15 results match your criteria protein rp1-d21

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The potential roles of different metacaspases in maize defense response.

Plant Signal Behav 2021 Jun 12;16(6):1906574. Epub 2021 Apr 12.

The Key Laboratory of Plant Development and Environmental Adaptation Biology, Ministry of Education, School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Qingdao, Shandong, PR China.

Metacaspases (MCs), a class of cysteine-dependent proteases, act as important regulators in plant defense response. In maize genome, there are 11 which have been categorized into two types (type I and II) based on their structural differences. In this study, we investigated the different transcript patterns of 11 in maize defense response mediated by the nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich-repeat protein Rp1-D21. Read More

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The maize ZmMIEL1 E3 ligase and ZmMYB83 transcription factor proteins interact and regulate the hypersensitive defence response.

Mol Plant Pathol 2021 Jun 6;22(6):694-709. Epub 2021 Apr 6.

Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, NC State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA.

The plant hypersensitive response (HR), a rapid cell death at the point of pathogenesis, is mediated by nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich repeat (NLR) resistance proteins (R-proteins) that recognize the presence of specific pathogen-derived proteins. Rp1-D21 is an autoactive maize NLR R-protein that triggers HR spontaneously. We previously mapped loci associated with variation in the strength of HR induced by Rp1-D21. Read More

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Maize nicotinate N-methyltransferase interacts with the NLR protein Rp1-D21 and modulates the hypersensitive response.

Mol Plant Pathol 2021 05 6;22(5):564-579. Epub 2021 Mar 6.

The Key Laboratory of Plant Development and Environmental Adaptation Biology, Ministry of Education, School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Qingdao, China.

Most plant intracellular immune receptors belong to nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins. The recognition between NLRs and their corresponding pathogen effectors often triggers a hypersensitive response (HR) at the pathogen infection sites. The nicotinate N-methyltransferase (NANMT) is responsible for the conversion of nicotinate to trigonelline in plants. Read More

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Maize metacaspases modulate the defense response mediated by the NLR protein Rp1-D21 likely by affecting its subcellular localization.

Plant J 2021 01 20;105(1):151-166. Epub 2020 Nov 20.

The Key Laboratory of Plant Development and Environmental Adaptation Biology, Ministry of Education, School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Qingdao, Shandong, 266237, PR China.

Plants usually employ resistance (R) genes to defend against the infection of pathogens, and most R genes encode intracellular nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins. The recognition between R proteins and their cognate pathogens often triggers a rapid localized cell death at the pathogen infection sites, termed the hypersensitive response (HR). Metacaspases (MCs) belong to a cysteine protease family, structurally related to metazoan caspases. Read More

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January 2021

Use of virus-induced gene silencing to characterize genes involved in modulating hypersensitive cell death in maize.

Mol Plant Pathol 2020 12 10;21(12):1662-1676. Epub 2020 Oct 10.

Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, NC State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA.

Plant disease resistance proteins (R-proteins) detect specific pathogen-derived molecules, triggering a defence response often including a rapid localized cell death at the point of pathogen penetration called the hypersensitive response (HR). The maize Rp1-D21 gene encodes a protein that triggers a spontaneous HR causing spots on leaves in the absence of any pathogen. Previously, we used fine mapping and functional analysis in a Nicotiana benthamiana transient expression system to identify and characterize a number of genes associated with variation in Rp1-D21-induced HR. Read More

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December 2020

Maize ZmFNSI Homologs Interact with an NLR Protein to Modulate Hypersensitive Response.

Int J Mol Sci 2020 Apr 5;21(7). Epub 2020 Apr 5.

The Key Laboratory of Plant Development and Environmental Adaptation Biology, Ministry of Education, School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Qingdao 266237, China.

Nucleotide binding, leucine-rich-repeat (NLR) proteins are the major class of resistance (R) proteins used by plants to defend against pathogen infection. The recognition between NLRs and their cognate pathogen effectors usually triggers a rapid localized cell death, termed the hypersensitive response (HR). Flavone synthase I (FNSI) is one of the key enzymes in the flavone biosynthesis pathway. Read More

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A maize polygalacturonase functions as a suppressor of programmed cell death in plants.

BMC Plant Biol 2019 Jul 15;19(1):310. Epub 2019 Jul 15.

Dept. of Entomology and Plant Pathology, NC State University, Raleigh, NC, 27695-7616, USA.

Background: The hypersensitive defense response (HR) in plants is a fast, localized necrotic response around the point of pathogen ingress. HR is usually triggered by a pathogen recognition event mediated by a nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich repeat (NLR) protein. The autoactive maize NLR gene Rp1-D21 confers a spontaneous HR response in the absence of pathogen recognition. Read More

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A maize cytochrome b-c1 complex subunit protein ZmQCR7 controls variation in the hypersensitive response.

Planta 2019 May 29;249(5):1477-1485. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, NC State University, Raleigh, NC, 27695-7616, USA.

Main Conclusion: The gene GRMZM2G318346 which encodes a cytochrome b-c1 complex subunit 7 is associated with variation in strength of the hypersensitive response in maize. We previously identified a QTL at 3,545,354 bp (B73 reference genome V2) on maize chromosome 5 associated with variation in the hypersensitive response (HR) conferred by the autoactive R-gene Rp1-D21 (Olukolu et al. in PLoS Genet 10:e1004562 2014). Read More

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Maize Homologs of CCoAOMT and HCT, Two Key Enzymes in Lignin Biosynthesis, Form Complexes with the NLR Rp1 Protein to Modulate the Defense Response.

Plant Physiol 2016 07 10;171(3):2166-77. Epub 2016 May 10.

Department of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (G.-F.W., P.J.B.-K.)Key Laboratory of Plant Cell Engineering and Germplasm Innovation, Ministry of Education, School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100, P.R. China (G.-F.W.); U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Plant Science Research Unit, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (P.J.B.-K.).

Disease resistance (R) genes encode nucleotide binding Leu-rich-repeat (NLR) proteins that confer resistance to specific pathogens. Upon pathogen recognition they trigger a defense response that usually includes a so-called hypersensitive response (HR), a rapid localized cell death at the site of pathogen infection. Intragenic recombination between two maize (Zea mays) NLRs, Rp1-D and Rp1-dp2, resulted in the formation of a hybrid NLR, Rp1-D21, which confers an autoactive HR in the absence of pathogen infection. Read More

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Maize Homologs of Hydroxycinnamoyltransferase, a Key Enzyme in Lignin Biosynthesis, Bind the Nucleotide Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Rp1 Proteins to Modulate the Defense Response.

Plant Physiol 2015 Nov 15;169(3):2230-43. Epub 2015 Sep 15.

Departments of Plant Pathology (G.-F.W., Y.H., B.A.O., P.J.B.-K.),Plant and Microbial Biology (R.S., X.L.), andBiological Sciences (D.N.), North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695;Plants for Human Health Institute, North Carolina State University, Kannapolis, North Carolina 28081 (R.S., X.L.); andPlant Science Research Unit, United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (P.J.B.-K.)

In plants, most disease resistance genes encode nucleotide binding Leu-rich repeat (NLR) proteins that trigger a rapid localized cell death called a hypersensitive response (HR) upon pathogen recognition. The maize (Zea mays) NLR protein Rp1-D21 derives from an intragenic recombination between two NLRs, Rp1-D and Rp1-dp2, and confers an autoactive HR in the absence of pathogen infection. From a previous quantitative trait loci and genome-wide association study, we identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism locus highly associated with variation in the severity of Rp1-D21-induced HR. Read More

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November 2015

Cytoplasmic and Nuclear Localizations Are Important for the Hypersensitive Response Conferred by Maize Autoactive Rp1-D21 Protein.

Mol Plant Microbe Interact 2015 Sep 25;28(9):1023-31. Epub 2015 Aug 25.

1 Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, U.S.A.;

Disease resistance (R) genes have been isolated from many plant species. Most encode nucleotide binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins that trigger a rapid localized programmed cell death called the hypersensitive response (HR) upon pathogen recognition. Despite their structural similarities, different NLR are distributed in a range of subcellular locations, and analogous domains play diverse functional roles. Read More

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September 2015

Molecular and functional analyses of a maize autoactive NB-LRR protein identify precise structural requirements for activity.

PLoS Pathog 2015 Feb 26;11(2):e1004674. Epub 2015 Feb 26.

Department of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, United States of America; USDA-ARS Plant Science Research Unit, Raleigh, North Carolina, United States of America.

Plant disease resistance is often mediated by nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (NLR) proteins which remain auto-inhibited until recognition of specific pathogen-derived molecules causes their activation, triggering a rapid, localized cell death called a hypersensitive response (HR). Three domains are recognized in one of the major classes of NLR proteins: a coiled-coil (CC), a nucleotide binding (NB-ARC) and a leucine rich repeat (LRR) domains. The maize NLR gene Rp1-D21 derives from an intergenic recombination event between two NLR genes, Rp1-D and Rp1-dp2 and confers an autoactive HR. Read More

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February 2015

A genome-wide association study of the maize hypersensitive defense response identifies genes that cluster in related pathways.

PLoS Genet 2014 Aug 28;10(8):e1004562. Epub 2014 Aug 28.

Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, Lilly Hall, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States of America.

Much remains unknown of molecular events controlling the plant hypersensitive defense response (HR), a rapid localized cell death that limits pathogen spread and is mediated by resistance (R-) genes. Genetic control of the HR is hard to quantify due to its microscopic and rapid nature. Natural modifiers of the ectopic HR phenotype induced by an aberrant auto-active R-gene (Rp1-D21), were mapped in a population of 3,381 recombinant inbred lines from the maize nested association mapping population. Read More

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Characterization of temperature and light effects on the defense response phenotypes associated with the maize Rp1-D21 autoactive resistance gene.

BMC Plant Biol 2013 Jul 26;13:106. Epub 2013 Jul 26.

Department of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA.

Background: Rp1 is a complex locus of maize, which carries a set of genes controlling race-specific resistance to the common rust fungus, Puccinia sorghi. The resistance response includes the "Hypersensitive response" (HR), a rapid response triggered by a pathogen recognition event that includes localized cell death at the point of pathogen penetration and the induction of pathogenesis associated genes. The Rp1-D21gene is an autoactive allelic variant at the Rp1 locus, causing spontaneous activation of the HR response, in the absence of pathogenesis. Read More

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Use of Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization (MAGIC) to identify novel genetic loci that modify the maize hypersensitive response.

Theor Appl Genet 2011 Oct 27;123(6):985-97. Epub 2011 Jul 27.

Department of Agronomy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA.

The partially dominant, autoactive maize disease resistance gene Rp1-D21 causes hypersensitive response (HR) lesions to form spontaneously on leaves and stems in the absence of pathogen recognition. The maize nested association mapping (NAM) population consists of 25 200-line subpopulations each derived from a cross between the maize line B73 and one of 25 diverse inbred lines. By crossing a line carrying the Rp1-D21 gene with lines from three of these subpopulations and assessing the F(1) progeny, we were able to map several novel loci that modify the maize HR, using both single-population quantitative trait locus (QTL) and joint analysis of all three populations. Read More

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October 2011
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