18 results match your criteria pakistani venom

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Antihyaluronidase and Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP) Activities of Medicinal Plants to Combat Venom-Induced Toxicities.

Biomed Res Int 2021 16;2021:6618349. Epub 2021 Mar 16.

Department of Pharmacy, COMSATS University Islamabad, Abbottabad Campus, 22060 KPK, Pakistan.

Snakebite is one of the most neglected diseases of developing countries. Deaths due to snakebite envenoming are quite high in Pakistan, and many deaths are caused by envenomation. Traditional use of medicinal plants against snakebites is a common practice in Pakistan due to countless benefits. Read More

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Anti-5'-Nucleotidases (5'-ND) and Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) Activities of Medicinal Plants to Combat Venom-Induced Toxicities.

Biomed Res Int 2021 4;2021:6631042. Epub 2021 Feb 4.

Department of Pharmacy, COMSATS University Islamabad, Abbottabad Campus 22060, KPK, Pakistan.

is one of the highly venomous snakes of Pakistan that is responsible for numerous cases of envenomation and deaths. In Pakistan, medicinal plants are commonly used traditionally for snakebite treatment because of their low cost and easy availability in comparison with antivenom. The current research is aimed at evaluating the inhibitory activity of Pakistani medicinal plants against acetylcholinesterase and 5'-nucleotidases present in venom. Read More

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Reply to Comments on Proteomic Investigations of Two Pakistani Snake Venom Species Unravel the Venom Complexity, Posttranslational Modifications, and Presence of Extracellular Vesicles. 2020, , 669.

Toxins (Basel) 2020 12 8;12(12). Epub 2020 Dec 8.

Laboratory for Structural Biology of Infection and Inflammation, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, University of Hamburg, Building 22a, Notkestr.85, 22603 Hamburg, Germany.

We appreciate the commentary on our article, and we would like to take the opportunity to address several points raised in the reviewers' commentary [... Read More

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December 2020

Comments on Proteomic Investigations of Two Pakistani Snake Venoms Species Unravel the Venom Complexity, Posttranslational Modifications, and Presence of Extracellular Vesicles. 2020, , 669.

Toxins (Basel) 2020 12 8;12(12). Epub 2020 Dec 8.

Clinical Toxicology Research Group, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia.

We read with interest the article by Manuwar et al [... Read More

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December 2020

Proteomic Investigations of Two Pakistani Snake Venoms Species Unravel the Venom Complexity, Posttranslational Modifications, and Presence of Extracellular Vesicles.

Toxins (Basel) 2020 10 22;12(11). Epub 2020 Oct 22.

Laboratory for Structural Biology of Infection and Inflammation, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Build. 22a, Notkestr. 85, University of Hamburg, 22603 Hamburg, Germany.

Latest advancement of omics technologies allows in-depth characterization of venom compositions. In the present work we present a proteomic study of two snake venoms of the genus i.e. Read More

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October 2020

Functional venomics of the Big-4 snakes of Pakistan.

Toxicon 2020 May 12;179:60-71. Epub 2020 Mar 12.

H.E.J. Research Institute of Chemistry, International Center for Chemical and Biological Sciences (ICCBS), University of Karachi, Karachi, 75270, Pakistan. Electronic address:

In South Asia, the "Big-4" venomous snakes Naja naja, Bungarus caeruleus, Daboia russelii, and Echis carinatus are so-called because they are the most medically important snakes in the region. Antivenom is the only effective treatment option for snakebite envenoming but antivenom is not produced domestically in Pakistan making the country reliant on polyvalent products imported from India and Saudi Arabia. The present study investigated the toxin composition and activity of the venoms of Pakistani specimens by means of proteomic and physio/pharmacological experiments. Read More

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Evaluation of different Pakistani medicinal plants for inhibitory potential against Echis carinatus induced Phospholipase A2 toxicity.

Pak J Pharm Sci 2019 Sep;32(5(Supplementary)):2269-2277

Department of Pharmacy, COMSATS University, Abbottabad Campus, Islamabad, Pakistan.

Medicinal plants of Pakistan are known for their curative properties against snake bite as rural people have been using natural herbs for such injuries for hundreds to thousands of years. People of rural areas of Pakistan are prone to snakebite, and on the whole death due to snakebite has been increasing worldwide. The objective of this study was to test the neutralizing potential of 17 Pakistani medicinal plant extracts against phospholipase A2 activity in Echis carinatus venom. Read More

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September 2019

Venom proteome of Bungarus sindanus (Sind krait) from Pakistan and in vivo cross-neutralization of toxicity using an Indian polyvalent antivenom.

J Proteomics 2019 02 29;193:243-254. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Department of Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Electronic address:

The proteome of the Pakistani B. sindanus venom was investigated with reverse-phase HPLC and nano-ESI-LCMS/MS analysis. At least 36 distinct proteins belonging to 8 toxin protein families were identified. Read More

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February 2019

Systemic vascular leakage induced in mice by Russell's viper venom from Pakistan.

Sci Rep 2018 10 31;8(1):16088. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

School of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 22959, USA.

Envenomings by some populations of the Russell's viper (Daboia russelii) are characterized by a systemic capillary leak syndrome (CLS) which causes hemoconcentration, and is associated with the severity of envenoming. We adapted a model of CLS in mice by assessing hemoconcentration. The venom of D. Read More

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October 2018

Proteomics, functional characterization and antivenom neutralization of the venom of Pakistani Russell's viper (Daboia russelii) from the wild.

J Proteomics 2018 07 3;183:1-13. Epub 2018 May 3.

Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Electronic address:

The venom proteome of wild Pakistani Russell's viper (Daboia russelii) was investigated through nano-ESI-LCMS/MS of the reverse-phase HPLC fractions. A total of 54 venom proteins were identified and clustered into 11 protein families. Phospholipase A (PLA, 63. Read More

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Elucidating the biogeographical variation of the venom of Naja naja (spectacled cobra) from Pakistan through a venom-decomplexing proteomic study.

J Proteomics 2018 03 24;175:156-173. Epub 2017 Dec 24.

Department of Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Naja naja is a medically important species that is distributed widely in South Asia. Its venom lethality and neutralization profile have been reported to vary markedly, but the understanding of this phenomenon has been limited without a comprehensive venom profile for the Pakistani N. naja. Read More

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Venomics of Bungarus caeruleus (Indian krait): Comparable venom profiles, variable immunoreactivities among specimens from Sri Lanka, India and Pakistan.

J Proteomics 2017 07 2;164:1-18. Epub 2017 May 2.

Department of Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

The Indian krait (Bungarus caeruleus) is one of the "Big Four" venomous snakes widely distributed in South Asia. The present venomic study reveals that its venom (Sri Lankan origin) is predominated by phospholipases A (64.5% of total proteins), in which at least 4. Read More

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Venom and Purified Toxins of the Spectacled Cobra (Naja naja) from Pakistan: Insights into Toxicity and Antivenom Neutralization.

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2016 06 28;94(6):1392-9. Epub 2016 Mar 28.

Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Department of Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Geographical variations of snake venoms can result in suboptimal effectiveness of Indian antivenoms that are currently used in most South Asian countries. This study investigated the toxicity and neutralization profile of the venom and toxins from Pakistani spectacled cobra, Naja naja, using VINS polyvalent antivenom (VPAV, India), Naja kaouthia monovalent antivenom (NKMAV, Thailand), and neuro bivalent antivenom (NBAV, Taiwan). Cation-exchange and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography fractionations followed by toxin identification through liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (MS)/MS indicated that the venom comprised mainly of postsynaptic neurotoxins (NTXs) (long neurotoxins [LNTXs], 28. Read More

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Paederus beetles: the agent of human dermatitis.

J Venom Anim Toxins Incl Trop Dis 2015 25;21. Epub 2015 Feb 25.

Department of Statistics, Government College University, Faisalabad, Pakistan.

Background: Rove beetles of the genus Paederus cause dermatitis when they come in contact with human skin. This condition is prevalent in some tropical and subtropical regions, such as in northern Pakistan, where it was recorded for the first time by US troops. Despite much research from other countries on this subject, few studies, mostly clinical, have been performed in a Pakistani context. Read More

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Comparative cost and efficacy trial of Pakistani versus Indian anti snake venom.

J Pak Med Assoc 2013 Sep;63(9):1129-32

Civil Hospital Umar Kot, Sindh.

Objectives: To compare the efficacy, safety and cost of Pakistani anti-snake venom with that imported from India

Methods: The comparative cross-sectional study was conducted from June to September 2010 and comprised patients hospitalised following Krait snake bite in Mithi and Umerkot hospitals of Tharparker district who had incoagulable blood test on admission (20-minute whole blood clotting time). Basic demographies of patients, the site of bite and swelling around the bite and joints were entered in a proforma. For blinding, the liquid anti-snake venoms were packed in opaque polythene bags and marked as "A" and "B", and refrigerated. Read More

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September 2013

Combating of scorpion bite with Pakistani medicinal plants having ethno-botanical evidences as antidote.

Acta Pol Pharm 2013 May-Jun;70(3):387-94

Department of Pharmacy, COMSATS Institute of Information and Technology, Abbottabad 22060, Pakistan.

Although the majority of serious cases in the world are concerned with snake bite envenomation, but those which are caused by scorpion stings are also famous for causing extreme pain. The present view is an attempt to enlist scientifically ignored medicinal plants of Pakistan exhibiting anti-scorpion venom activity. In this review data of 35 medicinal plants is collected with their families, parts used, distribution in Pakistan, and major constituents present in plant. Read More

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Venom proteomic characterization and relative antivenom neutralization of two medically important Pakistani elapid snakes (Bungarus sindanus and Naja naja).

J Proteomics 2013 Aug 25;89:15-23. Epub 2013 May 25.

Venom Evolution Lab, School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia.

Unlabelled: Intra- and interspecific variation in venom composition has been shown to have a major effect upon the efficacy of antivenoms. Due to the absence of domestically produced antivenoms, Pakistan is wholly reliant upon antivenoms produced in other countries, such as India. However, the efficacy of these antivenoms in neutralising the venoms of Pakistani snakes has not been ascertained. Read More

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Self-association and active enzyme forms of Naja naja naja and Crotalus atrox phospholipase A2 studied by analytical ultracentrifugation.

Biochemistry 1986 Dec;25(24):8024-33

The dimerization of phospholipase A2 (PLPA2) from Naja naja naja (Pakistani cobra) and Crotalus atrox (Western Diamondback rattlesnake) has been studied from pH 2.5 to 11 at 20 degrees C in 1 mM CaCl2, 0.21 M ionic strength. Read More

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December 1986
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