Publications by authors named "Annette E Aalborg"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Implementation of adolescent family-based substance use prevention programs in health care settings: Comparisons across conditions and programs.

Health Educ J 2012 Jan 29;71(1):53-61. Epub 2010 Dec 29.

Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, CA.

BACKGROUND: The majority of knowledge related to implementation of family-based substance use prevention programs is based on programs delivered in school and community settings. The aim of this study is to examine procedures related to implementation effectiveness and quality of two family-based universal substance use prevention programs delivered in health care settings, the Strengthening Families Program: For Parents and Youth 10-14 (SFP) and Family Matters (FM). These evidence-based programs were delivered as part of a larger random control intervention study designed to assess the influence of program choice vs. assignment on study participation and adolescent substance use outcomes. We also assess the effects of program choice (vs. assignment to program) on program delivery. METHODS: A mixed method case study was conducted to assess procedures used to maximize implementation quality and fidelity of family-based prevention programs delivered in health care settings. Families with an 11 year old child were randomly selected for study participation from health plan membership databases of 4 large urban medical centers in the San Francisco Bay Area. Eligible families were initially randomized to a Choice study condition (families choose SFP or FM) or Assigned study condition (assigned to FM, SFP or control group); 494 ethnically diverse families were selected for participation in study programs. RESULTS: Successful implementation of family prevention programs in health care settings required knowledge of the health care environment and familiarity with established procedures for developing ongoing support and collaboration. Ongoing training of program deliverers utilizing data from fidelity assessment appeared to contribute to improved program fidelity over the course of the study. Families who chose FM completed the program in a shorter period (p<.0001) and spent more time implementing program activities (p=0.02) compared to families assigned to FM. SFP "choice" families attended more sessions than those assigned to SFP (3.5 vs. 2.8), (p=0.07). CONCLUSION: Program choice appeared to increase family engagement in programs. The goals and approach of universal family-based substance use prevention programs are congruent with the aims and protocols of adolescent preventive health care services. Future effectiveness trials should assess approaches to integrate evidence-based family prevention programs with adolescent health services.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0017896910386209DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3438912PMC
January 2012

Parent and child characteristics related to chosen adolescent alcohol and drug prevention program.

Health Educ Res 2012 Feb 8;27(1):1-13. Epub 2011 Dec 8.

Prevention Research Center, Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, 1995 University Avenue, Suite 450, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA.

Mothers were allowed to choose between two different family-based adolescent alcohol-drug prevention strategies and the choice was examined in relation to parent and teen characteristics. Under real world conditions, parents are making choices regarding health promotion strategies for their adolescents and little is known about how parent and teen characteristics interact with programs chosen. The two programs were: Family Matters (FM) (Bauman KE, Foshee VA, Ennett ST et al. Family Matters: a family-directed program designed to prevent adolescent tobacco and alcohol use. Health Promot Pract 2001; 2: 81-96) and Strengthening Families Program (SFP) 10-14 (Spoth R, Redmond C, Lepper H. Alcohol initiation outcomes of universal family-focused preventive interventions: one- and two-year follow-ups of a controlled study. J Stud Alcohol Suppl 1999; 13: 103-11). A total of 272 families with an 11-12 years old enrolled in health care centers were in the choice condition of the larger study. SFP requires group meetings at specified times and thus demanded more specific time commitments from families. In contrast, FM is self-directed through booklets and is delivered in the home at a time chosen by the families. Mothers were significantly more likely to choose SFP when the adolescent had more problem behaviors. Mothers with greater education were more likely to choose FM. Findings may provide more real-world understanding of how some families are more likely to engage in one type of intervention over another. This understanding offers practical information for developing health promotion systems to service the diversity of families in the community.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/her/cyr109DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3258283PMC
February 2012

The relationship between neighborhood characteristics and recruitment into adolescent family-based substance use prevention programs.

J Behav Health Serv Res 2012 Apr;39(2):174-89

Prevention Research Center, Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, 1995 University Ave., Suite 450, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA.

Youth in disadvantaged neighborhoods are at risk for poor health outcomes. Characteristics of these neighborhoods may translate into intensified risk due to barriers utilizing preventive care such as substance use prevention programs. While family-level risks affect recruitment into prevention programs, few studies have addressed the influence of neighborhood risks. This study consists of 744 families with an 11- to 12-year-old child recruited for a family-based substance use prevention program. Using US Census data, logistic regressions showed neighborhoods were related to recruitment, beyond individual characteristics. Greater neighborhood unemployment was related to decreased agreement to participate in the study and lower rates of high school graduation were related to lower levels of actual enrolment. Conversely, higher rates of single-female-headed households were related to increased agreement. Recruitment procedures may need to recognize the variety of barriers and enabling forces within the neighborhood in developing different strategies for the recruitment of youth and their families.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11414-011-9260-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3276736PMC
April 2012

Implementation fidelity in adolescent family-based prevention programs: relationship to family engagement.

Health Educ Res 2010 Aug 8;25(4):531-41. Epub 2010 Feb 8.

Prevention Research Center, Pacific Institute for Research.valuation, 1995 University Avenue, Suite 450, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA.

Reliability and validity of intervention studies are impossible without adequate program fidelity, as it ensures that the intervention was implemented as designed and allows for accurate conclusions about effectiveness (Bellg AJ, Borrelli B, Resnick B et al. Enhancing treatment fidelity in health behavior change studies: best practices and recommendations from the NIH behavior change consortium. Health Psychol 2004; 23: 443-51). This study examines the relation between program fidelity with family engagement (i.e. satisfaction and participation) in family-based prevention programs for adolescent alcohol, tobacco or other drug use. Families (n = 381) were those with an 11- to 12-year-old child enrolled in Kaiser Permanente in the San Francisco area. Families participated in one of two programs: Strengthening Families Program: For Parents and Youth 10-14 (SFP) (Spoth R, Redmond C, Lepper H. Alcohol initiation outcomes of universal family-focused preventive interventions: one- and two-year follow-ups of a controlled study. J Stud Alcohol Suppl 1999; 13: 103-11) or Family Matters (FM) (Bauman KE, Ennett ST. On the importance of peer influence for adolescent drug use: commonly neglected considerations. Addiction 1996; 91: 185-98). Fidelity was assessed by: (i) adherence to the program manual and (ii) quality of implementation. No relationships were found for FM, a self-directed program. For SFP, higher quality scores were related to higher parent satisfaction. Higher adherence scores were related to higher satisfaction for youth, yet surprisingly to lower satisfaction for parents. Parent sessions involve much discussion, and to obtain high adherence scores, health educators were often required to limit this to implement all program activities. Findings highlight a delivery challenge in covering all activities while allowing parents to engage in mutually supportive behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/her/cyq006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2905922PMC
August 2010

Influence of the social environment on children's school travel.

Prev Med 2010 Jan 29;50 Suppl 1:S65-8. Epub 2009 Sep 29.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 317 New East Bldg, CB 3140, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3140, USA.

Objectives: To analyze the association between parental perceptions of the social environment and walking and biking to school among 10-14-year-olds.

Methods: Surveys were conducted with 432 parents of 10-14-year-olds in the San Francisco Bay Area during 2006 and 2007; the final sample size was 357. The social environment was measured with a 3-item scale assessing child-centered social control. Unadjusted and adjusted differences in rates of active travel to school were compared between families reporting high levels of social control in their neighborhood and those reporting low or neutral levels of social control. Adjusted differences were computed by matching respondents on child and household characteristics and distance to school.

Results: Of children whose parents reported high levels of social control, 37% walked or biked to school, compared with 24% of children whose parents reported low or neutral levels. The adjusted difference between the two groups was 10 percentage points (p=0.04). The association was strongest for girls and non-Hispanic whites.

Conclusions: Higher levels of parent-perceived child-centered social control are associated with more walking and biking to school. Increasing physical activity through active travel to school may require intervention programs to address the social environment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2009.08.016DOI Listing
January 2010
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