11 results match your criteria mydas ogasawara

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Detection and molecular characteristics of Pyelosomum cochlear (Digenea: Pronocephalidae) in the urinary bladder of the green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) in the Northwest Pacific Ocean.

Infect Genet Evol 2021 Jun 8;93:104962. Epub 2021 Jun 8.

Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology, Faculty of Agriculture, Iwate University, 3-18-8 Ueda, Morioka 020-8550, Japan. Electronic address:

The genus Pyelosomum consists of parasitic flukes occurring primarily in marine turtles; Pyelosomum cochlear Looss 1899 is the only species of this genus that parasitizes the urinary bladder. In this study, we detected flukes in the urinary bladders of 20 of 88 green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) harvested in the Ogasawara Islands, in the Northwest Pacific Ocean. We identified the flukes as P. Read More

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Similar circling movements observed across marine megafauna taxa.

iScience 2021 Apr 18;24(4):102221. Epub 2021 Mar 18.

Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8564, Japan.

Advances in biologging technology have enabled 3D dead-reckoning reconstruction of marine animal movements at spatiotemporal scales of meters and seconds. Examining high-resolution 3D movements of sharks (, N = 4; , N = 1), sea turtles (, N = 3), penguins (, N = 6), and marine mammals (, N = 4; , N = 1), we report the discovery of circling events where animals consecutively circled more than twice at relatively constant angular speeds. Similar circling behaviors were observed across a wide variety of marine megafauna, suggesting these behaviors might serve several similar purposes across taxa including foraging, social interactions, and navigation. Read More

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Detection and molecular characteristics of Rhytidodoides sp. (Digenea: Rhytidodidae) from the gall bladder of green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) in the Ogasawara Islands, Japan.

Parasitol Int 2021 Aug 7;83:102377. Epub 2021 May 7.

Laboratory of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary medicine, Okayama University of Science, 1-3 Ikoinooka, Imabari 794-8555, Japan.

Trematodes of the genus Rhytidodoides are parasitic in marine turtles. Of the already known species, Rhytidodoides similis Price, 1939, occurs especially in the gall bladder. In this study, we surveyed 73 green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) in the Ogasawara Islands, Japan, and detected Rhytidodoides sp. Read More

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Sensitivity of turtles to anticoagulant rodenticides: Risk assessment for green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) in the Ogasawara Islands and comparison of warfarin sensitivity among turtle species.

Aquat Toxicol 2021 Apr 25;233:105792. Epub 2021 Feb 25.

Laboratory of Toxicology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 18 Nishi 9, Kita-ku, Sapporo, 060-0818, Japan. Electronic address:

Although anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) are effectively used for the control of invasive rodents, nontarget species are also frequently exposed to ARs and secondary poisonings occur widely. However, little data is available on the effects of ARs, especially on marine organisms. To evaluate the effects of ARs on marine wildlife, we chose green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas), which are one of the most common marine organisms around the Ogasawara islands, as our primary study species. Read More

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Investigating the effects of nest shading on the green turtle (Chelonia mydas) hatchling phenotype in the Ogasawara islands using a field-based split clutch experiment.

J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol 2020 11 7;333(9):629-636. Epub 2020 Sep 7.

Laboratory of Animal Behavior and Environmental Science, Department of Agriculture, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kanagawa, Japan.

The Ogasawara Islands are an important rookery for the green turtle (Chelonia mydas) in the North Pacific. Green turtles possess temperature-dependent sex determination, and warmer incubation temperatures produce more females than males. Therefore, conservation practices such as nest shading may be required for this population to mitigate the effect of global warming on their sex ratio. Read More

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November 2020

Main airway throughout the nasal cavity of green sea turtles is lined by keratinized stratified squamous epithelium.

Tissue Cell 2020 Aug 19;65:101370. Epub 2020 Apr 19.

Laboratory of Veterinary Anatomy, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555, Japan.

Structural and histological features of the nasal cavity of sea turtles are largely different from those of other Testudines species. The sea turtle nasal cavity is a pair of tubular structures with three diverticula and an excavation in the center, and three types of sensory epithelium are present in these four significant structures. To more clarify the adaptation of the nasal cavity to marine life style in sea turtles, non-sensory epithelium in the nasal cavity of green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) were histologically determined from nostril to choanae in this study. Read More

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Behavioral effects of scents from male mature Rathke glands on juvenile green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas).

J Vet Med Sci 2020 Sep 13;82(9):1312-1315. Epub 2020 Jul 13.

Laboratory of Veterinary Anatomy, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555, Japan.

Sea turtles can detect airborne and waterborne odors, but whether they recognize scents from the same species and if so, how they affect their behavior remains unknown. The present study evaluated the behavioral effects of odorants on juvenile green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas). The odorants were derived from Rathke glands (external scent glands) of mature male green sea turtles, and from two types of food. Read More

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September 2020

Computed tomographic analysis of internal structures within the nasal cavities of green, loggerhead and leatherback sea turtles.

Anat Rec (Hoboken) 2021 03 24;304(3):584-590. Epub 2020 Jun 24.

Laboratory of Veterinary Anatomy, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Japan.

The morphology of the tetrapod nasal cavity has adapted to the environment in terms of olfaction and respiration. Reports indicate that the internal structure of the nasal cavity of green sea turtles is more complex than that of turtles in general, but whether or not it is similar among sea turtle species remains unknown. The present study aimed to define the internal structures of the nasal cavity of green (Chelonian mydas), loggerhead (Caretta caretta) and leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) sea turtles using computed tomography. Read More

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Infection by and Molecular Features of (Digenea: Schistosomatoidea) in Green Sea Turtles () on the Ogasawara Islands, Japan.

J Parasitol 2019 08;105(4):533-538

3   Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology, Faculty of Agriculture, Iwate University, 3-18-8 Ueda, Morioka 020-8550, Japan.

Price, 1934 , is a blood fluke found in sea turtles, and the adult fluke parasitizes the cardiovascular system of the host. In this study we surveyed 46 green sea turtles, , on the Ogasawara Islands, Japan, and blood flukes were detected in the heart and blood vessels of 26 turtles. The flukes were identified as based on a detailed morphological description. Read More

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Sex Differences and the Heritability of Scute Pattern Abnormalities in the Green Sea Turtle from the Ogasawara Archipelago, Japan.

Zoolog Sci 2017 Aug;34(4):281-286

3 Laboratory of Veterinary Physiology, Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo 183-0054, Japan.

Although scute pattern abnormalities in sea turtle species are considered to be strongly correlated with survival rate, there is little information available regarding these abnormalities and the primary cause for their development is unclear. For the conservation of sea turtle species, accumulating basic knowledge of scute pattern abnormalities is a fundamental step towards a better understanding of the causes of these abnormalities. In the present study, we counted vertebral and costal scutes from adults hunted for food (male and female) (n = 899), nesting females (n = 155), and hatchlings (n = 44,537) of the green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) from the Ogasawara Archipelago, Japan. Read More

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Individual variation in feeding habitat use by adult female green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas): are they obligately neritic herbivores?

Oecologia 2006 Aug 9;149(1):52-64. Epub 2006 May 9.

Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, Nakano, Tokyo 164-8639, Japan.

Satellite telemetry and stable isotope analysis were used to confirm that oceanic areas (where water depths are >200 m) are alternative feeding habitats for adult female green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas), which have been thought to be obligate herbivores in neritic areas (where depths are <200 m). Four females were tagged with satellite transmitters and tracked during post-nesting periods from Ogasawara Islands, Japan. Three females migrated to neritic habitats, while transmissions from another female ceased in an oceanic habitat. Read More

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