311 results match your criteria mvd hfs


Microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm involving the vertebral artery.

Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2021 Dec 6. Epub 2021 Dec 6.

Department of Neurosurgery, The Affiliated Huaian No.1 People's Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, 6 West Beijing Road, Huaian, 223001, Jiangsu, China.

Objective: Microvascular decompression (MVD) has become an accepted treatment modality for the vertebral artery (VA)-involved hemifacial spasm (HFS). The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate clinical and surgical outcomes of HFS patients undergoing MVD and surgical and cranial nerve complications and investigate reasonable transposition procedures for two different anatomic variations of VA.

Methods: Between January and December 2018, 109 patients underwent first MVD for HFS involving VA at Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital. Read More

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December 2021

How to Improve the Effect of Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm: A Retrospective Study of 32 Cases with Unsuccessful First Time MVD.

J Neurol Surg A Cent Eur Neurosurg 2021 Nov 15. Epub 2021 Nov 15.

Department of Neurosurgery, Xinhua Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

Background:  Microvascular decompression (MVD) has become accepted as an effective therapeutic option for hemifacial spasm (HFS); however, the curative rate of MVD for HFS varies widely (50-98%) in different medical centers. This study could contribute to the improvement of the MVD procedure.

Methods:  We retrospectively analyzed 32 patients in whom initial MVD failed in other hospitals and who underwent a second MVD at our center. Read More

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November 2021

Simultaneous Endoscopic and Microscopic Visualization in Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm.

Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown) 2021 Nov;21(6):540-548

Department of Neurosurgery, The Ohio State Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA.

Background: Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a socially limiting condition leading to decreased quality of life that can be treated with microvascular decompression (MVD). Endoscopy has been described as an adjunct to traditional microscopy for MVD, although the best visualization technique is debated.

Objective: To review the current literature on use of endoscopy in MVD for HFS and to describe the simultaneous microscopic and endoscopic visualization technique along with a video illustration. Read More

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November 2021

Intraoperative findings of abnormal muscle response for hemifacial spasm following botulinum neurotoxin treatment.

Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2021 12 9;163(12):3303-3309. Epub 2021 Oct 9.

Department of Neurosurgery, Brain Research Institute, University of Niigata, 1-757, Asahimachi-dori, Chuo-ku, Niigata, 951-8585, Japan.

Objective: This study aimed to investigate the effect of preoperative botulinum toxin (BTX) injection on intraoperative abnormal muscle response (AMR) in patients with hemifacial spasm (HFS).

Methods: A total of 104 patients (32 men, 72 women) who underwent microvascular decompression (MVD) for HFS were included in this study. A total of 62 patients without and 42 patients with preoperative BTX treatments were assigned to group A and group B, respectively. Read More

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December 2021

Infrafloccular approach effectively prevents hearing complication in microvascular decompression surgery for hemifacial spasm.

Br J Neurosurg 2021 Oct 8:1-4. Epub 2021 Oct 8.

Department of Neurosurgery, Mitsui Memorial Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Objective: The infrafloccular approach in microvascular decompression (MVD) surgery for hemifacial spasm (HFS) was investigated for the prevention of hearing complications.

Methods: Retrospective analysis of 136 patients who underwent MVD for HFS in 2019. The infrafloccular approach for MVD was adopted to resolve the symptom and protect hearing function. Read More

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October 2021

Factors Influencing Patient Satisfaction after Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm: A Focus on Residual Spasms.

Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 2021 Sep 22:1-9. Epub 2021 Sep 22.

Department of Neurosurgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Introduction: Patients with hemifacial spasm (HFS) experience improvement in symptoms after microvascular decompression (MVD); however, patient satisfaction is sometimes low. This study aimed to analyze the relationship between residual spasms and patient satisfaction, identify factors affecting satisfaction, and investigate the degree of improvement in spasms which result in patient satisfaction after surgery.

Methods: 297 patients who completed a questionnaire after MVD for HFS between March 2020 and June 2020 were included. Read More

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September 2021

Long-Term Retrospective Analysis of Re-do Microvascular Decompression in Patients With Hemifacial Spasm.

Front Neurol 2021 1;12:687945. Epub 2021 Sep 1.

Department of Neurosurgery, Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing, China.

To explore the clinical characteristics of patients with persistent or recurrent hemifacial spasm (HFS) and the experience of microvascular decompression (MVD) in the treatment of such patients to accumulate additional clinical evidence for optimal treatment protocols. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data, surgical methods and treatment efficacies of 176 patients with persistent or recurrent HFS from January 2009 to January 2018. Missing compression zones was the main reason for symptom persistence (87. Read More

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September 2021

The novel prognostic value of postoperative follow-up lateral spread response after microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm.

J Neurosurg 2021 Sep 3:1-5. Epub 2021 Sep 3.

Departments of1Neurosurgery.

Objective: The lateral spread response (LSR) is an aberrant electrophysiological response in which a stimulus on one branch of the facial nerve spills over to other branches of the nerve, which can be captured by electrodes near each branch. The authors performed this study to evaluate the prognostic value of the follow-up LSR with a sufficient time interval from intraoperative LSR (IO-LSR) after microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm (HFS), excluding the interference of various intraoperative situations.

Methods: A total of 247 patients treated with MVD for HFS between June 2011 and March 2019 were enrolled in this study. Read More

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September 2021

Lateral spread response of different facial muscles during microvascular decompression in hemifacial spasm.

Clin Neurophysiol 2021 10 12;132(10):2503-2509. Epub 2021 Aug 12.

Department of Neurosurgery, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Objective: Interpreting lateral spread response (LSR) during microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm (HFS) is difficult when LSRs observed in different muscles do not match. We aimed to analyze LSR patterns recorded in both the orbicularis oris (oris) and mentalis muscles and their relationships with clinical outcomes.

Methods: The data of 1288 HFS patients who underwent MVD between 2015 and 2018 were retrospectively reviewed. Read More

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October 2021

Endoscopic Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm: A Technical Case Report Demonstrating the Benefits of the Angled Endoscope and Intraoperative Neuromonitoring.

Cureus 2021 Jul 23;13(7):e16586. Epub 2021 Jul 23.

Neurosurgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA.

A 57-year-old female with eight years of hemifacial spasm (HFS) underwent endoscopic microvascular decompression (MVD) of the facial nerve. Baseline stimulation of the zygomatic branch of the facial nerve activated at 1.2 mA. Read More

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Roles of preoperative anxiety and depression in the outcomes of microvascular decompression in hemifacial spasm for adolescent patients.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2021 Aug;100(32):e26831

Department of Otolaryngology, Anhui No.2 Provincial People's Hospital, Hefei, Anhui Province, China.

Abstract: Hemifacial spasm (HFS) has been recognized as the frequently occurring disease of cranial nerve. At the same time, several articles indicate that, dystonia results in certain psychological disorders. Consequently, this study aimed to examine the association of preoperative depression and anxiety with HFS severity; meanwhile, the role in microvascular decompression (MVD) outcomes after surgery among adolescent patients was also examined. Read More

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The Efficacy and Safety of <2 cm Micro-Keyhole Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm.

Front Surg 2021 28;8:685155. Epub 2021 Jul 28.

Department of Neurosurgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.

Microvascular decompression (MVD) surgery has been accepted as a minimally invasive surgical modality for the treatment of hemifacial spasm (HFS). However, the size of the bone window does not match the concept of minimally invasive. This study is aimed at evaluating the efficacy and safety of <2 cm micro-keyhole MVD. Read More

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Culprit vascular patterns and surgical outcomes of hemifacial spasm caused by an AICA segment passing between cranial nerve VII and VIII: A series of 25 cases.

Clin Neurol Neurosurg 2021 08 24;207:106777. Epub 2021 Jun 24.

Department of Neurosurgery, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, China. Electronic address:

Objective: To report the vascular anatomic characteristics and surgical outcomes of hemifacial spasm (HFS) caused by an anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) segment passing between cranial nerve VII (CN VII) and cranial nerve VIII (CN VIII).

Patients And Methods: This case series study retrospectively reviewed records of 1040 consecutive patients treated with MVD for HFS in our hospital in 10 years. 25 patients had the culprit vessel recorded as an AICA segment passing between CN VII and CN VIII. Read More

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Hemifacial Spasm: Comparison of Results between Patients Older and Younger than 70 Years Operated on with Microvascular Decompression.

J Neurol Surg A Cent Eur Neurosurg 2021 Jul 8. Epub 2021 Jul 8.

Neurosurgery Department, Xinhua Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.

Objective:  The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of microvascular decompression (MVD) for primary hemifacial spasm (HFS) in patients aged ≥70 years and to compare the outcome with a control cohort of younger patients(<70 years).

Methods:  In this retrospective study, subjects were divided into two groups: an elderly group (patients who were ≥70 years) and a younger group. We compared demographic and clinical data, surgical outcome, MVD-related complications, and duration of operation and hospitalization after MVD between the two groups. Read More

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Feasibility of underwater microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm: a technical note.

Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2021 09 4;163(9):2435-2444. Epub 2021 Jul 4.

Department of Neurosurgery, Aichi Medical University, 1-1 Yazakokarimata, Nagakute, Aichi Prefecture, 480-1195, Japan.

Background: We present a case series of underwater microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm (HFS) and an evaluation of its feasibility and safety.

Methods: This retrospective study was conducted at a single institution and included 20 patients with HFS who underwent underwater MVD between September 2019 and January 2021. Surgery was performed in 3 steps, as follows: exoscopic wound opening (soft tissue, bone, dura, and arachnoid around the cerebellomedullary cistern), underwater endoscopic surgery (decompression of the facial nerve), and exoscopic wound closure. Read More

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September 2021

Facial root entry/exit zone contact in microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm: a historical control study.

Ann Transl Med 2021 May;9(10):834

Department of Neurosurgery, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China.

Background: Microvascular decompression (MVD) surgery is recognized as an effective treatment for hemifacial spasm (HFS). In MVD surgery, biocompatible materials are usually implanted at the neurovascular conflict site in contact with the offending vessel and the facial root entry/exit zone (REZ). Another procedure of implanting the materials between the responsible vessel and the supraolivary fossa without REZ contact has also been applied. Read More

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Association of Thyroid Hypofunction with Clinical Outcomes after Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm.

Eur Neurol 2021 27;84(4):288-294. Epub 2021 May 27.

Department of Neurosurgery, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Introduction: Data regarding the association between thyroid dysfunction and hemifacial spasm (HFS) are limited. We conducted a single-center, retrospective study to investigate the predictive value of thyroid dysfunction in patients with HFS after microvascular decompression (MVD).

Methods: Between July 2004 and January 2015, 156 patients who were tested for thyroid hormones after MVD for HFS were enrolled in the present study. Read More

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A New Application of Gelatin Sponge in the Treatment of Hemifacial Spasm by Microvascular Decompression: A Technical Note.

J Neurol Surg A Cent Eur Neurosurg 2021 May 19. Epub 2021 May 19.

Department of Neurosurgery, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai, China.

Objectives:  Microvascular decompression (MVD) for facial nerve remains the highly efficient hemifacial spasm (HFS) treatment. Nonetheless, a variety of cases have poor response to MVD. Using Teflon plus gelatin sponge in MVD seems to be a good solution. Read More

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Sequential Change of Facial Nerve Motor Function after Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm: An Electrophysiological Study.

Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo) 2021 Aug 14;61(8):461-467. Epub 2021 May 14.

Department of Neurosurgery, Nakamura Memorial Hospital.

Hemifacial spasm (HFS) patients occasionally present with preoperative facial weakness (PFW) or develop delayed facial palsy (DFP) after microvascular decompression (MVD). This study is aimed to evaluate the neurophysiology underlying facial nerve motor dysfunction in HFS patients preoperatively and postoperatively. In all, 54 HFS patients without prior botulinum toxin injection who underwent MVD were retrospectively reviewed. Read More

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Hemifacial spasm caused by a tortuous recurrent perforating artery: A case report.

Authors:
L Li H Zhang

Neurochirurgie 2021 Sep 15;67(5):487-490. Epub 2021 Apr 15.

Department of Neurosurgery, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, NO. 37 Guoxue Alley, Chengdu, China. Electronic address:

Introduction: When the culprit vessel in hemifacial spasm (HFS) is hard to determine, this is a challenge in microvascular decompression (MVD) surgery. In such a situation, small arteries such as perforators to the brainstem might be suspected. But small arteries are omnipresent near the facial nerve root exit/entry zone (fREZ). Read More

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September 2021

Challenging Microvascular Decompression Surgery for Hemifacial Spasm.

World Neurosurg 2021 07 2;151:e94-e99. Epub 2021 Apr 2.

Department of Neurosurgery, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address:

Objective: Microvascular decompression (MVD) is the most effective treatment for hemifacial spasm (HFS). However, surgical difficulties due to complex anatomy or revision surgery can endanger the functional integrity of the brainstem. We describe surgically challenging cases and provide operative guidance that may be helpful for neurosurgeons who perform MVDs. Read More

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Is MVD the effective treatment for poorly controlled hypertension?

J Clin Neurosci 2021 Apr 25;86:20-25. Epub 2021 Jan 25.

Department of Neurosurgery, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 180 Fenglin Road, Shanghai 200032, China.

Background: Studies have shown that microvascular decompression (MVD) surgery could improve the clinical symptoms of hemifacial spasm (HFS) and decrease the blood pressure (BP) in patients with refractory hypertension. More positive long-term results are required to establish MVD as a treatment option for high blood pressure (HBP) and to refine the patient selection criteria.

Methods: From October 2015 to September 2018, based on patient selection for cases with both HFS and poorly controlled HBP of nervous origin, MVD surgeries were performed on 12 patients aiming for better BP control. Read More

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Fully endoscopic versus microscopic vascular decompression for hemifacial spasm: a retrospective cohort study.

Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2021 09 25;163(9):2417-2423. Epub 2021 Mar 25.

Department of Neurosurgery, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, No. 2 Yinghua Dongjie, Hepingli, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China.

Introduction: Microvascular decompression (MVD) is the preferred surgical method for hemifacial spasm (HFS). The purpose of this study was to analyze the effectiveness and safety of fully endoscopic MVD for HFS relative to microscopic MVD.

Material And Methods: The retrospective study was conducted on HFS patients who underwent microscopic or fully endoscopic MVD from January 2018 to March 2019. Read More

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September 2021

Endoscopic Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm.

Asian J Neurosurg 2020 Oct-Dec;15(4):833-838. Epub 2020 Oct 18.

Department of Neurosurgery, Banbuntane Hotokukai Hospital, Fujita Health University, Nagoya, Japan.

Introduction And Objective: Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a condition, characterized by painless, involuntary unilateral tonic or clonic contractions of the facial muscles innervated by the ipsilateral facial nerve. HFS starts with contractions in the orbicularis oculi muscle with subsequent eyelid closure and/or eyebrow elevation, but may spread to involve muscles of the frontalis, platysma, and orbicularis oris muscles. Microvascular decompression (MVD) is reliable and accepted surgical treatment for HFS. Read More

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October 2020

Outcome of Endoscope-Assisted Microvascular Decompression in Patients With Hemifacial Spasm Caused by Severe Indentation of the Brain Stem at the Pontomedullary Sulcus by the Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery.

Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown) 2021 05;20(6):E399-E405

Department of Neurosurgery, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.

Background: Microvascular decompression (MVD) is the most effective treatment option for hemifacial spasm (HFS). However, deeply located forms of compression would require proper identification to allow for adequate decompression.

Objective: To describe the usefulness of endoscopic visualization in one of the most challenging compression patterns in HFS, where the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) loop is severely indenting the brain stem at the proximal root exit zone of facial nerve along the pontomedullary sulcus. Read More

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Treatment for Hemifacial Spasm Associated with a Dissecting Vertebral Artery Aneurysm Requiring Microvascular Decompression in Addition to Endovascular Trapping: A Case Report with Literature Review.

J Neurol Surg A Cent Eur Neurosurg 2021 Mar 9. Epub 2021 Mar 9.

Department of Neurosurgery, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Background:  The treatment protocol for hemifacial spasm (HFS) associated with dissecting vertebral artery aneurysm (DVAA) has not been established.

Case Description:  A-42-year-old man with left HFS underwent endovascular trapping for a DVAA that was identified on brain imaging. Although the dissecting segment was treated successfully, the HFS persisted for 3 months, and subsequently microvascular decompression (MVD) was needed. Read More

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Improving recovery after microvascular decompression surgery for hemifacial spasm: experience from 530 cases with enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol.

Br J Neurosurg 2021 Mar 2:1-6. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Department of Neurosurgery, Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing, China.

Objective: To assess the efficacy of microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm with an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol.

Methods: 984 hemifacial spasm patients who underwent MVD from Jan 2017 to Dec 2017 were analyzed. They were divided into the conventional treatment group (control;  = 453) and the later ERAS group ( = 531). Read More

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Involvement of the vertebral artery in hemifacial spasm: clinical features and surgical strategy.

Sci Rep 2021 03 1;11(1):4915. Epub 2021 Mar 1.

Department of Neurosurgery, Konkuk University Medical Center, 120-1 Neungdong-ro, 17 Gwangjin-gu, Seoul, 05030, Korea.

The vertebral artery (VA)-involved hemifacial spasm (HFS) has distinctive clinical features and performing microvascular decompression (MVD) is challenging. We described the clinical presentations of VA-involved HFS and the outcomes of MVD using the interposition method. Between January 2008 and March 2015, MVD was performed in 271 patients with VA-involved HFS. Read More

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Is the pre-operative lateral spread response on facial electromyography a valid diagnostic tool for hemifacial spasm?

Neurosurg Rev 2021 Dec 9;44(6):3259-3266. Epub 2021 Feb 9.

Department of Neurosurgery, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 1 Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, 130-702, South Korea.

The lateral spread response (LSR) on preoperative facial electromyogram (EMG) is a useful tool in evaluating patients with hemifacial spasm (HFS). There may be some instances where the LSR does not appear on the preoperative EMG, thus disrupting the diagnosis and treatment of HFS. In this study, we evaluated the patients who did not exhibit LSR on preoperative EMG but underwent microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm. Read More

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December 2021

Efficacy of Second Operation for Hemifacial Spasm Within 1 Week After Ineffective Microvascular Decompression.

J Craniofac Surg 2021 Jul-Aug 01;32(5):e495-e498

Department of Neurosurgery, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai.

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of the second operation within 1 week after ineffective microvascular decompression (MVD) for patients with primary hemifacial spasm (HFS), and to find out the causes of failure.

Methods: The surgery records and postoperative follow-ups of 52 primary HFS patients who had poor relief of spasm after their first MVDs were investigated. Patients were divided into 2 groups. Read More

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