25 results match your criteria mig-17

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Genetic interactions among ADAMTS metalloproteases and basement membrane molecules in cell migration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

PLoS One 2020 2;15(12):e0240571. Epub 2020 Dec 2.

Department of Bioscience, Kwansei Gakuin University, Sanda, Japan.

During development of the Caenorhabditis elegans gonad, the gonadal leader cells, called distal tip cells (DTCs), migrate in a U-shaped pattern to form the U-shaped gonad arms. The ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs) family metalloproteases MIG-17 and GON-1 are required for correct DTC migration. Mutations in mig-17 result in misshapen gonads due to the misdirected DTC migration, and mutations in gon-1 result in shortened and swollen gonads due to the premature termination of DTC migration. Read More

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January 2021

A muscle-epidermis-glia signaling axis sustains synaptic specificity during allometric growth in .

Elife 2020 04 7;9. Epub 2020 Apr 7.

Program in Cellular Neuroscience, Neurodegeneration and Repair, Department of Neuroscience and Department of Cell Biology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, United States.

Synaptic positions underlie precise circuit connectivity. Synaptic positions can be established during embryogenesis and sustained during growth. The mechanisms that sustain synaptic specificity during allometric growth are largely unknown. Read More

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The Role of Tissue Inhibitors of Metalloproteinases in Organ Development and Regulation of ADAMTS Family Metalloproteinases in .

Genetics 2019 06 16;212(2):523-535. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577, Japan.

Remodeling of the extracellular matrix supports tissue and organ development, by regulating cellular morphology and tissue integrity. However, proper extracellular matrix remodeling requires spatiotemporal regulation of extracellular metalloproteinase activity. Members of the ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs) family, including MIG-17 and GON-1, are evolutionarily conserved, secreted, zinc-requiring metalloproteinases. Read More

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The safety and efficacy of gastrectomy for gastric cancer among octogenarians: a western population-based study.

J Geriatr Oncol 2019 07 24;10(4):598-603. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Center for Surgery and Public Health, Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.

Objective: The safety of minimally-invasive (MIG) and open gastrectomy (OG) in the older patients has been demonstrated in several international studies but has not been evaluated in the context of a large, Western population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety of gastrectomy by these two approaches among octogenarians in the United States.

Materials And Methods: The National Cancer Database (2010-2014) was queried for patients with gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent MIG or OG. Read More

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Organ Length Control by an ADAMTS Extracellular Protease in Caenorhabditis elegans.

G3 (Bethesda) 2016 05 3;6(5):1449-57. Epub 2016 May 3.

Department of Bioscience, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda 669-1337, Japan

MIG-17, a secreted protease of the ADAMTS family, acts in the directed migration of gonadal distal tip cells (DTCs) through regulation of the gonadal basement membrane in Caenorhabditis elegans Here, we show that MIG-17 is also required for the control of pharynx elongation during animal growth. We found that the pharynx was elongated in mig-17 mutants compared with wild type. MIG-17 localized to the pharyngeal basement membrane as well as to the gonadal basement membrane. Read More

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Control of the basement membrane and cell migration by ADAMTS proteinases: Lessons from C. elegans genetics.

Matrix Biol 2015 May-Jul;44-46:64-9. Epub 2015 Jan 14.

Department of Bioscience, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda 669-1337, Japan. Electronic address:

The members of the ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs) family of secreted proteins, MIG-17 and GON-1, play essential roles in Caenorhabditis elegans gonadogenesis. The genetic and molecular analyses of these proteinases uncovered novel molecular interactions regulating the basement membrane (BM) during the migration of the gonadal leader cells. MIG-17, which is localized to the gonadal BM recruits or activates fibulin-1 and type IV collagen, which then recruits nidogen, thereby inducing the remodeling of the BM that is required for directional control of leader cell migration. Read More

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Developmental defects in a Caenorhabditis elegans model for type III galactosemia.

Genetics 2014 Dec 8;198(4):1559-69. Epub 2014 Oct 8.

Centro Andaluz de Biología del Desarrollo, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas-Universidad Pablo de Olavide-Junta de Andalucía, 41013 Seville, Spain

Type III galactosemia is a metabolic disorder caused by reduced activity of UDP-galactose-4-epimerase, which participates in galactose metabolism and the generation of various UDP-sugar species. We characterized gale-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans and found that a complete loss-of-function mutation is lethal, as has been hypothesized for humans, whereas a nonlethal partial loss-of-function allele causes a variety of developmental abnormalities, likely resulting from the impairment of the glycosylation process. We also observed that gale-1 mutants are hypersensitive to galactose as well as to infections. Read More

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December 2014

Objective and subjective evaluation of larynx in smokers and nonsmokers: a comparative study.

Indian J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2014 Jan 30;66(Suppl 1):99-109. Epub 2011 Nov 30.

Department of ENT & Head Neck Surgery, Pt. Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Medical College, Raipur, Chhattisgarh India.

The deleterious effects of smoking on laryngeal mucosa are indisputable. Smoking not only causes histologic (microscopic) alterations in the vocal fold epithelium but also affect the acoustic property of voice. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of smoking on the laryngeal structures and phonatory physiology via videostroboscopy, acoustic voice analysis and electroglottography. Read More

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January 2014

The novel secreted factor MIG-18 acts with MIG-17/ADAMTS to control cell migration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Genetics 2014 Feb 6;196(2):471-9. Epub 2013 Dec 6.

Department of Bioscience, Kwansei Gakuin University, Sanda 669-1337, Japan.

The migration of Caenorhabditis elegans gonadal distal tip cells (DTCs) offers an excellent model to study the migration of epithelial tubes in organogenesis. mig-18 mutants cause meandering or wandering migration of DTCs during gonad formation, which is very similar to that observed in animals with mutations in mig-17, which encodes a secreted metalloprotease of the ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs) family. MIG-18 is a novel secreted protein that is conserved only among nematode species. Read More

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February 2014

[Role of ADAMTSs in cell migration in the nematode C. elegans].

Seikagaku 2010 Oct;82(10):957-62

Department of Bioscience, Kwansei Gakuin University, Hyogo, Japan.

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October 2010

Genetics of extracellular matrix remodeling during organ growth using the Caenorhabditis elegans pharynx model.

Genetics 2010 Nov 30;186(3):969-82. Epub 2010 Aug 30.

Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, S-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.

The organs of animal embryos are typically covered with an extracellular matrix (ECM) that must be carefully remodeled as these organs enlarge during post-embryonic growth; otherwise, their shape and functions may be compromised. We previously described the twisting of the Caenorhabditis elegans pharynx (here called the Twp phenotype) as a quantitative mutant phenotype that worsens as that organ enlarges during growth. Mutations previously known to cause pharyngeal twist affect membrane proteins with large extracellular domains (DIG-1 and SAX-7), as well as a C. Read More

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November 2010

C. elegans mig-6 encodes papilin isoforms that affect distinct aspects of DTC migration, and interacts genetically with mig-17 and collagen IV.

Development 2009 May 18;136(9):1433-42. Epub 2009 Mar 18.

Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, M5G 1X5, Canada.

The gonad arms of C. elegans hermaphrodites acquire invariant shapes by guided migrations of distal tip cells (DTCs), which occur in three phases that differ in the direction and basement membrane substrata used for movement. We found that mig-6 encodes long (MIG-6L) and short (MIG-6S) isoforms of the extracellular matrix protein papilin, each required for distinct aspects of DTC migration. Read More

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MIG-17/ADAMTS controls cell migration by recruiting nidogen to the basement membrane in C. elegans.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2008 Dec 22;105(52):20804-9. Epub 2008 Dec 22.

RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047, Japan.

Mutations in the a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) family of secreted proteases cause diseases linked to ECM abnormalities. However, the mechanisms by which these enzymes modulate the ECM during development are mostly unexplored. The Caenorhabditis elegans MIG-17/ADAMTS protein is secreted from body wall muscle cells and localizes to the basement membrane (BM) of the developing gonad where it controls directional migration of gonadal leader cells. Read More

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December 2008

Stage-specific activation of MIG-17/ADAMTS controls cell migration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

FEBS J 2008 Sep 14;275(17):4296-305. Epub 2008 Jul 14.

RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology, Hyogo, Japan.

The activation of ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs) family proteases depends on removal of the prodomain. Although several studies suggest that ADAMTS activities play roles in development, homeostasis and disease, it remains unclear when and where the enzymes are activated in vivo. MIG-17, a Caenorhabditis elegans glycoprotein belonging to the ADAMTS family, is secreted from the body wall muscle cells and localizes to the gonadal basement membrane to control the migration of gonadal distal tip cells. Read More

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September 2008

Prodomain-dependent tissue targeting of an ADAMTS protease controls cell migration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

EMBO J 2007 Jun 10;26(11):2607-20. Epub 2007 May 10.

RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology, Kobe, Japan.

Members of the ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs) family of secreted proteins play important roles in animal development and pathogenesis. However, the lack of in vivo models has hampered elucidation of the mechanisms by which these enzymes are recruited to specific target tissues and the timing of their activation during development. Using transgenic worms and primary cell cultures, here we show that MIG-17, an ADAMTS family protein required for gonadal leader cell migration in Caenorhabditis elegans, is recruited to the gonadal basement membrane in a prodomain-dependent manner. Read More

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C. elegans as a model system to study the function of the COG complex in animal development.

Biol Chem 2006 Aug;387(8):1031-5

RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047, Japan.

The conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex is an octameric protein complex associated with the Golgi apparatus and is required for proper sorting and glycosylation of Golgi resident enzymes and secreted proteins. Although COG complex function has been extensively studied at the cellular and subcellular levels, its role in animal development mostly remains unknown. Recently, mutations in the components of the COG complex were found to cause abnormal gonad morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans. Read More

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The conserved oligomeric Golgi complex acts in organ morphogenesis via glycosylation of an ADAM protease in C. elegans.

Development 2006 Jan 14;133(2):263-73. Epub 2005 Dec 14.

RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047, Japan.

In C. elegans, the gonad acquires two U-shaped arms through directed migration of gonadal distal tip cells (DTCs). A member of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family, MIG-17, is secreted from muscle cells and localizes to the gonadal basement membrane where it functions in DTC migration. Read More

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January 2006

A fibulin-1 homolog interacts with an ADAM protease that controls cell migration in C. elegans.

Curr Biol 2004 Nov;14(22):2011-8

RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047, Japan.

ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family proteins play important roles in animal development and pathogenesis. In C. elegans, a secreted ADAM protein, MIG-17, acts from outside the gonad to control the migration of gonadal distal tip cells (DTCs) that promote gonad morphogenesis. Read More

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November 2004

Genetic analysis of pathways regulated by the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor in Caenorhabditis elegans.

PLoS Biol 2004 Oct 7;2(10):e289. Epub 2004 Sep 7.

The Henry Wellcome Building of Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.

The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor functions as a ubiquitin ligase that mediates proteolytic inactivation of hydroxylated alpha subunits of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). Although studies of VHL-defective renal carcinoma cells suggest the existence of other VHL tumor suppressor pathways, dysregulation of the HIF transcriptional cascade has extensive effects that make it difficult to distinguish whether, and to what extent, observed abnormalities in these cells represent effects on pathways that are distinct from HIF. Here, we report on a genetic analysis of HIF-dependent and -independent effects of VHL inactivation by studying gene expression patterns in Caenorhabditis elegans. Read More

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October 2004

An NDPase links ADAM protease glycosylation with organ morphogenesis in C. elegans.

Nat Cell Biol 2004 Jan 21;6(1):31-7. Epub 2003 Dec 21.

RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology and PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047, Japan.

In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the gonad acquires two U-shaped arms through the directed migration of its distal tip cells (DTCs), which are located at the tip of the growing gonad arms. A member of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family, MIG-17, regulates directional migration of DTCs: MIG-17 is synthesized and secreted from the muscle cells of the body wall, and diffuses to the gonad where it is required for DTC migration. The mig-23 mutation causes defective migration of DTCs and interacts genetically with mig-17. Read More

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January 2004

Development. A degrading way to make an organ.

Authors:
J Hardin

Science 2000 Jun;288(5474):2142-3

Department of Zoology and Program in Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Wisconsin, 1117 West Johnson Street, Madison, WI 53706, USA.

Working out how organs form during embryonic development is a fascinating area of research. In a witty Perspective, Jeff Hardin describes new findings (Nishiwaki et al.) that reveal the many intricate steps needed for gonads to form in the worm C. Read More

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Molecular biology. Telomeres keep on rappin'.

Authors:
V Lundblad

Science 2000 Jun;288(5474):2141-2

Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Many molecules help maintain the ends of chromosomes, which get chewed off as cells age. Lundblad in her provocative Perspective now tells us about another protein, hRap1, that regulates the length of telomeres in human cells with the help of the TRF proteins. The homology between hRap1 and its counterpart in yeast suggests how the complex molecular machinery needed to maintain chromosome ends may have evolved. Read More

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A metalloprotease disintegrin that controls cell migration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Science 2000 Jun;288(5474):2205-8

PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Corporation and Fundamental Research Laboratories, NEC Corporation, Miyukigaoka, Tsukuba 305-8501,

In Caenorhabditis elegans, the gonad acquires two U-shaped arms by the directed migration of its distal tip cells (DTCs) along the body wall basement membranes. Correct migration of DTCs requires the mig-17 gene, which encodes a member of the metalloprotease-disintegrin protein family. The MIG-17 protein is secreted from muscle cells of the body wall and localizes in the basement membranes of gonad. Read More

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Mutations affecting symmetrical migration of distal tip cells in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Authors:
K Nishiwaki

Genetics 1999 Jul;152(3):985-97

PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Corporation and Fundamental Research Laboratories, NEC Corporation, Miyukigaoka, Tsukuba 305, Japan.

The rotational symmetry of the Caenorhabditis elegans gonad arms is generated by the symmetrical migration of two distal tip cells (DTCs), located on the anterior and posterior ends of the gonad primordium. Mutations that cause asymmetrical migration of the two DTCs were isolated. All seven mutations were recessive and assigned to six different complementation groups. Read More

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