23 results match your criteria m2s m3s

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Removal of nonimpacted third molars alters the periodontal condition of their neighbors clinically, immunologically, and microbiologically.

Int J Oral Sci 2021 02 7;13(1). Epub 2021 Feb 7.

National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, China.

Considering the adverse effects of nonimpacted third molars (N-M3s) on the periodontal health of adjacent second molars (M2s), the removal of N-M3s may be beneficial to the periodontal health of their neighbors. This study aimed to investigate the clinical, immunological, and microbiological changes of the periodontal condition around M2s following removal of neighboring N-M3s across a 6-month period. Subjects with at least one quadrant containing an intact first molar (M1), M2, and N-M3 were screened and those who met the inclusion criteria and decided to receive N-M3 extraction were recruited in the following investigation. Read More

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February 2021

In situ observations on the dentition and oral cavity of the Neanderthal skeleton from Altamura (Italy).

PLoS One 2020 2;15(12):e0241713. Epub 2020 Dec 2.

Department of Environmental Biology, Sapienza University of Rome, Roma, Italy.

The Neanderthal specimen from Lamalunga Cave, near Altamura (Apulia, Italy), was discovered during a speleological survey in 1993. The specimen is one of the most complete fossil hominins in Europe and its state of preservation is exceptional, although it is stuck in calcareous concretions and the bones are mostly covered by calcite depositions. Nevertheless, it is possible to carry out some observations on craniodental features that have not previously been described. Read More

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January 2021

Evaluation of Risk Factors for External Root Resorption and Dental Caries of Second Molars Associated With Impacted Third Molars.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2020 Sep 7;78(9):1467-1477. Epub 2020 May 7.

Assistant Professor and Department Head, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Van Yüzüncü Yıl University, Van, Turkey.

Purpose: Impacted third molars (M3s) may lead to external root resorption (ERR) and dental caries (DC) in the adjacent second molars (M2s). The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for ERR and DC in M2s associated with impacted M3s.

Materials And Methods: We implemented a cross-sectional study and enrolled a sample composed of patients with M3s and M2s present and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans available for review. Read More

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September 2020

Impacts of non-impacted third molar removal on the periodontal condition of adjacent second molars.

Oral Dis 2020 Jul 12;26(5):1010-1019. Epub 2020 Mar 12.

State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, China.

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine how the removal of non-impacted third molars (N-M3s) affects the periodontal status of neighboring second molars (M2s).

Subjects And Methods: The periodontal condition of M2s for which the neighboring N-M3s were removed (more than 6 months previously) and those with intact N-M3s was analyzed in a cross-sectional observation study. In an additional case series, periodontal changes in M2s in response to adjacent N-M3 removal were observed during a 6-month follow-up period. Read More

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External root resorption in maxillary and mandibular second molars associated with impacted third molars: a cone-beam computed tomographic study.

Clin Oral Investig 2019 Dec 22;23(12):4195-4203. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Guangzhou, 510080, Guangdong, China.

Objective: To separately investigate the prevalence and risk factors of external root resorption (ERR) in maxillary and mandibular second molars (M2s) adjacent to impacted third molars (M3s).

Materials And Methods: CBCT scans involving 184 maxillary and 323 mandibular impacted M3s were included. Age, gender, the impaction status of M3, the presence, severity, and location of ERR in M2 were assessed. Read More

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December 2019

Large Changes in Fluorescent Color and Intensity of Symmetrically Substituted Arylmaleimides Caused by Subtle Structure Modifications.

Chemistry 2018 Jan 6;24(2):322-326. Epub 2017 Dec 6.

Fujian Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Fujian Normal University, No. 8 Shangsan Road, Fuzhou, 350007, China.

Herein we report on four diarylmaleimides based on 3- or 2-substituted benzothiophene (M3S or M2S) and benzofuran (M3O or M2O), which show very different emission properties: aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ), aggregation-induced emission (AIE), and dual-state strong emission (DSE) in both solution and solid states. Their emission color in the solid state can be adjusted from green-yellow into red. M2O displays strong red solid-state emission at 630 nm with a quantum yield of 46. Read More

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January 2018

Effect of Asymptomatic Visible Third Molars on Periodontal Health of Adjacent Second Molars: A Cross-Sectional Study.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2017 Oct 14;75(10):2048-2057. Epub 2017 Apr 14.

Head and Professor, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, People's Republic of China. Electronic address:

Purpose: Evidence that asymptomatic third molars (M3s) negatively affect their adjacent second molars (A-M2s) is limited. The present study evaluated the association between visible M3s (V-M3s) of various clinical status with the periodontal pathologic features of their A-M2s.

Patients And Methods: Subjects with at least 1 quadrant having intact first and second molars, either with V-M3s and symptom free or without adjacent V-M3s, were enrolled in the present cross-sectional investigation. Read More

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October 2017

Association between the eruption of the third molar and caries and periodontitis distal to the second molars in elderly patients.

Kaohsiung J Med Sci 2017 May 27;33(5):246-251. Epub 2017 Mar 27.

Department of Dentistry, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Electronic address:

The objective of this study was to verify whether caries and periodontal diseases, when present on the distal surface of the second molars (M2s), are associated with the eruption of the third molars (M3s). In this split-mouth study, we evaluated 70 elderly patients with unilateral maxillary or mandibular M3s who presented to the outpatient clinics of two hospitals. Patients underwent comprehensive oral examinations and radiographical measurements, and we assessed the outcomes of periodontal disease and caries. Read More

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Nonimpacted Third Molars Affect the Periodontal Status of Adjacent Teeth: A Cross-Sectional Study.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2017 Jul 15;75(7):1344-1350. Epub 2017 Feb 15.

Head and Professor, Department of Periodontology, National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, China. Electronic address:

Purpose: Most previous studies of the effect of third molars (M3s) on the health of adjacent second molars (A-M2s) have focused on impacted M3s (I-M3s). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether nonimpacted M3 (N-M3s) could affect the periodontal status of A-M2s.

Patients And Methods: In this cross-sectional study, patients (≥18 years) who had at least 1 quadrant with intact first and second molars and a nonimpacted or absent M3 were enrolled in this study. Read More

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Influence of Non-Impacted Third Molars on Pathologies of Adjacent Second Molars: A Retrospective Study.

J Periodontol 2017 05 15;88(5):450-456. Epub 2016 Dec 15.

Department of Periodontology, National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, People's Republic of China.

Background: Although removal of impacted third molars (I-M3s) is common in dental clinics, the decision to retain or remove asymptomatic non-impacted third molars (N-M3s) presents a significant challenge. This study investigates influence of N-M3s on pathologies of adjacent second molars (A-M2s).

Methods: Clinical status of M3s was evaluated, and presence of distal caries, external root resorption (ERR), and alveolar bone loss (ABL) of A-M2s was assessed by orthopantomograms (OPGs). Read More

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Orthodontic Extraction of High-Risk Impacted Mandibular Third Molars in Close Proximity to the Mandibular Canal: A Systematic Review.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2015 Sep 24;73(9):1672-85. Epub 2015 Mar 24.

Clinical Professor, Orthodontic and Pediatric Dentistry Programs, Eastman Institute for Oral Health, University of Rochester, NY.

Purpose: Extraction of mandibular third molars (M3s) in close proximity to the mandibular canal has some inherent risks to adjacent structures, such as neurologic damage to teeth, bone defects distal to the mandibular second molar (M2), or pathologic fractures in association with enlarged dentigerous cysts. The procedure for extrusion and subsequent extraction of high-risk M3s is called orthodontic extraction. This is a systematic review of the available approaches for orthodontic extraction of impacted mandibular M3s in close proximity to the mandibular canal and their outcomes. Read More

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September 2015

How much more would KNM-WT 15000 have grown?

J Hum Evol 2015 Mar 14;80:74-82. Epub 2014 Nov 14.

Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1830 E. Monument St., Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Electronic address:

Because of its completeness, the juvenile Homo ergaster/erectus KNM-WT 15000 has played an important role in studies of the evolution of body form in Homo. Early attempts to estimate his adult body size used modern human growth models. However, more recent evidence, particularly from the dentition, suggests that he may have had a more chimpanzee-like growth trajectory. Read More

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Orthodontic extrusion of horizontally impacted mandibular molars.

Int J Clin Exp Med 2014 15;7(10):3320-6. Epub 2014 Oct 15.

Department of Oral Surgery, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Stomatology Shanghai, P. R. China.

Objective: To introduce and evaluate a novel approach in treating horizontally impacted mandibular second and third molars.

Materials And Methods: An orthodontic technique was applied for treatment of horizontally impacted mandibular second and third molars, which included a push-type spring for rotation first, and then a cantilever for extrusion. There were 8 mandibular third molars (M3s) and 2 second molars (M2s) in this study. Read More

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November 2014

Radiological infrabony defects after impacted mandibular third molar extractions in young adults.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2013 Dec 24;71(12):2020-8. Epub 2013 Sep 24.

PhD Student, Department of Stomatology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Spain.

Purpose: To estimate the prevalence of infrabony defects and their healing at the distal aspect of mandibular second molars (M2s) after extraction of impacted mandibular third molars (M3s).

Materials And Methods: This prospective clinical study included 22 young healthy patients (21.03 ± 4. Read More

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December 2013

Mandibular second molar periodontal healing after impacted third molar extraction in young adults.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2012 Dec 16;70(12):2732-41. Epub 2012 Sep 16.

Department of Stomatology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Spain.

Purpose: To estimate the prevalence of preoperative periodontal defects and analyze 12-month spontaneous healing on the distal aspect of the mandibular second molar (M2) after impacted mandibular third molar (M3) extraction.

Materials And Methods: This prospective clinical study was conducted in 25 healthy young patients (21.03 ± 4. Read More

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December 2012

Treatment of intrabony defects after impacted mandibular third molar removal with bioabsorbable and non-resorbable membranes.

J Periodontol 2011 Oct 22;82(10):1404-13. Epub 2011 Feb 22.

Department of Oral and Dental Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

Background: Mandibular second molar (M2) periodontal defects after third molar (M3) removal in high-risk patients are a clinical dilemma for clinicians. This study compares the healing of periodontal intrabony defects at distal surfaces of mandibular M2s using bioabsorbable and non-resorbable membranes.

Methods: Eleven patients with bilateral probing depths (PDs) ≥6 mm distal to mandibular M2s and intrabony defects ≥3 mm, related to the total impaction of M3s, were treated with M3 extraction and covering of the surgical bone defect with a bioabsorbable collagen barrier on one side and a non-resorbable expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) barrier contralaterally. Read More

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October 2011

The chronology of second and third molar development in Koreans and its application to forensic age estimation.

Int J Legal Med 2010 Nov 10;124(6):659-65. Epub 2010 Sep 10.

Division of Forensic Medicine, National Forensic Service, 331-1 Shinwol 7-Dong, Yangcheon-Gu, Seoul, 158-707, South Korea.

The accuracy of forensic age estimation based on the chronology of second (M2) and third molar (M3) development was investigated using 2,087 orthopantomograms of Korean men and women aged between 3 and 23 years. The developmental stages of M2s and M3s in these subjects were classified using the criteria of Demirjian. Inter-observer reliability and statistical data on each stage of mineralization of M2s and M3s were evaluated. Read More

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November 2010

Observation of lateral mandibular protuberance in Taiwan macaque (Macaca cyclopis) using computed tomography imaging.

Front Oral Biol 2009 21;13:60-64. Epub 2009 Sep 21.

Morphological characteristics of the protuberance on the external surface of the mandible in Taiwan macaque (Macaca cyclopis) was investigated using cone-beam computed tomography. We observed 49 skulls of M. cyclopis. Read More

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Interproximal wear facets and tooth associations in the Paşalar hominoid sample.

J Hum Evol 2008 Apr;54(4):480-93

Dil ve Tarih Cografya Enstitüsü, Palaoantropoloji, Ankara Universitesi, Sihhiye/Ankara, Turkey.

Interproximal wear facets were examined on hominoid teeth from the middle Miocene site at Paşalar, Turkey. The aim was to find matches between adjacent premolar and molar teeth from single individuals that were collected in the field as isolated teeth and use them to reconstruct tooth rows. These were then used to investigate: (1) the wear gradient on the molar teeth; (2) the dispersal of teeth from single mandibles and maxillae; (3) the size ratios among the molars; and (4) the number of individuals represented by the hominoid sample. Read More

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The value of CD64 expression in distinguishing acute myeloid leukemia with monocytic differentiation from other subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia: a flow cytometric analysis of 64 cases.

Arch Pathol Lab Med 2007 May;131(5):748-54

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina, CB# 7525, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7525, USA.

Context: Flow cytometric immunophenotyping is a useful ancillary tool in the diagnosis and subclassification of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs). A recent study concluded that CD64 is sensitive and specific for distinguishing AMLs with a monocytic component (ie, AML M4 and AML M5) from other AML subtypes. However, in that study, the intensity of CD64 was not well defined and the number of non-M4/non-M5 AMLs was small. Read More

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Enamel thickness of deciduous and permanent molars in modern Homo sapiens.

Authors:
F E Grine

Am J Phys Anthropol 2005 Jan;126(1):14-31

Department of Anthropology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-4364, USA.

This study presents data on the enamel thickness of deciduous (dm2) and permanent (M1-M3) molars for a geographically diverse sample of modern humans. Measurements were recorded from sections through the mesial cusps of unworn teeth. Enamel is significantly thinner on deciduous than on permanent molars, and there is a distinct trend for enamel to increase in relative thickness from M1 to M3. Read More

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January 2005

Healing following GTR treatment of bone defects distal to mandibular 2nd molars after surgical removal of impacted 3rd molars.

J Clin Periodontol 2000 May;27(5):325-32

Department of Periodontology, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.

Aim: The purpose of this study was to study the healing, following guided tissue regeneration (GTR) treatment, of bone defects distal to mandibular 2nd molars (M2s) after surgical removal of impacted mesioangularly or horizontally inclined third molars (M3s) in patients > or = 25 years.

Method: 20 patients with bilateral soft tissue impacted M3s were included in the split-mouth study. The 2 sites to be treated in each patient were randomised before the 1st operation as to which would undergo the test procedure and which would be the control site. Read More

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Preliminary observations on the BK 8518 mandible from Baringo, Kenya.

Am J Phys Anthropol 1986 Jan;69(1):117-27

A newly discovered adult hominid mandible (BK 8518) from Baringo, Kenya, is described and assessed. The corpus, many of the tooth crowns, and most of the left ascending ramus are preserved. The teeth are heavily and asymmetrically worn. Read More

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January 1986
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