Publications by authors named "Aniruddha Maiti"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Brolucizumab in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration - Indian Real-World Experience: The BRAILLE Study.

Clin Ophthalmol 2021 7;15:3787-3795. Epub 2021 Sep 7.

Department of Vitreoretinal Services, Disha Eye Hospitals, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

Purpose: To assess the short-term efficacy and safety profile of intravitreal brolucizumab injection in Indian eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) under real-world conditions.

Patients And Methods: This was a multicenter, retrospective chart review of 94 eyes of 94 patients with nAMD (treatment-naïve and switch-therapy) undergoing brolucizumab therapy. Re-treatment as per pro-re-nata protocol was performed based on fixed visual and tomographic criteria. The main outcome measures were changes in the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraretinal fluid (IRF), subretinal fluid (SRF), central subfield thickness (CST), and pigment epithelial detachment (PED) along with safety analysis.

Results: Of the 94 eyes, 20 eyes (21.3%) were treatment-naïve, whereas the rest 74 eyes (78.7%) underwent switch therapy. One hundred and twenty-six injections were given over a mean follow-up of 7.3 ± 2.2 (range 5-30) weeks. The BCVA improved significantly from 0.82 ± 0.5 LogMAR at baseline to 0.66 ± 0.5 LogMAR at the final visit (p < 0.0001). Significant reduction in CST was simultaneously noted (Baseline: 408.45 ± 65.63 µm; Final: 281.14 ± 37.74 µm; p < 0.0001). On qualitative analysis, resolution of subretinal fluid (SRF), intraretinal fluid (IRF), and pigment epithelial detachment (PED) was observed in 15.5%, 39.29%, and 23.81% of the eyes, respectively. The mean interval of repeat injection was 10.2 ± 2.1 weeks. Three episodes of ocular adverse drug reaction were reported, including two patients developing subretinal hemorrhage while one having a retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) tear. Notably, no intraocular inflammation (IOI) was seen in any of the eyes, and no systemic side effects were identified.

Conclusion: In a real-world scenario, brolucizumab therapy is efficacious and safe in the management of nAMD over the short term. Further long-term studies are warranted to validate these findings. Additionally, lack of ocular inflammation after 126 brolucizumab injections in our Indian data is peculiar and underlines the necessity to explore the role of race and genetics in predisposing to/safeguarding against brolucizumab-related IOIs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S328160DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8434835PMC
September 2021

Geographic clustering of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in New Jersey: an exploratory analysis using residential histories.

Cancer Causes Control 2021 Sep 12;32(9):989-999. Epub 2021 Jun 12.

Department of Health, New Jersey State Cancer Registry, Trenton, NJ, USA.

Purpose: Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Previous studies have reported geographic clustering of CTCL based on the residence at the time of diagnosis. We explore geographic clustering of CTCL using both the residence at the time of diagnosis and past residences using data from the New Jersey State Cancer Registry.

Methods: CTCL cases (n = 1,163) diagnosed between 2006-2014 were matched to colon cancer controls (n = 17,049) on sex, age, race/ethnicity, and birth year. Jacquez's Q-Statistic was used to identify temporal clustering of cases compared to controls. Geographic clustering was assessed using the Bernoulli-based scan-statistic to compare cases to controls, and the Poisson-based scan-statisic to compare the observed number of cases to the number expected based on the general population. Significant clusters (p < 0.05) were mapped, and standard incidence ratios (SIR) reported. We adjusted for diagnosis year, sex, and age.

Results: The Q-statistic identified significant temporal clustering of cases based on past residences in the study area from 1992 to 2002. A cluster was detected in 1992 in Bergen County in northern New Jersey based on the Bernoulli (1992 SIR 1.84) and Poisson (1992 SIR 1.86) scan-statistics. Using the Poisson scan-statistic with the diagnosis location, we found evidence of an elevated risk in this same area, but the results were not statistically significant.

Conclusion: There is evidence of geographic clustering of CTCL cases in New Jersey based on past residences. Additional studies are necessary to understand the possible reasons for the excess of CTCL cases living in this specific area some 8-14 years prior to diagnosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10552-021-01452-yDOI Listing
September 2021

Measuring Neighborhood Landscapes: Associations between a Neighborhood's Landscape Characteristics and Colon Cancer Survival.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 04 29;18(9). Epub 2021 Apr 29.

Department of Geography and Urban Studies, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA.

Landscape characteristics have been shown to influence health outcomes, but few studies have examined their relationship with cancer survival. We used data from the National Land Cover Database to examine associations between regional-stage colon cancer survival and 27 different landscape metrics. The study population included all adult New Jersey residents diagnosed between 2006 and 2011. Cases were followed until 31 December 2016 (N = 3949). Patient data were derived from the New Jersey State Cancer Registry and were linked to LexisNexis to obtain residential histories. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI95) for the different landscape metrics. An increasing proportion of high-intensity developed lands with 80-100% impervious surfaces per cell/pixel was significantly associated with the risk of colon cancer death (HR = 1.006; CI95 = 1.002-1.01) after controlling for neighborhood poverty and other individual-level factors. In contrast, an increase in the aggregation and connectivity of vegetation-dominated low-intensity developed lands with 20-<40% impervious surfaces per cell/pixel was significantly associated with the decrease in risk of death from colon cancer (HR = 0.996; CI95 = 0.992-0.999). Reducing impervious surfaces in residential areas may increase the aesthetic value and provide conditions more advantageous to a healthy lifestyle, such as walking. Further research is needed to understand how these landscape characteristics impact survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094728DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8124655PMC
April 2021

Safety and efficacy of Razumab™ (world's first biosimilar ranibizumab) in wet age-related macular degeneration: a post-marketing, prospective ASSET study.

Int J Retina Vitreous 2021 Mar 24;7(1):24. Epub 2021 Mar 24.

Clinical Development & Medical Affairs, Intas Pharmaceuticals Ltd. (Biopharma), Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.

Background: Razumab™ (world's first biosimilar ranibizumab) is approved for several macular disorders including wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We evaluated the safety and efficacy of biosimilar ranibizumab in wet AMD.

Methods: This prospective, multicentre, rAnibizumab bioSimilar Safety Efficacy postmarkeTing (ASSET) study enrolled patients aged ≥ 50 years with wet AMD having best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) between 20/40 and 20/320. The patients received intravitreal biosimilar ranibizumab 0.5 mg every 4 weeks for 24 weeks. Safety endpoints included the incidence of adverse events (AEs), serious AEs (SAEs), and immunoreactivity after 6 months. The efficacy endpoints were the proportion of patients who lose fewer than 15 letters, increase in BCVA, change in central retinal thickness (CRT), and change in Visual Function Questionnaire-25 (VFQ-25) score, from baseline to 24 weeks.

Results: Of the 126 enrolled patients, majority (95.24%) of the patients received all 6 doses of biosimilar ranibizumab (total 3 mg). Nineteen AEs were reported (n = 16; 12.7%); majority (78.9%) were mild. There were no serious AEs reported, except one AE of death which was unrelated to the study drug. None of the patients discontinued the study due to an AE. The most common ocular AE was increase in intraocular pressure (4 events) and non-ocular AE was pyrexia (5 events). A total of 7.9% (10/126) patients prior to dosing and 7.1% (9/126) patients post-treatment were positive for anti-ranibizumab antibodies. No AEs suggestive of immunogenicity were noted. At 24-weeks, 97.60% patients in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population (N = 125) and 97.41% patients in the per-protocol (PP) population (N = 116) lost < 15 letters from baseline visual acuity. In the ITT and PP populations, 31.20% and 32.76% patients, respectively, showed improved visual acuity by ≥ 15 letters. Significant improvements in BCVA (mean difference: 8.8, 9.2, p < 0.001 for ITT, PP) and VFQ-25 (8.5, 9.2, p < 0.001 for ITT, PP) were seen; CRT reduced significantly (125 µm, 119.3 µm, p < 0.001 for ITT, PP).

Conclusion: Razumab™ (world's first biosimilar ranibizumab) was well-tolerated without new safety concerns and significantly improved visual acuity in wet AMD patients. Trial registration CTRI/2016/03/006739. Registered 18 March 2016-Prospectively registered, http://ctri.nic.in/Clinicaltrials/pmaindet2.php?trialid=13141&EncHid=&userName=2016/03/006739.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40942-021-00293-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7992797PMC
March 2021

Residential Mobility and Geospatial Disparities in Colon Cancer Survival.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2020 11 5;29(11):2119-2125. Epub 2020 Aug 5.

Department of Geography and Urban Studies, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Background: Identifying geospatial cancer survival disparities is critical to focus interventions and prioritize efforts with limited resources. Incorporating residential mobility into spatial models may result in different geographic patterns of survival compared with the standard approach using a single location based on the patient's residence at the time of diagnosis.

Methods: Data on 3,949 regional-stage colon cancer cases diagnosed from 2006 to 2011 and followed until December 31, 2016, were obtained from the New Jersey State Cancer Registry. Geographic disparity based on the spatial variance and effect sizes from a Bayesian spatial model using residence at diagnosis was compared with a time-varying spatial model using residential histories [adjusted for sex, gender, substage, race/ethnicity, and census tract (CT) poverty]. Geographic estimates of risk of colon cancer death were mapped.

Results: Most patients (65%) remained at the same residence, 22% changed CT, and 12% moved out of state. The time-varying model produced a wider range of adjusted risk of colon cancer death (0.85-1.20 vs. 0.94-1.11) and resulted in greater geographic disparity statewide after adjustment (25.5% vs. 14.2%) compared with the model with only the residence at diagnosis.

Conclusions: Including residential mobility may allow for more precise estimates of spatial risk of death. Results based on the traditional approach using only residence at diagnosis were not substantially different for regional stage colon cancer in New Jersey.

Impact: Including residential histories opens up new avenues of inquiry to better understand the complex relationships between people and places, and the effect of residential mobility on cancer outcomes..
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-20-0772DOI Listing
November 2020

Socioeconomic Disparities in Colon Cancer Survival: Revisiting Neighborhood Poverty Using Residential Histories.

Epidemiology 2020 09;31(5):728-735

From the Department of Geography and Urban Studies, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA.

Background: Residential histories linked to cancer registry data provide new opportunities to examine cancer outcomes by neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES). We examined differences in regional stage colon cancer survival estimates comparing models using a single neighborhood SES at diagnosis to models using neighborhood SES from residential histories.

Methods: We linked regional stage colon cancers from the New Jersey State Cancer Registry diagnosed from 2006 to 2011 to LexisNexis administrative data to obtain residential histories. We defined neighborhood SES as census tract poverty based on location at diagnosis and across the follow-up period through 31 December 2016 based on residential histories (average, time-weighted average, time-varying). Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we estimated associations between colon cancer and census tract poverty measurements (continuous and categorical), adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, regional substage, and mover status.

Results: Sixty-five percent of the sample was nonmovers (one census tract); 35% (movers) changed tract at least once. Cases from tracts with >20% poverty changed residential tracts more often (42%) than cases from tracts with <5% poverty (32%). Hazard ratios (HRs) were generally similar in strength and direction across census tract poverty measurements. In time-varying models, cases in the highest poverty category (>20%) had a 30% higher risk of regional stage colon cancer death than cases in the lowest category (<5%) (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.04, 1.63).

Conclusion: Residential changes after regional stage colon cancer diagnosis may be associated with a higher risk of colon cancer death among cases in high-poverty areas. This has important implications for postdiagnostic access to care for treatment and follow-up surveillance. See video abstract: http://links.lww.com/EDE/B705.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0000000000001216DOI Listing
September 2020

A multi-fold string kernel for sequence classification.

Annu Int Conf IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2015 ;2015:6469-72

A novel framework is proposed to classify biological sequences using a kernel. It considers the topological information along with the primary structural information. The widely used string kernel for sequence classification does not take into account the structural information which might be available for biological sequences. The proposed kernels incorporate the additional structural information and thus make the features more informative.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2015.7319874DOI Listing
September 2016

Structural prediction of dynamic Bayesian network with partial prior information.

IEEE Trans Nanobioscience 2015 Jan 13;14(1):95-103. Epub 2014 Oct 13.

The prediction of the structure of a hidden dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) from a noisy dataset is an important and challenging task. This work presents a generalized framework to infer the DBN network structure with partial prior information. In the proposed framework, the partial information about the network structure is provided in the form of prior. The proposed method makes use of the prior information regarding the presence and as well as absence of some of the edges. Using the noisy dataset and partial prior information, this method is able to infer nearly accurate structure of the network. The proposed method is validated using simulated datasets. In addition, two real biological datasets are used to infer hidden biological interaction networks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TNB.2014.2361838DOI Listing
January 2015

On the Monte-Carlo expectation maximization for finding motifs in DNA sequences.

IEEE J Biomed Health Inform 2015 Mar 8;19(2):677-86. Epub 2014 May 8.

Finding conserved locations or motifs in genomic sequences is of paramount importance. Expectation maximization (EM)-based algorithms are widely employed to solve motif finding problems. The present study proposes a novel initialization technique and model-shifting scheme for Monte-Carlo-based EM methods for motif finding. Two popular EM-based motif finding algorithms are compared to the proposed method, which offers improved motif prediction accuracy on a synthetic dataset and a true biological dataset.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/JBHI.2014.2322694DOI Listing
March 2015

Principal components' analysis of multifocal electroretinogram in retinitis pigmentosa.

Indian J Ophthalmol 2011 Sep-Oct;59(5):353-7

Department of Vitreo-Retinal Services, Aditya Jyot Eye Hospital Pvt Ltd, Plot No: 153, Road No 9, Major Parmeswaran Road, Wadala, Mumbai - 400 031, India.

Aims: To determine waveforms of multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) contributing significantly to the overall retinal response by using principal components' analysis.

Settings And Design: Prospective, non-randomized, single-visit, observational, case-control study from a single tertiary ophthalmic center.

Materials And Methods: Patients with various forms of RP underwent mfERG testing for a period of one year. The first-order kernel responses of RP cases were compared with concurrently recruited healthy controls.

Statistical Analysis Used: Parametric data was analyzed using the unpaired t test for differences between the implicit time and amplitudes of cases and controls. Principal components' analysis was done for each implicit time and amplitude in cases with RP using the Varimax rotation method.

Results: From March 2006 to March 2007, 24 cases with typical RP (56%, 47 eyes) were included in the final analysis. Their mean age was 33.7 years (19-69 ± 15.5 years). Comparison of latencies and amplitudes among RP cases with log MAR acuity ≤ 0.18 and those > 0.18, revealed significant difference in the implicit time (P1) in Ring 2 only (P=0.028). Two components (predominently from Ring 1 and 2) each contributing 66.8% and 88.8% of the total variance in the data for latencies and amplitudes respectively, were seen.

Conclusions: The first two rings of the mfERG contributed to the variance of waveforms in RP, irrespective of the visual acuity and poor visual field results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0301-4738.83610DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3159315PMC
January 2012

Autofluorescence imaging.

Ophthalmology 2008 Oct;115(10):1853-4; author reply 1854

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ophtha.2008.06.028DOI Listing
October 2008

Correspondence.

Retina 2008 Mar;28(3):527; author reply 527-8

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/IAE.0b013e31815f3c74DOI Listing
March 2008

Aspergillus-induced malignant glaucoma.

Cornea 2007 Jul;26(6):762-3

Department of Cornea and External Diseases, Aditya Jyot Eye Hospital Pvt Ltd, Wadala, Mumbai, India.

Purpose: To report a case of Aspergillus flavus-induced keratomycotic malignant glaucoma.

Methods: A 48-year-old woman presented with a severe corneal ulcer. She had received topical steroids for 10 days before presentation.

Results: Microbiological studies revealed A. flavus as the offending pathogen. Nonresponsive high intraocular pressure with associated shallow anterior chamber was present. With a diagnosis of keratomycotic malignant glaucoma, the patient underwent therapeutic keratoplasty with cataract extraction with posterior chamber wash. However, there was a recurrence of malignant glaucoma in the postoperative period. Patient underwent limited pars plana vitrectomy.

Conclusions: Keratomycotic malignant glaucoma is a rare complication of severe fungal ulcer. We believe that the use of topical steroids in this case probably led to increased fungal penetration, with the formation of a lens-iris fungal mass and subsequent malignant glaucoma. Nonresponse to medical therapy warrants urgent surgical intervention. To the best of our knowledge, Aspergillus-induced keratomycotic glaucoma has never been reported previously. This report also highlights that therapeutic keratoplasty with cataract extraction alone may not be sufficient for management of such cases, and a limited pars plana vitrectomy may be needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ICO.0b013e31805fc37bDOI Listing
July 2007

Unilateral loss of vision following snakebite.

J Indian Med Assoc 2006 Jul;104(7):404-5

Department of Ophthalmology, Regional Institute of Ophthalmology, Kolkata.

A 14- year-old boy presented at the outpatients' department with the complaint of visual loss in the right eye of 1 1/2 months duration. He had the history of snakebite for which he was admitted to hospital. The diminution of vision started next day after snakebite. On examination, he had no perception of light in his right eye. USG B scan showed vitreous haemorrhage in his right eye. He was given IV methylpredinisolone. At follow-up after one month he still had no perception of light in his right eye with the haemorrhage in the vitreous subsided.
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July 2006
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