23 results match your criteria transplantation lsct

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Immunocytochemistry of the ocular surface after different techniques of limbal stem cell transplantation for chronic chemical burns.

Br J Ophthalmol 2020 Dec 16. Epub 2020 Dec 16.

Ophthalmology, Guru Nanak Eye Centre, New Delhi, Delhi, India.

Aim: To compare the immunocytochemistry (ICC) on impression cytology of corneal surface epithelium after simple limbal epithelial transplantation (SLET) and conjunctival-limbal autograft (CLAU).

Methods: A prospective study of 20 patients above 1 year of age with chronic chemical burns, who underwent limbal stem cell transplantation (LSCT). They were divided equally in group A (SLET) and group B (CLAU). Read More

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December 2020

Characteristics and mechanisms to control a COVID-19 outbreak on a leukemia and stem cell transplantation unit.

Cancer Med 2021 01 12;10(1):237-246. Epub 2020 Dec 12.

Department of Internal Medicine, Diakonie Hospital Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany.

Immunosuppressed patients like patients with leukemia or lymphoma, but also patients after autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplantation are at particular risk for an infection with COVID-19. We describe a COVID-19 outbreak on our leukemia and stem cell transplantation unit (LSCT-Unit) originating from a patient with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. The patient was treated with intensive induction chemotherapy and we characterize the subsequent outbreak of COVID-19 on a LSCT-Unit. Read More

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January 2021

Outcomes of Limbal Stem Cell Transplant: A Meta-analysis.

JAMA Ophthalmol 2020 06;138(6):660-670

David Geffen School of Medicine, Stein Eye Institute, Cornea Division, University of California, Los Angeles.

Importance: Limbal stem cell transplant (LSCT) can be categorized as direct autologous limbal transplant (AULT), direct allogenic limbal transplant (ALLT), cultivated autologous limbal stem cells transplant (cAULT), and cultivated allogenic limbal stem cells transplant (cALLT). To our knowledge, there is no study directly comparing the outcomes and complications of these procedures.

Objective: To evaluate the outcomes of different LSCT procedures. Read More

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Management of Congenital Aniridia-Associated Keratopathy: Long-Term Outcomes from a Tertiary Referral Center.

Am J Ophthalmol 2020 02 12;210:8-18. Epub 2019 Nov 12.

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Electronic address:

Purpose: To report the outcomes of medical and surgical management for congenital aniridia-associated keratopathy (AAK) over a long-term follow-up period.

Design: Retrospective, comparative case series.

Methods: Medical records of patients diagnosed with congenital aniridia were retrospectively reviewed. Read More

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February 2020

Autologous limbal stem cell transplantation: a systematic review of clinical outcomes with different surgical techniques.

Br J Ophthalmol 2020 02 22;104(2):247-253. Epub 2019 May 22.

Center for Ocular Regeneration (CORE), LV Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India

Purpose: To conduct a systematic review on outcomes of three different techniques of autologous limbal stem cell transplantation (LSCT): conjunctival-limbal autografting (CLAu), cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation (CLET) and simple limbal epithelial transplantation (SLET), in unilateral limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD).

Methods: Literature searches were conducted in MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase, Web of Science and Cochrane Central Register. Standard systematic review methodology was followed using Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines. Read More

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February 2020

Amniotic membrane transplantation with or without autologous cultivated limbal stem cell transplantation for the management of partial limbal stem cell deficiency.

Clin Ophthalmol 2018 17;12:2103-2106. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Cornea, Cataract and External Disease Services, Refractive Surgery Service, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA,

Purpose: To compare the outcomes of amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) vs cultivated limbal stem cell transplantation (LSCT) in eyes with partial limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) following chemical burns.

Methods: Eyes with unilateral partial LSCD (#180° involvement) were randomized in two groups to undergo either pannus resection combined with AMT or pannus resection combined with LSCT in a tertiary eye care hospital. Primary outcome measures were time to corneal epithelialization and absence of conjunctivalization of the cornea. Read More

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October 2018

Primary limbal stem cell transplantation in the surgical management of extensive ocular surface squamous neoplasia involving the limbus.

Indian J Ophthalmol 2018 Nov;66(11):1569-1573

Oculoplasty, Orbit and Ocular Oncology Services, Centre for Sight, Hyderabad, Telangana, India.

Purpose: To determine the role of primary limbal stem cell transplantation (LSCT) in managing extensive ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) with more than 3 quadrants of limbal involvement to prevent manifestations of limbal stem cell deficiency.

Methods: A multi-center, comparative, and interventional clinical study of cases and historical controls was done. Patients with a limbal mass suggestive of OSSN involving more than 3 quadrants of limbus (> 9 clock hours) and no local, regional or systemic metastasis, who underwent primary surgical excision with or without adjuvant chemotherapy and had a minimum follow-up of 12 months were included in this study. Read More

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November 2018

Limbal Stem Cell Transplantation and Complications.

Semin Ophthalmol 2018 27;33(1):134-141. Epub 2017 Nov 27.

a Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology , Harvard Medical School , Boston , MA , USA.

Corneal epithelial stem cells are adult somatic stem cells located at the limbus and represent the ultimate source of transparent corneal epithelium. When these limbal stem cells become dysfunctional or deficient, limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) develops. LSCD is a major cause of corneal scarring and is particularly prevalent in chemical and thermal burns of the ocular surface. Read More

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February 2018

Native and synthetic scaffolds for limbal epithelial stem cell transplantation.

Acta Biomater 2018 Jan 6;65:21-35. Epub 2017 Nov 6.

School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address:

Limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) is a complex blinding disease of the cornea, which cannot be treated with conventional corneal transplants. Instead, a stem cell (SC) graft is required to replenish the limbal epithelial stem cell (LESC) reservoir, which is ultimately responsible for regenerating the corneal epithelium. Current therapies utilize limbal tissue biopsies that harbor LESCs as well as tissue culture expanded cells. Read More

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January 2018

The role of amniotic membrane extract eye drop (AMEED) in in vivo cultivation of limbal stem cells.

Ocul Surf 2018 01 8;16(1):146-153. Epub 2017 Nov 8.

Department of Regenerative Medicine, Cell Science Research Center, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Limbal stem cell transplantation (LSCT) is the definitive treatment for total limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). This study evaluates the anatomical and visual outcomes of a surgical technique supplemented by amniotic membrane extract eye drop (AMEED) for in vivo cultivation of limbal stem cells (LSCs).

Methods: One small limbal block (2 × 1 mm) harvested from the contralateral healthy eye was transferred to the diseased eye, which had been already covered by cryopreserved amniotic membrane (N = 20). Read More

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January 2018

Limbal Stem Cells from Aged Donors Are a Suitable Source for Clinical Application.

Stem Cells Int 2016 30;2016:3032128. Epub 2016 Nov 30.

CellTec-UB, Department of Cell Biology, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Barcelona Tissue Bank (BTB), Banc de Sang I Teixits (BST, GenCAT), Barcelona, Spain; Department of Surgery, School of Medicine & Hospital Clinic of Barcelona (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

Limbal stem cells (LSC) are the progenitor cells that maintain the transparency of the cornea. Limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) leads to corneal opacity, inflammation, scarring, and blindness. A clinical approach to treat this condition consists in LSC transplantation (LSCT) after expansion of LSC. Read More

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November 2016

Allogenic cultivated limbal stem cell transplantation versus cadaveric keratolimbal allograft in ocular surface disorder: 1-year outcome.

Int Ophthalmol 2017 Dec 26;37(6):1323-1331. Epub 2016 Dec 26.

Department of Histopathology, Fortis Hospital Vasant Kunj, New Delhi, India.

Purpose: To compare the outcome of allogenic ex vivo cultivated limbal stem cell transplantation (LSCT) versus cadaveric keratolimbal allograft in patients with limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD).

Methods: In this prospective interventional study from Army Hospital Research and Referral in New Delhi, 50 eyes of 40 patients with ocular surface disorder having LSCD underwent either cultivated LSCT (group 1: 25 eyes of 20 patients) or keratolimbal allograft transplantation (group 2: 25 eyes of 20 patients). The outcome measures were gain of two or more lines of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), absence of conjunctival vascularization over cornea, corneal neovascularization regression, regression of visually significant corneal opacity (iris details poorly visible), Schirmer's 1 ≥10 s, tear break-up time (TBUT) ≥10 s, and absence of fluorescein staining. Read More

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December 2017

Reconstruction of damaged corneal epithelium using Venus-labeled limbal epithelial stem cells and tracking of surviving donor cells.

Exp Eye Res 2013 Oct 8;115:246-54. Epub 2013 Aug 8.

College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A&F University, Shaanxi Stem Cell Engineering and Technology Center, Yangling 712100, China.

Limbal epithelial stem cells are responsible for the self-renewal and replenishment of the corneal epithelium. Although it is possible to repair the ocular surface using limbal stem cell transplantation, the mechanisms behind this therapy are unclear. To investigate the distribution of surviving donor cells in a reconstructed corneal epithelium, we screened a Venus-labeled limbal stem cell strain in goats. Read More

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October 2013

Visual rehabilitation with keratoprosthesis after tenonplasty as the primary globe-saving procedure for severe ocular chemical injuries.

Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol 2012 Dec 1;250(12):1787-93. Epub 2012 May 1.

Medical & Vision Research Foundation, 18 College Road, Chennai, 600 006, Tamil Nadu, India.

Purpose: To analyze the outcome (functional and anatomic) of eyes that underwent tenonplasty as the primary globe-saving procedure in severe ocular chemical injuries (grade V-VI Dua's classification).

Methods: The records of patients who underwent tenonplasty for associated scleral ischemia in severe chemical burns in our institute between October 2005 and June 2011 were analyzed retrospectively. Out of 31 eyes that underwent tenonplasty, 21 belonged to grade V and VI of Dua's classification with diffuse scleral ischemia for which a four-quadrant tenonplasty was performed and only these 21 eyes were included for further analysis. Read More

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December 2012

Cytological features of live limbal tissue donor eyes for autograft or allograft limbal stem cell transplantation.

Arq Bras Oftalmol 2011 Jul-Aug;74(4):248-50

Department of Ophthalmology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Purpose: To evaluate by impression cytology (IC) the corneal surface of live limbal tissue donor eyes for autograft or allograft limbal stem cell transplantation (LSCT).

Methods: Twenty limbal donors were enrolled (17 for autograft LSCT and 3 for allograft). Impression cytology was performed before transplantation of superior and inferior limbal grafts and after the third postoperative month. Read More

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[Establishment of goat limbal stem cell strain expressing Venus fluorescent protein and construction of limbal epithelial sheets].

Sheng Wu Gong Cheng Xue Bao 2010 Dec;26(12):1636-44

Shaanxi Stem Cell Engineering and Technology Research Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A & F University, Yangling 712100, China.

The integrity and transparency of cornea plays a key role in vision. Limbal Stem Cells (LSCs) are precursors of cornea, which are responsible for self-renewal and replenishing corneal epithelium. Though it is successful to cell replacement therapy for impairing ocular surface by Limbal Stem Cell Transplantation (LSCT), the mechanism of renew is unclear after LSCT. Read More

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December 2010

Long-term outcomes of autolimbal and allolimbal transplants.

Ophthalmology 2010 Jun 16;117(6):1207-13. Epub 2010 Feb 16.

Division of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Nottingham, England.

Objective: To evaluate the long-term results of limbal stem cell transplantation (LSCT) in patients with ocular surface (OS) disease.

Design: Retrospective consecutive cohort study.

Participants: Case records of 27 eyes of 26 patients (19 males and 7 females) who presented with unilateral or bilateral total limbal stem cell deficiency and treated at the Department of Ophthalmology were examined. Read More

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Limbal stem cell transplantation: an evidence-based analysis.

Authors:

Ont Health Technol Assess Ser 2008 1;8(7):1-58. Epub 2008 Oct 1.

Objective: The objective of this analysis is to systematically review limbal stem cell transplantation (LSCT) for the treatment of patients with limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). This evidence-based analysis reviews LSCT as a primary treatment for nonpterygium LSCD conditions, and LSCT as an adjuvant therapy to excision for the treatment of pterygium.

Background:

Clinical Need: CONDITION AND TARGET POPULATION The outer surface of the eye is covered by 2 distinct cell layers: the corneal epithelial layer that overlies the cornea, and the conjunctival epithelial layer that overlies the sclera. Read More

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October 2012

A comparison between cultivated and conventional limbal stem cell transplantation for Stevens-Johnson syndrome.

Am J Ophthalmol 2007 Jan 1;143(1):178-80. Epub 2006 Sep 1.

Department of Ophthalmology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, 465 Kaiji-cho, Hirokoji-agani, Kawaramachi-dori, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto 602-0841, Japan.

Purpose: To compare the resolution of inflammation and long-term results of cultivated and conventional limbal stem cell transplantation (LSCT) in a patient with Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS).

Design: Interventional case report.

Methods: A 32-year-old man with SJS and bilateral total limbal stem cell deficiency underwent cultivated LSCT in the right eye, followed by conventional LSCT in the left eye three weeks later. Read More

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January 2007

Limbal graft and/or amniotic membrane transplantation in the treatment of ocular burns.

Ophthalmologica 2005 Sep-Oct;219(5):297-302

Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Sestre milosrdnice, Zagreb, Croatia.

Limbal stem cell transplantation (LSCT) and amniotic membrane transplantation may improve corneal recovery after a chemical burn. Amniotic membrane was applied as a patch in 5 eyes; LSCT from healthy contralateral eye was performed in 6 eyes, and a combination of these techniques was performed in 4 eyes. There were no complications during surgical procedure. Read More

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September 2005

Limbal stem cell transplantation in chronic inflammatory eye disease.

Ophthalmology 2002 May;109(5):862-8

Ocular Immunology and Uveitis Service, Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA.

Objective: The goal of this study was to describe the outcome of limbal stem cell transplantation (LSCT) in patients with severe ocular surface disease caused by underlying chronic inflammatory eye disease.

Design: Retrospective noncomparative case series.

Participants: Nine patients with limbal stem cell deficiency caused by an underlying ocular inflammatory disease who underwent LSCT. Read More

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Limbal stem cell transplantation for the treatment of subepithelial amyloidosis of the cornea (gelatinous drop-like dystrophy).

Cornea 2002 Mar;21(2):177-80

Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Dental College, 5-11-13 Sugano, Ichikawa-shi, Chiba 272-8513, Japan.

Purpose: Subepithelial amyloidosis of the cornea, or gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy (GDD), is a severe form of corneal stromal amyloidosis predominantly found in the Japanese population. GDD causes severe visual disturbances with irritating symptoms, and keratoplasty is inevitably complicated by early recurrence. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of limbal stem cell transplantation (LSCT) for the treatment of GDD. Read More

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Amniotic membrane surgery.

Curr Opin Ophthalmol 2001 Aug;12(4):269-81

Cornea Service, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA.

Human amniotic membrane (AM) is composed of three layers: a single epithelial layer, a thick basement membrane, and an avascular stroma. Amniotic membrane has anti-adhesive properties and is felt to promote epithelialization and decrease inflammation, neovascularization, and fibrosis. Amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) is currently being used for a continuously widening spectrum of ophthalmic indications. Read More

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