Publications by authors named "Arthur Aanesen"

9 Publications

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The role of social media for persons affected by infertility.

BMC Womens Health 2020 05 24;20(1):112. Epub 2020 May 24.

Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Infertility remains a common universal disorder and a whole range of assisted reproductive technologies has been established. Society may fail to recognize the grief caused by infertility, which may lead to those struggling with it hiding their feelings. Previous research points out that infertile persons experience shortcomings in fertility care regarding continuity of care and social support. Social media may provide social and psychological support for infertile persons. Finding others who are going through similar experiences can help in the realization that the person is not alone and that her/his feelings are reasonable. The aim was to explore the roles of social media for persons affected by infertility.

Methods: A cross-sectional, computer-assisted, self-administered online questionnaire, containing both open and closed questions, was used to collect data. The questionnaire was linked to the bulletin board of six closed infertility social forums. Both quantitative and qualitative analysis methods were used. A total of 132 participants completed the questionnaire containing questions about their use of social media dealing with infertility.

Results: Most of the questionnaires were answered by females (97.7%) through Facebook (87%). Over 60% of the respondents had taken part in discussions about infertility in social media, between one and three years and 39% participated more than once a day. Half of the participants devoted one to three hours weekly to the forums and wrote 1-5 postings per week. The forums offered participants information, solidarity, and the opportunity to receive and give support. However, an adverse aspect that was described concerned advice that were not evidence-based. Infertility was experienced as being alienated from social life and being fragmented as a person.

Conclusion: Participating in infertility forums offers persons information about fertility treatments and social support in the process of coping with infertility.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12905-020-00964-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7245829PMC
May 2020

Infertility-related communication and coping strategies among women affected by primary or secondary infertility.

J Clin Nurs 2018 Jan 30;27(1-2):e335-e344. Epub 2017 Aug 30.

Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm, Sweden.

Aim And Objectives: To explore infertility-related communication and coping strategies among women affected by primary or secondary fertility problems.

Background: Infertility is a worldwide problem and is experienced as psychologically stressful. Communication about infertility varies depending on clinical aspects, personal relationships and culture.

Methods: A quantitative cross-sectional study design was used. One hundred and ninety-nine women affected by primary and secondary infertility were recruited from one fertility clinic in Stockholm. A structured self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. The answers were compared across the two groups using the chi-squared test for independence.

Results: The majority of the women discussed infertility-related subjects with intimate friends and/or relatives and did not discuss the results of examinations and tests with people outside of the family. There were significant differences between the two groups. Twice as many women with secondary infertility acknowledged that they never talk about the causes or results of the tests and examinations with other people, compared with women with primary infertility. Approximately 25% of the women with primary infertility used distraction techniques, such as turning to work, as a coping strategy compared to women with secondary infertility (10%). Some women did not discuss the inability to conceive and reasons why they were childless with their spouses. Twelve percentage of the women reported that they left the room when the subjects of children were being discussed. Approximately 30% of the participants did not ask friends or relatives for advice and a few were not able to discuss how tests and treatments affected them emotionally.

Conclusion: This study indicates that a majority of infertile women discuss about infertility-related subjects with their spouses. However, they are less likely to discuss the reason for infertility and results of tests and examinations with people outside the family.

Relevance To The Clinical Practice: The result of the current study can be useful regarding interventions for women affected by primary or by secondary infertility. The healthcare staff must be alert and attentive to pay attention to these possible challenges. Identification of women at risk of developing emotional problems due to communication difficulties regarding infertility-related issues merits close attention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocn.13953DOI Listing
January 2018

Prospective study of a Swedish infertile cohort 2005-08: population characteristics, treatments and pregnancy rates.

Fam Pract 2014 Jun 3;31(3):290-7. Epub 2014 Mar 3.

Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: We here report on results from a prospective study comprising 380 infertile couples undergoing infertility work-up and various treatments for infertility in our clinic. The aim was to investigate the overall birth rate as a result of different treatments, as well as spontaneous pregnancies.

Methods: Three hundred and eighty couples were consecutively included between December 2005 and May 2008. All couples underwent a fertility work-up, including hysterosalpingogram, hormonal characterization, clinical examination, screening for infectious diseases and semen analysis. The mean age of the women at the time of inclusion was 33.2 years. The mean duration of infertility prior to inclusion was 1.8 years. And 46.6% (n = 177) of the women had been pregnant prior to their first visit to the clinic and 30.0% (n = 114) had been pregnant earlier in their present relationship.

Results: As of November 2010, 57.3% (n = 218) of the women had given birth to a child when they were lost to follow up by the study. Spontaneous conception was observed in 11.3% (n = 43) of the women, 14.5% (n = 64) conceived after intrauterine insemination (IUI), 4.2% (n = 16) conceived after ovarian hyperstimulation and ovulation induction (OH/OI) and 28.4% (n = 113) after in vitro fertilization. There were 280 pregnancies and 58 spontaneous abortions (22.3%) in the group. Mean anti-mullerian hormone significantly correlated with antral follicle count and age and was significantly higher in the subgroup that became pregnant after IUI.

Conclusions: Spontaneous pregnancies and IUI + OH/OI contributed significantly to the pregnancies observed in the total population. Predictive factors for pregnancy were anti-mullerian hormone in the group undergoing IUI treatment and in the age group ≥38-duration of infertility. Previous pregnancies, body mass index, estradiol, follicle stimulating hormone or having given birth prior to the infertility period were not predictive of pregnancy for the infertile couples in this study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/fampra/cmu003DOI Listing
June 2014

Modified natural cycle IVF and mild IVF: a 10 year Swedish experience.

Reprod Biomed Online 2010 Jan 31;20(1):156-62. Epub 2009 Oct 31.

IVF Unit, Queen Sophia Hospital, Box 5605, 114 86 Stockholm, Sweden.

Modified natural cycle IVF (mnc-IVF) or mild IVF (m-IVF) was offered to selected patients between 1996 and 2007; 43 patients during 129 cycles were treated with mnc-IVF and 145 couples during 250 cycles were treated with m-IVF. Comparison with outcome from conventional IVF cycles during the same time period and in the same clinic was performed. Although 53.5 and 39.6% of started cycles respectively never reached embryo transfer, the ongoing pregnancy rates per embryo transfer were 26.7% for mnc-IVF and 27.2% for m-IVF. During the same time period, cancellation rate for conventional IVF was 13.7% and the ongoing pregnancy rate per embryo transfer was 34.3%. For patients > or =38years of age, the ongoing pregnancy rate per embryo transfer was 17.5% in the m-IVF group. None of the patients aged > or =38years in the mnc-IVF group achieved an ongoing pregnancy. For patients treated with conventional IVF, the > or =38years of age pregnancy rate per embryo transfer was 27.0%. Costs of medication for m-IVF and mnc-IVF were 96.3 and 97.5% less than for the least expensive conventional IVF cycle respectively. Pregnancy rates per embryo transfer are acceptable for these treatment modalities, the cost for medication is low, risks for complications are dramatically reduced, and the treatments may be more psychologically acceptable to the patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rbmo.2009.10.017DOI Listing
January 2010

[Y chromosome--a sensitive resource or an evolutionary dead end?].

Lakartidningen 2006 Nov 29-Dec 5;103(48):3829-31

Kvinnokliniken, Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset Solna.

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January 2007

Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor polymorphisms in a population of infertile women.

Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 2005 Aug;84(8):806-11

Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Women and Child Health, Karolinska Institute Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: There are two known polymorphisms of clinical relevance in the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor exon 10, alanine or threonine at position 307, and asparagine or serine at position 680, giving rise to two discrete allelic variants: Thr307/Asn680 and Ala307/Ser680. At position 680, three FSH receptor variants are possible: Asn/Asn, Asn/Ser, and Ser/Ser. We hypothesized an association between FSH receptor polymorphisms and ovarian reserve.

Methods: FSH receptor polymorphisms at position 680 were studied in a population of 68 infertile women. We used serum FSH level at cycle day 3 as a screening for ovarian reserve. DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes in whole blood by using PCR and DNA sequencing in order to determine the type of FSH receptor.

Results: The distribution of FSH receptor variants was Asn/Asn (AA) 35%, Asn/Ser (AS) 24%, and Ser/Ser (SS) 41%. In women with normal ovarian reserve, FSH levels at cycle day 3 were 5.6 +/- 1.9 (AA group), 6.7 +/- 1.3 (AS group), and 5.7 +/- 1.7 (SS group) (non-significant). Corresponding FSH levels at cycle day 10 were 6.9 +/- 1.9, 6.3 +/- 1.7, and 8.3 +/- 2.8 (P < 0.01, AA and AS vs. SS group). In the SS group, FSH levels at cycle day 10 were significantly higher than they were at cycle day 3 (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: The results show that Ser/Ser-680 predominates in the studied infertile population. Furthermore, women with normal ovarian reserve and the Ser/Ser FSH receptor variant had significantly higher FSH levels, compared to women with Asn/Asn and Asn/Ser variants. FSH receptor genotyping may, thus, be interesting as an adjunct indicator of ovarian reserve for infertile women undergoing assisted reproduction, and may be helpful in the determination of the starting dosage of FSH in in vitro fertilization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.0001-6349.2005.00736.xDOI Listing
August 2005

Inhibin B predicts oocyte number and the ratio IGF-I/IGFBP-1 may indicate oocyte quality during ovarian hyperstimulation for in vitro fertilization.

J Assist Reprod Genet 2003 May;20(5):167-76

Reproductive Medical Center, Department of Women and Child Health, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.

Purpose: To perform a retrospective analysis of 62 age-matched IVF-treated women in order to investigate whether levels of inhibin B, IGF-I, and IGFBP-1 in serum 2 days before oocyte retrieval and in follicular fluid at the day of oocyte retrieval might be useful as indicators of the ovarian ability to produce oocytes (ovarian reserve).

Methods: Patients were allocated into three groups on the basis of the number of oocytes retrieved. Group 1 ("low responders") had 0-3 oocytes, group 2 ("normal responders") had 6-11 oocytes, and group 3 ("high responders") had 12 oocytes or more. Levels of inhibin B, IGF-I, and IGFBP-1 in follicular fluid and in serum obtained 2 days before oocyte retrieval were analyzed and correlated to clinical parameters including estradiol levels, progesterone levels, follicle size, follicle number, and oocyte number.

Results: We found significant differences in inhibin B levels in the three groups. Inhibin B levels in follicular fluid and serum was strongly correlated to the number of oocytes retrieved (p < 0.01). The number of oocytes retrieved were also correlated to total FSH dose (p < 0.05), to estradiol 2 days before and at ovum pick-up (p < 0.05), to progesterone at ovum pick-up (p < 0.0001), to progesterone at embryo transfer (p < 0.05), and to the number of follicles (size 12-15 mm, p < 0.001, size > 15 mm, p < 0.01). Serum inhibin B also correlated to follicular fluid inhibin B (p < 0.01). Inhibin B was not correlated to pregnancy. In contrast, the ratio IGF-I/IGFBP-1 in serum as well as in follicular fluid was significantly higher in women who became pregnant (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: The results show that inhibin B in serum 2 days before oocyte retrieval predicts number of oocytes retrieved. Since inhibin B in serum before oocyte retrieval in ovarian hyperstimulation was strongly predictive of the number of oocytes retrieved, it appears useful as a marker for ovarian response. Inhibin B did not predict treatment outcome, whereas the ratio IGF-I/IGFBP-1 in serum and follicular fluid was significantly higher in women who became pregnant. The ratio IGF-I/IGFBP-1 may thus reflect oocyte quality.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3455298PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1023656225053DOI Listing
May 2003

[Neglected investigations of infertile men. The decreasing sperm count is alarming].

Lakartidningen 2002 Feb;99(9):906-8, 911-3

Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm.

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February 2002
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