose potential risks to the health and safety of the dental therapy dog.

Objectives: To describe potential hazards associated with risks to health and safety to therapy dogs in dental clinics and to present suggestions for risk minimisation by adopting best practices in dental clinic settings.

Materials And Method: Literature searches in Medline, http://Clinicaltrials.gov, and Google Scholar for qualitative and quantitative assessments of occupational hazards and risks in dental clinics, in combination with a review of the reference list of the included studies. Identified hazards and risks were analysed relative to their relevance for the health and welfare of a therapy dog present in a dental clinic setting.

Results: Workplace hazards in the dental clinic that apply to both humans and therapy dogs are allergies, sharps injury, eye injury, stress, rhinitis, hearing impairment, and other hazards. Additional concerns associated with risks for the dental therapy dog are situations involving erratic patient behaviour and threats if the patient is an undisclosed disease carrier. Risks to the health and safety of the dental therapy dog in the clinics are present but are low if the dental clinical staff and dog handlers comply with best practices.

Conclusions: Best practice includes awareness amongst the clinic staff and the dog handler of all potential hazards in the dental clinic and on how to reduce these hazards as well as adverse events that may scare the dental therapy dog. The dental therapy dog team must be specially trained to work in a dental clinic. Each treatment session has to be exclusively tailored to that specific appointment and the individual patient.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cre2.239DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6934346PMC
December 2019

Dog-assisted therapy in the dental clinic: Part A-Hazards and assessment of potential risks to the health and safety of humans.

Clin Exp Dent Res 2019 12 16;5(6):692-700. Epub 2019 Aug 16.

Faculty of Health Sciences UiT The Arctic University of Norway Tromsø Norway.

Background: Dog-assisted therapy in the dental clinic may be an attractive alternative to sedation for anxious patients. Including a dental therapy dog in a clinical setting introduces new hazards and potential risks to health and safety for both humans and animal.

Objectives: The study aims to describe potential hazards associated with risks to humans by having a therapy dog present in the dental clinic and to provide guidance on best practices to minimise and control risks for the patients, the dentist, and the dental clinic staff.

Materials And Methods: Literature searches in Medline, http://Clinicaltrials.gov, and Google Scholar for qualitative and quantitative assessments of hazards and risks associated with the use of therapy dogs in health care settings, in combination with a review of the reference list of the included studies. Identified hazards and risks were analysed with respect for the health and welfare of humans in a dental clinic setting that involves the presence of a therapy dog.

Results: Potential risks to health and safety for humans in dental clinics that offer dog-assisted therapy can be categorised within four general categories of hazards: the dog as a source of zoonotic pathogens and human diseases, exposure to canine allergens, adverse animal behaviour, and dangers associated with high activity in a congested dental clinic operatory. Risks to humans are reduced by maintaining awareness amongst the dental clinic staff and the dog handler of all potential hazards in the dental clinic, and on how to reduce these hazards as well as adverse events that may scare the dental therapy dog.

Conclusions: Risks to the health and safety of humans in the presence of therapy dog in the clinics are present but are low if the dental clinical staff and dog handlers comply with best practices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cre2.240DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6934338PMC
December 2019

Please do not feel bad, identifying the precise study design used in clinical research may be a challenge.

Authors:
Asbjørn Jokstad

Clin Exp Dent Res 2019 06 20;5(3):181-183. Epub 2019 Jun 20.

Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway Tromsø Norway.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cre2.211DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6585578PMC
June 2019

Who can claim the ownership to the blueprints of my body parts?

Authors:
Asbjørn Jokstad

Clin Exp Dent Res 2019 04 25;5(2):107-108. Epub 2019 Apr 25.

Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway Tromsø Norway.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cre2.187DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6483036PMC
April 2019

Quo Vadis, Cochrane Collaboration?

Authors:
Asbjorn Jokstad

Clin Exp Dent Res 2019 02 27;5(1):3-6. Epub 2019 Feb 27.

Department of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Health of Health Sciences UiT The Arctic University of Norway.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cre2.176DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6392814PMC
February 2019

Systematic review of clinical and patient-reported outcomes following oral rehabilitation on dental implants with a tapered compared to a non-tapered implant design.

Clin Oral Implants Res 2018 Oct;29 Suppl 16:41-54

South Florida Center for Periodontics & Implant Dentistry, Boca Raton, FL, USA.

Background: Dental implants are available in different shapes.

Aims: This systematic review aims to address whether tapered compared to non-tapered implants demonstrate similar clinical and patient-reported outcomes. The review follows the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) format.

Materials & Methods: We searched electronic databases including MEDLINE through PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomized clinical trials (RCT) that compare tapered versus non-tapered implants with at least 10 treated participants and a minimum mean follow-up time of 3 years. There were no restrictions to a particular treatment indication or outcome measures. Two authors independently conducted screening, risk of bias assessment, and data extraction of eligible trials in duplicate. We applied the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool to consider risk of bias.

Results: We identified 18 different RCTs, of which three reported outcomes at 3 years or greater. The three trials described the results of 245 participants with 388 implants at 3 years, from the initially 306 participants with 494 implants at baseline. The three trials compared, respectively, two, two, and three different commercially available implant brands and reported only clinically insignificant differences. We judged all three trials to be at moderate risk of bias. The low number and heterogeneity of RCTs did not allow for meta-analyses.

Discussion And Conclusion: Appropriate professional judgment in clinical decision making must include a comprehensive diagnosis of the patient's jawbone quality and quantity and consideration of osteotomy protocol in accordance with the patient's treatment preferences, where the shape of the dental implant is only one contributory factor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/clr.13128DOI Listing
October 2018

Group 1 ITI Consensus Report: The influence of implant length and design and medications on clinical and patient-reported outcomes.

Clin Oral Implants Res 2018 Oct;29 Suppl 16:69-77

Department of Periodontology, Semmelweis Egyetem, Budapest, Hungary.

Objectives: The aim of Working Group 1 was to address the influence of different local (implant length, diameter, and design) and systemic (medications) factors on clinical, radiographic, and patient-reported outcomes in implant dentistry. Focused questions on (a) short posterior dental implants (≤6 mm), (b) narrow diameter implants, (c) implant design (tapered compared to a non-tapered implant design), and (d) medication-related dental implant failures were addressed.

Materials And Methods: Four systematic reviews were prepared in advance of the Consensus Conference and were discussed among the participants of Group 1. Consensus statements, clinical recommendations, and recommendations for future research were based on structured group discussions until consensus was reached among the entire expert Group 1. The statements were then presented and accepted following further discussion and modifications as required by the plenary.

Results: Short implants (≤6 mm) revealed a survival rate ranging from 86.7% to 100%, whereas standard implant survival rate ranged from 95% to 100% with a follow-up from 1 to 5 years. Short implants demonstrated a higher variability and a higher Risk Ratio [RR: 1.24 (95% CI: 0.63, 2.44, p = 0.54)] for failure compared to standard implants. Narrow diameter implants (NDI) have been classified into three categories: Category 1: Implants with a diameter of <2.5 mm ("Mini-implants"); Category 2: Implants with a diameter of 2.5 mm to <3.3 mm; Category 3: Implants with a diameter of 3.3 mm to 3.5 mm. Mean survival rates were 94.7 ± 5%, 97.3 ± 5% and 97.7 ± 2.3% for category 1, 2 and 3. Tapered versus non-tapered implants demonstrated only insignificant differences regarding clinical, radiographic, and patient-reported outcomes. The intake of certain selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and proton pump inhibitors is associated with a statistically significant increased implant failure rate. The intake of bisphosphonates related to the treatment of osteoporosis was not associated with an increased implant failure rate.

Conclusions: It is concluded that short implants (≤6 mm) are a valid option in situations of reduced bone height to avoid possible morbidity associated with augmentation procedures; however, they reveal a higher variability and lower predictability in survival rates. Narrow diameter implants with diameters of 2.5 mm and more demonstrated no difference in implant survival rates compared to standard diameter implants. In contrast, it is concluded that narrow diameter implants with diameters of less than 2.5 mm exhibited lower survival rates compared to standard diameter implants. It is further concluded that there are no differences between tapered versus non-tapered dental implants. Certain medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and proton pump inhibitors showed an association with a higher implant failure rate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/clr.13342DOI Listing
October 2018

Quality dentistry and ethical dental practice.

Authors:
Asbjorn Jokstad

Clin Exp Dent Res 2018 Aug 30;4(4):103-104. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cre2.128DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6115878PMC
August 2018

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) versus patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs)-Is there a difference?

Authors:
Asbjørn Jokstad

Clin Exp Dent Res 2018 Jun 19;4(3):61-62. Epub 2018 Jun 19.

Institute of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Health Sciences UiT The Arctic University of Norway Norway.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cre2.112DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6010775PMC
June 2018

Investigational Clinical Trial of a Prototype Optoelectronic Computer-Aided Navigation Device for Dental Implant Surgery.

Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 2018 May/Jun;33(3):679-692

Purpose: New digital technologies enable real-time computer-aided (CA) three-dimensional (3D) guidance during dental implant surgery. The aim of this investigational clinical trial was to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of a prototype optoelectronic CA-navigation device in comparison with the conventional approach for planning and effecting dental implant surgery.

Materials And Methods: Study participants with up to four missing teeth were recruited from the pool of patients referred to the University of Toronto Graduate Prosthodontics clinic. The first 10 participants were allocated to either a conventional or a prototype device study arm in a randomized trial. The next 10 participants received implants using the prototype device. All study participants were restored with fixed dental prostheses after 3 (mandible) or 6 (maxilla) months healing, and monitored over 12 months. The primary outcome was the incidence of any surgical, biologic, or prosthetic adverse events or device-related complications. Secondary outcomes were the incidence of positioning of implants not considered suitable for straightforward prosthetic restoration (yes/no); the perception of the ease of use of the prototype device by the two oral surgeons, recorded by use of a Likert-type questionnaire; and the clinical performance of the implant and superstructure after 1 year in function. Positioning of the implants was appraised on periapical radiographs and clinical photographs by four independent blinded examiners. Peri-implant bone loss was measured on periapical radiographs by a blinded examiner.

Results: No adverse events occurred related to placing any implants. Four device-related complications led to a switch from using the prototype device to the conventional method. All implants placed by use of the prototype device were in a position considered suitable for straightforward prosthetic restoration (n = 21). The qualitative evaluation by the surgeons was generally positive, although ergonomic challenges were identified. All study participants were present for the 1-year examination (n = 20 patients, 41 implants, 32 superstructures), and no complications or failures with any implants or superstructures were revealed. The peri-implant bone loss was less than 1 mm for all implants.

Conclusion: Within the limitations of this trial, the prototype device provided placement of dental implants without adverse events.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11607/jomi.6351DOI Listing
August 2018

The art of amusing the public while conducting research may be fruitful.

Authors:
Asbjorn Jokstad

Clin Exp Dent Res 2018 Apr 10;4(2):37-39. Epub 2018 Apr 10.

Institute of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Health Sciences UiT The Arctic University of Norway Norway.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cre2.105DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5893471PMC
April 2018

Medline indexing of the latest research findings in dental research has stopped.

Authors:
Asbjorn Jokstad

Clin Exp Dent Res 2018 Feb 15;4(1):3-5. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

Institute of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Health Sciences UiT The Arctic University of Norway Norway.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cre2.103DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5813891PMC
February 2018

Register-based observational studies - who will endorse that maternal smoking lowers the odds for developing hay fever and eczema?

Authors:
Asbjørn Jokstad

Clin Exp Dent Res 2017 Dec 22;3(6):207-208. Epub 2017 Dec 22.

Department of Clinical Dentistry, UiT The Arctic University of Norway Norway.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cre2.99DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5839177PMC
December 2017

Cochrane Collaboration Systematic Reviews may be based on trials not approved by a research ethics committee.

Authors:
Asbjørn Jokstad

Clin Exp Dent Res 2017 Oct 27;3(5):179-182. Epub 2017 Oct 27.

Department of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Health Sciences UiT The Arctic University of Norway Norway.

Systematic reviews (SR) may potentially contain reports of primary trials with ethical problems. The Cochrane Collaboration SRs are considered as the highest standard in evidence-based health care resources. All SRs completed during the last 5 years (2013-2017) under the management of the Oral Health Group of the Cochrane Collaboration were identified. All primary trials included in the Oral Health Group SRs were identified and examined to establish their status regarding pre-hoc approval of an independent ethics committee (EC), often termed Institutional Review Board (IRB) before commencing recruitment of trial participants. Ninety-five SRs contained 960 primary trials, of which 272 (28.3%) were not examined by the author of this paper. Amongst the remaining 688 primary trials, 198 (29%) contained no reference to study conduct approval by a research ethics committee. The majority of primary studies referred to an EC/IRB approval with or without identifying the name of the ethics committee (n = 401, 58%), whereas some papers identified both the committee name and a protocol or reference number of the EC/IRB approval (n = 89, 13%). The Cochrane Collaboration, along with other developers of SRs, should adopt the policy established by COPE with regard to what to do if one suspect an ethical problem, that is, request evidence of EC/IRB approval. All stakeholders should rest assured that clinical policies and practices based on SRs are based on ethically sound clinical research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cre2.79DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5839214PMC
October 2017

The approval of clinical research by an independent ethics committee - a compulsory requirement and not a matter of the investigator's choosing.

Authors:
Asbjørn Jokstad

Clin Exp Dent Res 2017 Oct 27;3(5):163-164. Epub 2017 Oct 27.

Department of Clinical Dentistry, UiT The Arctic University of Norway Norway.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cre2.92DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5839245PMC
October 2017

The disorder of disorders in current nosology.

Authors:
Asbjørn Jokstad

Clin Exp Dent Res 2017 Aug 29;3(4):123-125. Epub 2017 Aug 29.

Department of Clinical Dentistry UiT, The Arctic University of Norway Norway.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cre2.77DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5839202PMC
August 2017

Accuracy of digital appliances for use in dentistry for dummies.

Authors:
Asbjørn Jokstad

Clin Exp Dent Res 2017 Apr 27;3(2):43-44. Epub 2017 Apr 27.

CEDR UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cre2.66DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5719816PMC
April 2017

Benchmarking Outcomes in Implant Prosthodontics: Partial Fixed Dental Prostheses and Crowns Supported by Implants with a Turned Surface over 10 to 28 Years at the University of Toronto.

Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 2017 July/August;32(4):880–892. Epub 2017 Mar 23.

Purpose: The aim of this noninterventional, retrospective study was to benchmark the outcomes of patients with partial fixed prostheses supported by implants treated at the University of Toronto at least 10 years earlier. A study protocol for assessing outcomes on like patients developed at the University of Bern, Switzerland, was followed.

Materials And Methods: All patients who had received at least one implant before 2002 were considered eligible to be included in the study (n = 298). The treatment histories were recorded from the patient chart of the participants, or from the participants' dentists by consent. Calibrated clinicians examined the study participants clinically and radiologically and recorded peri-implant mucosal status and observable technical and mechanical failures. Past adverse events were identified in the patient charts. Independent assessors measured bone levels on digitized radiographs. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics at implants, teeth, and study participant levels, respectively.

Results: Of the 298 eligible patients, 121 attended a clinical examination (41%), while 12 declined (4%). The 121 study participants had received 321 implants between 1983 and 2001. The implants showed a success rate of 88.9% and a survival rate of 94% after an average of 17.5 years (SD 5.2, range 10 to 28 years). Approximately 5% of the surviving implants showed signs, or were associated with a prior history, of peri-implantitis. The distance from the implant shoulder to the first bone contact varied from -3 mm to 7 mm (mean = 1.52 mm [SD 1.57], median = 2.2 mm). Approximately half of the study participants had experienced at least one defect of their superstructure, representing a 52% "success rate," while the survival rate was 70%. The majority were very satisfied or satisfied with the treatment (102/121).

Conclusion: A high proportion (94%) of conventional machined Brånemark System implants placed between 1983 and 2001 remained in function after an average of 17.5 years. The original superstructures predominantly fabricated as prefabricated acrylic teeth and acrylic resin reinforced with a cast palladium-silver alloy core were still in place for 70% of the participants, and 48% of the superstructures had never undergone any form of repairs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11607/jomi.5454DOI Listing
March 2017

Dentists and new digital appliances - to buy or delay until the next model?

Authors:
Asbjorn Jokstad

Clin Exp Dent Res 2016 Dec 28;2(3):177-178. Epub 2016 Dec 28.

Institute of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Health of Health Sciences UiT, The Arctic University of Norway Norway.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cre2.56DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5839209PMC
December 2016

The young scientist's guide to win the award for best presentation.

Authors:
Asbjorn Jokstad

Clin Exp Dent Res 2016 Nov 29;2(2):83-84. Epub 2016 Nov 29.

Institute of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Health of Health Sciences UiT, The Arctic University of Norway Norway.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cre2.47DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5839208PMC
November 2016