19 results match your criteria opinion subgenus

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SARS-CoV-2, the pandemic coronavirus: Molecular and structural insights.

J Basic Microbiol 2021 Mar 18;61(3):180-202. Epub 2021 Jan 18.

Department of Botany, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune, India.

The outbreak of a novel coronavirus associated with acute respiratory disease, called COVID-19, marked the introduction of the third spillover of an animal coronavirus (CoV) to humans in the last two decades. The genome analysis with various bioinformatics tools revealed that the causative pathogen (SARS-CoV-2) belongs to the subgenus Sarbecovirus of the genus Betacoronavirus, with highly similar genome as bat coronavirus and receptor-binding domain (RBD) of spike glycoprotein as Malayan pangolin coronavirus. Based on its genetic proximity, SARS-CoV-2 is likely to have originated from bat-derived CoV and transmitted to humans via an unknown intermediate mammalian host, probably Malayan pangolin. Read More

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Causes of Fatal Cyathostomiasis in Brown Booby (Sula leucogaster) from Brazil: Identification of Pathogen and Implications for Management.

J Parasitol 2020 06;106(3):400-405

BW Veterinary Consulting, Rua Sueli Brazil Flores number 88, Praia Seca, Araruama, Rio de Janeiro State, CEP 28970-000, Brazil.

Fatal infection by Cyathostoma (Cyathostoma) phenisci (Nematoda: Syngamidae), was identified in 2 of 52 brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) collected on beaches in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and admitted to the veterinary clinic for rehabilitation. Both infected birds were in poor physical condition, with atrophied pectoral muscles, and died soon after starting treatment. The parasitological and pathological examination of the carcasses revealed the presence of C. Read More

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The subgenus names Moraxella and Branhamella (in the genus Moraxella) are not in accordance with the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria and are therefore not validly published: Supplementary information to Opinion 83. Judicial Commission of the International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes.

Authors:
B J Tindall

Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2014 Oct;64(Pt 10):3595-3596

Leibniz Institute-DSMZ Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH., Inhoffenstrasse 7b, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.

The publication of Opinion 83, which dealt with the valid publication of the subgenus names Moraxella and Branhamella (in the genus Moraxella), has highlighted a problem relating to the absence of descriptions associated with these names at the time they were effectively published. This calls into question whether the ruling outlined in Opinion 83, that these names should have qualified for inclusion on the Approved Lists of Bacterial Names, and their inclusion on Validation List 15 are not in accordance with Rule 27 of the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria governing the valid publication of a name. The subgenus names Moraxella and Branhamella (in the genus Moraxella) are not to be considered to be included on the Approved Lists of Bacterial Names, nor are they to be considered to be validly published by inclusion on Validation List 15. Read More

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October 2014

Body weight as a determinant of clinical evolution in hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) infected with Leishmania (Viannia) panamensis.

Rev Inst Med Trop Sao Paulo 2013 Sep-Oct;55(5):357-61

The clinical outcome of infection with Leishmania species of the subgenus Viannia in hamster model (Mesocricetus auratus) has shown to be different depending on experimental protocol. Body weight has been a relevant determinant of the clinical outcome of the infection in hamsters with visceral leishmaniasis but its importance as a clinical parameter in hamsters with cutaneous leishmaniasis is not known. In this study, the clinical evolution of infection with L. Read More

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January 2014

Latitudinal patterns in the diversity of two subgenera of the genus Daphnia O.F. Müller (Crustacea: Cladocera: Daphniidae).

Zootaxa 2013 Nov 12;3736:159-74. Epub 2013 Nov 12.

A. N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Leninsky Prospect 33, Moscow 119071, Russia; Email:

Daphnia O.F. Müller (Crustacea: Cladocera: Daphniidae) is an important model in biology. Read More

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November 2013

[Numerical taxonamy of Paris plants].

Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi 2010 Jun;35(12):1518-20

School of Chinese Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin 300193, China.

Numerical taxonomic studies were carried out in order to elucidate the taxonomic relationship among 17 species belonging to Paris. Eighteen characters including 10 morphological, 4 pollen morphological, 2 cytotalonomical and 2 habitat characters were used for the analysis. On basis of UPGMA clustering analysis, two subgenus and seven groups were recognized. Read More

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Challenging Opinion 83.

Authors:
B J Tindall

Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2008 Jul;58(Pt 7):1772-4

DSMZ - Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH, Inhoffenstrasse 7B, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.

The Judicial Commission has ruled that subgenus names within the genus Moraxella should be considered to have been included on the Approved Lists, together with the corresponding species names within these subgenera. Closer examination of the facts, including the wording of the relevant passages in the Code and the original publication in which these names are included, together with information that has subsequently come to light, indicates that there is good cause to re-examine the facts on which this Opinion is based. Read More

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The subgenus names Moraxella subgen. Moraxella and Moraxella subgen. Branhamella and the species names included within these taxa should have been included on the Approved Lists of Bacterial Names and a ruling on the proposal to make changes to Rule 34a. Opinion 83.

Authors:

Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2008 Jul;58(Pt 7):1766-7

The Judicial Commission of the International Committee for Systematics of Prokaryotes rules that the following names should have been included on the Approved Lists of Bacterial Names, Moraxella (subgen. Branhamella Bøvre 1979), Moraxella (subgen. Moraxella Lwoff 1939), Moraxella (subgen. Read More

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Phylogenetic reconstruction using secondary structures of Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS2, rDNA): finding the molecular and morphological gap in Caribbean gorgonian corals.

BMC Evol Biol 2007 Jun 11;7:90. Epub 2007 Jun 11.

Departamento de Ciencias Biológicas-Facultad de Ciencias, Laboratorio Biología Molecular Marina (BIOMMAR), Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.

Background: Most phylogenetic studies using current methods have focused on primary DNA sequence information. However, RNA secondary structures are particularly useful in systematics because they include characteristics, not found in the primary sequence, that give "morphological" information. Despite the number of recent molecular studies on octocorals, there is no consensus opinion about a region that carries enough phylogenetic resolution to solve intrageneric or close species relationships. Read More

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Wild Allium species (Alliaceae) used in folk medicine of Tajikistan and Uzbekistan.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2006 Apr 3;2:18. Epub 2006 Apr 3.

Philipps-Universität Marburg, Institut für Pharmazeutische Chemie, Marbacher Weg 6, D-35032, Marburg.

Background: Hitherto available sources from literature mentioned several wild growing Allium species as "edible" or "medicinally used" but without any further specification.

Methods: New data were gained during recent research missions: Allium plants were collected and shown to the local population which was asked for names and usage of these plants.

Results: Information was collected about current medical applications of sixteen wild species, nine of which belong to different sections of Allium subgenus Melanocrommyum. Read More

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The genus and subgenus categories within Culicidae and placement of Ochlerotatus as a subgenus of Aedes.

J Am Mosq Control Assoc 2004 Jun;20(2):208-14

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, PO Box 2087, Ft. Collins, CO 80522, USA.

Many species of Culicidae are of major medical, veterinary, and economic importance. To facilitate discussion among taxonomists, medical entomologists, ecologists, and vector control specialists, it is essential that culicidologists be able to readily recognize individual genera. Adult female mosquitoes, the stage most often encountered in surveys, should be identifiable to genus without dissection with the aid of a good-quality dissecting microscope. Read More

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Nomenclature of the subgenera Moraxella and Branhamella and of the nine species included in these subgenera and proposal to modify rule 34a of the Bacteriological Code (1990 Revision). Request for an opinion.

Authors:
J P Euzéby

Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2001 Sep;51(Pt 5):1939-1941

The subgenera Moraxella and Branhamella and the nine species included in these subgenera were inadvertently omitted from the Approved Lists of Bacterial Names and have never been revived according to Rule 28a of the Bacteriological Code (1990 Revision). The author requests that these names be revived and considered to be validly published in the 'Index of the bacterial and yeast nomenclatural changes published in the International Journal of Systematic Bacteriology since the 1980 Approved Lists of Bacterial Names (1 January 1980 to 1 January 1985)', which appears in the July 1985 issue of the International Journal of Systematic Bacteriology. Another problem is the status of the species included in the subgenera Moraxella and Branhamella because the Bacteriological Code (1990 Revision) does not envisage the status of a species transferred into a subgenus. Read More

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September 2001

Chinese phlebotomine sandflies of subgenus Adlerius nitzulescu, 1931 (Diptera: Psychodidae) and the identity of Phlebotomus sichuanensis Leng & Yin, 1983. Part I--Taxonomical study and geographical distribution.

Authors:
Y J Leng L M Zhang

Parasite 2001 Mar;8(1):3-9

Department of Medical Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Jinan University Guangzhou, 510632 China.

Four species of Adlerius phlebotomine sandflies have been recorded in China, namely: P. chinensis Newstead, 1916 (Pc), P. fengi Leng & Zhang, 1994; P. Read More

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Evidence for a high ancestral GC content in Drosophila.

Mol Biol Evol 2000 Nov;17(11):1710-7

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2525, USA.

Study of the nucleotide composition in Drosophila, focusing on the saltans and willistoni groups, has revealed unanticipated differences in nucleotide composition among lineages. Compositional differences are associated with an accelerated rate of nucleotide substitution in functionally less constrained regions. These observations have been set forth against the extended opinion that the pattern of point mutation has remained constant during the evolution of the genus. Read More

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November 2000

[Taxonomy and geographic distribution of Phlebotomus (Adlerius) chinensis s. l. and P. (Larroussius) major s. l. (Psychodidae-Diptera). Status of species present in Greece].

Authors:
N Léger B Pesson

Bull Soc Pathol Exot Filiales 1987 ;80(2):252-60

Vectors of leishmaniasis have to be identified with precision. Some subspecies of the subgenus Adlerius and Larroussius have been recently raised to the specific level. Paleobiogeography justifies this opinion. Read More

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September 1987

[Culicoides (Avaritia) sanguisuga, a new species of biting midges for the fauna of the USSR].

Authors:
R M Gornostaeva

Parazitologiia 1977 Nov-Dec;11(6):493-8

The occurrence in the USSR of C. (A.) sanguisuga Coq. Read More

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February 1978

PALEOGENESIS AND PALEO-EPIDEMIOLOGY OF PRIMATE MALARIA.

Authors:
L J BRUCE-CHWATT

Bull World Health Organ 1965 ;32:363-87

The Haemosporidia, which comprise the malaria parasites, have probably evolved from Coccidia of the intestinal epithelium of the vertebrate host by adaptation first to some tissues of the internal organs and then to life in the circulating cells of the blood.The present opinion is that, among the malaria parasites of primates, the genus Hepatocystis and the "quartan group" of plasmodia are the most ancestral, followed by the "tertian group"; from the evolutionary viewpoint the subgenus Laverania is probably the most recent.Studies recently completed and research in hand on malaria parasites of apes and monkeys, combined with the possibility of assessing the infectivity of new simian parasites to Anopheles and to man, will be of great importance for a better understanding of the probable evolution of primate malarias. Read More

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December 1996
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