5 results match your criteria palm-prrp31 palm-prrp31

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Palmitoylation of Prolactin-Releasing Peptide Increased Affinity for and Activation of the GPR10, NPFF-R2 and NPFF-R1 Receptors: In Vitro Study.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Aug 18;22(16). Epub 2021 Aug 18.

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences, 16610 Prague, Czech Republic.

The anorexigenic neuropeptide prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP) is involved in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure. Lipidization of PrRP stabilizes the peptide, facilitates central effect after peripheral administration and increases its affinity for its receptor, GPR10, and for the neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptor NPFF-R2. The two most potent palmitoylated analogs with anorectic effects in mice, palm-PrRP31 and palm-PrRP31, were studied in vitro to determine their agonist/antagonist properties and mechanism of action on GPR10, NPFF-R2 and other potential off-target receptors related to energy homeostasis. Read More

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Cholecystokinin system is involved in the anorexigenic effect of peripherally applied palmitoylated prolactin-releasing peptide in fasted mice.

Physiol Res 2021 08 1;70(4):579-590. Epub 2021 Jun 1.

Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic,

Prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP) has been proposed to mediate the central satiating effects of cholecystokinin (CCK) through the vagal CCK1 receptor. PrRP acts as an endogenous ligand of G protein-coupled receptor 10 (GPR10), which is expressed at the highest levels in brain areas related to food intake regulation, e.g. Read More

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Effect of palmitoylated prolactin-releasing peptide on food intake and neural activation after different routes of peripheral administration in rats.

Peptides 2016 Jan 28;75:109-17. Epub 2015 Nov 28.

Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Czech Republic; Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. Electronic address:

Obesity is an escalating epidemic, but an effective non-invasive therapy is still scarce. For obesity treatment, anorexigenic neuropeptides are promising tools, but their delivery from the periphery to the brain is complicated by their peptide character. In order to overcome this unfavorable fact, we have applied the lipidization of neuropeptide prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP), whose strong anorexigenic effect was demonstrated. Read More

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January 2016

Peripheral administration of palmitoylated prolactin-releasing peptide induces Fos expression in hypothalamic neurons involved in energy homeostasis in NMRI male mice.

Brain Res 2015 Nov 8;1625:151-8. Epub 2015 Sep 8.

Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, AS CR, Prague, Czech Republic. Electronic address:

Energy homeostasis is the result of a balance between energy intake and expenditure, and the hypothalamus plays a key role in the regulation of these processes. The hypothalamic prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP) is involved in food intake regulation and energy homeostasis, although only its lipidized analogs exert central anorexigenic effects after peripheral administration. The aim of the present study was to delineate the extent of the Fos expression as a marker of neuronal activation within the hypothalamic structures involved in food intake regulation after peripherally administered palmitoylated PrRP31 (palm-PrRP31) and to determine whether the anorexigenic effect of peripherally administered palm-PrRP31 influence the activity of hypocretin (HCRT) and oxytocin (OXY) neurons, i. Read More

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November 2015

Anorexigenic lipopeptides ameliorate central insulin signaling and attenuate tau phosphorylation in hippocampi of mice with monosodium glutamate-induced obesity.

J Alzheimers Dis 2015 ;45(3):823-35

Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, AS CR, Prague, Czech Republic.

Numerous epidemiological and experimental studies have demonstrated that patients who suffer from metabolic disorders, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or obesity, have higher risks of cognitive dysfunction and of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Impaired insulin signaling in the brain could contribute to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, which contain an abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau protein. This study aimed to determine whether potential tau hyperphosphorylation could be detected in an obesity-induced pre-diabetes state and whether anorexigenic agents could affect this state. Read More

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January 2016
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