8 results match your criteria periphery purifying

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Gene co-expression network connectivity is an important determinant of selective constraint.

PLoS Genet 2017 04 13;13(4):e1006402. Epub 2017 Apr 13.

Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.

While several studies have investigated general properties of the genetic architecture of natural variation in gene expression, few of these have considered natural, outbreeding populations. In parallel, systems biology has established that a general feature of biological networks is that they are scale-free, rendering them buffered against random mutations. To date, few studies have attempted to examine the relationship between the selective processes acting to maintain natural variation of gene expression and the associated co-expression network structure. Read More

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Correction for Rife et al., Evolution of Neuroadaptation in the Periphery and Purifying Selection in the Brain Contribute to Compartmentalization of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) in the Brains of Rhesus Macaques with SIV-Associated Encephalitis.

J Virol 2016 10 12;90(19):8947. Epub 2016 Sep 12.

Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.

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October 2016

Evolution of Neuroadaptation in the Periphery and Purifying Selection in the Brain Contribute to Compartmentalization of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) in the Brains of Rhesus Macaques with SIV-Associated Encephalitis.

J Virol 2016 07 10;90(13):6112-6126. Epub 2016 Jun 10.

Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA

Unlabelled: The emergence of a distinct subpopulation of human or simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV/SIV) sequences within the brain (compartmentalization) during infection is hypothesized to be linked to AIDS-related central nervous system (CNS) neuropathology. However, the exact evolutionary mechanism responsible for HIV/SIV brain compartmentalization has not been thoroughly investigated. Using extensive viral sampling from several different peripheral tissues and cell types and from three distinct regions within the brain from two well-characterized rhesus macaque models of the neurological complications of HIV infection (neuroAIDS), we have been able to perform in-depth evolutionary analyses that have been unattainable in HIV-infected subjects. Read More

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Molecular evolution of the three short PGRPs of the malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles arabiensis in East Africa.

BMC Evol Biol 2010 Jan 12;10. Epub 2010 Jan 12.

Centro de Malária e outras Doenças Tropicais, UEI Malária, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Rua da Junqueira, 96, 1349-008 Lisbon, Portugal.

Background: Immune responses to parasites, which start with pathogen recognition, play a decisive role in the control of the infection in mosquitoes. Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) are an important family of pattern recognition receptors that are involved in the activation of these immune reactions. Pathogen pressure can exert adaptive changes in host genes that are crucial components of the vector's defence. Read More

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January 2010

Phylogenetic network and physicochemical properties of nonsynonymous mutations in the protein-coding genes of human mitochondrial DNA.

Mol Biol Evol 2003 Aug 30;20(8):1195-210. Epub 2003 May 30.

Biocenter and Department of Neurology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.

Theories on molecular evolution predict that phylogenetically recent nonsynonymous mutations should contain more non-neutral amino acid replacements than ancient mutations. We analyzed 840 complete coding-region human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences for nonsynonymous mutations and evaluated the mutations in terms of the physicochemical properties of the amino acids involved. We identified 465 distinct missense and 6 nonsense mutations. Read More

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The Nod factor-elicited annexin MtAnn1 is preferentially localised at the nuclear periphery in symbiotically activated root tissues of Medicago truncatula.

Plant J 2002 Nov;32(3):343-52

Laboratoire de Biologie Moléculaire des Relations Plantes-Microorganismes, INRA-CNRS UMR 215, BP 27, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan Cedex, France.

The Medicago truncatula MtAnn1 gene, encoding a putative annexin, is transcriptionally activated in root tissues in response to rhizobial Nod factors. To gain further insight into MtAnn1 function during the early stages of nodulation, we have examined in detail both spatio-temporal gene expression patterns and MtAnn1 activity and localisation in root tissues. Analysis of transgenic Medicago plants expressing a pMtAnn1-GUS fusion has revealed a novel pattern of transcription in both outer and inner cell layers of the root following either Nod factor-treatment or rhizobial inoculation. Read More

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November 2002

Identification of the melatonin-binding site MT3 as the quinone reductase 2.

J Biol Chem 2000 Oct;275(40):31311-7

Pharmacologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, Institut de Recherches Servier, 78290 Croissy-sur-Seine, France.

The regulation of the circadian rhythm is relayed from the central nervous system to the periphery by melatonin, a hormone synthesized at night in the pineal gland. Besides two melatonin G-coupled receptors, mt(1) and MT(2), the existence of a novel putative melatonin receptor, MT(3), was hypothesized from the observation of a binding site in both central and peripheral hamster tissues with an original binding profile and a very rapid kinetics of ligand exchange compared with mt(1) and MT(2). In this report, we present the purification of MT(3) from Syrian hamster kidney and its identification as the hamster homologue of the human quinone reductase 2 (QR(2), EC ). Read More

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October 2000

The hagfish slime gland thread cell. I. A unique cellular system for the study of intermediate filaments and intermediate filament-microtubule interactions.

J Cell Biol 1984 Feb;98(2):653-69

Thread cell differentiation in the slime gland of the Pacific hagfish Eptatretus stouti has been studied using light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Thread cell differentiation is remarkable in that the life history of the cell is largely dedicated to the production of a single, tapered, cylindrical, highly coiled, and precisely packaged cytoplasmic thread that may attain lengths of 60 cm and diameters approaching 1.5 micron. Read More

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February 1984
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