10 results match your criteria siv-associated encephalitis

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Animal models of HIV-associated disease of the central nervous system.

Handb Clin Neurol 2018 ;152:41-53

Department of Biology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA, United States. Electronic address:

It is difficult to study the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) in living patients because central nervous system (CNS) tissues are only available post mortem. Rodent and nonhuman primate (NHP) models of HAND allow for longitudinal analysis of HIV-associated CNS pathology and efficacy studies of novel therapeutics. Rodent models of HAND allow for studies with large sample sizes, short duration, and relatively low cost. Read More

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September 2018

In vivo characterization of macrophage-tropic simian immunodeficiency virus molecular clones in rhesus macaques.

J Neurovirol 2018 08 28;24(4):411-419. Epub 2018 Mar 28.

Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198, USA.

Macrophages are a major target of HIV/SIV infection and play an important role in pathogenesis by serving as viral reservoirs in the central nervous system. Previously, a unique early SIVmac251 envelope (Env) variant, deSIV147 was cloned from blood of a rhesus macaque with rapid disease progression and SIV-associated encephalitis. Here, we show that infectious molecular clone deSIV147 caused systemic infection in rhesus macaques following intravenous or intrarectal exposure. Read More

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Correction for Rife et al., Evolution of Neuroadaptation in the Periphery and Purifying Selection in the Brain Contribute to Compartmentalization of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) in the Brains of Rhesus Macaques with SIV-Associated Encephalitis.

J Virol 2016 10 12;90(19):8947. Epub 2016 Sep 12.

Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.

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October 2016

Evolution of Neuroadaptation in the Periphery and Purifying Selection in the Brain Contribute to Compartmentalization of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) in the Brains of Rhesus Macaques with SIV-Associated Encephalitis.

J Virol 2016 07 10;90(13):6112-6126. Epub 2016 Jun 10.

Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA

Unlabelled: The emergence of a distinct subpopulation of human or simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV/SIV) sequences within the brain (compartmentalization) during infection is hypothesized to be linked to AIDS-related central nervous system (CNS) neuropathology. However, the exact evolutionary mechanism responsible for HIV/SIV brain compartmentalization has not been thoroughly investigated. Using extensive viral sampling from several different peripheral tissues and cell types and from three distinct regions within the brain from two well-characterized rhesus macaque models of the neurological complications of HIV infection (neuroAIDS), we have been able to perform in-depth evolutionary analyses that have been unattainable in HIV-infected subjects. Read More

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Tracking the Emergence of Host-Specific Simian Immunodeficiency Virus env and nef Populations Reveals nef Early Adaptation and Convergent Evolution in Brain of Naturally Progressing Rhesus Macaques.

J Virol 2015 Aug 3;89(16):8484-96. Epub 2015 Jun 3.

Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA

Unlabelled: While a clear understanding of the events leading to successful establishment of host-specific viral populations and productive infection in the central nervous system (CNS) has not yet been reached, the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaque provides a powerful model for the study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intrahost evolution and neuropathogenesis. The evolution of the gp120 and nef genes, which encode two key proteins required for the establishment and maintenance of infection, was assessed in macaques that were intravenously inoculated with the same viral swarm and allowed to naturally progress to simian AIDS and potential SIV-associated encephalitis (SIVE). Longitudinal plasma samples and immune markers were monitored until terminal illness. Read More

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Macaque species susceptibility to simian immunodeficiency virus: increased incidence of SIV central nervous system disease in pigtailed macaques versus rhesus macaques.

J Neurovirol 2015 Apr 12;21(2):148-58. Epub 2015 Feb 12.

Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Immune pressure exerted by MHC class I-restricted cytotoxic T cells drives the development of viral escape mutations, thereby regulating HIV disease progression. Nonetheless, the relationship between host immunity and HIV central nervous system (CNS) disease remains poorly understood. The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) macaque model recapitulates key features of HIV infection including development of AIDS and CNS disease. Read More

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Elevated brain monoamine oxidase activity in SIV- and HIV-associated neurological disease.

J Infect Dis 2014 Sep 31;210(6):904-12. Epub 2014 Mar 31.

Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

We recently demonstrated direct evidence of increased monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity in the brain of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated central nervous system (CNS) disease, consistent with previously reported dopamine deficits in both SIV and HIV infection. In this study, we explored potential mechanisms behind this elevated activity. MAO B messenger RNA was highest in macaques with the most severe SIV-associated CNS lesions and was positively correlated with levels of CD68 and GFAP transcripts in the striatum. Read More

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September 2014

Rhesus macaques infected with macrophage-tropic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmacR71/17E) exhibit extensive focal segmental and global glomerulosclerosis.

J Virol 1998 Nov;72(11):8820-32

Marion Merrell Dow Laboratory of Viral Pathogenesis, Department of Microbiology, Molecular Genetics and Immunology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas 66160, USA.

We previously showed that inoculation of rhesus macaques with molecularly cloned lymphocytetropic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239) results in SIV-associated nephropathy (SIVAN) and that the glomerulosclerotic lesions were associated with the selection of macrophagetropic (M-tropic) variants (V. H. Gattone et al. Read More

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November 1998

Pathogenesis of SIV encephalitis. Selection and replication of neurovirulent SIV.

Am J Pathol 1997 Sep;151(3):793-803

Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA.

To investigate the viral and host factors that contribute to neurological disease, nine macaques were intravenously co-inoculated with SIV/DeltaB670, a primary isolate of SIV consisting of at least 21 different genotypes, and SIV/17E-Fr, a neurovirulent recombinant clone. CD4+ cell counts and antigenemia were measured throughout infection. The SIV env V1 region was amplified from brain and peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA to compare the genotypes present in brain and blood. Read More

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September 1997

Intrathecal synthesis of IgG in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 1994 Jan;10(1):81-9

California Regional Primate Research Center, University of California at Davis 95616.

We examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum from 25 simian immunodeficiency (SIV)-infected rhesus macaques for the presence of SIV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and for intrathecal synthesis of IgG. SIV-specific IgG was present in CSF from almost 50% of the macaques. In approximately half of these animals the SIV-specific IgG appeared to be derived from serum by leakage across a disrupted blood-brain barrier, whereas in the remaining animals there was evidence of intrathecal IgG synthesis. Read More

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January 1994
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