12 results match your criteria literacy fotonovela

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Culturally adapted depression education and engagement in treatment among Hispanics in primary care: outcomes from a pilot feasibility study.

BMC Fam Pract 2019 10 21;20(1):140. Epub 2019 Oct 21.

Department of Psychiatry, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA.

Background: Low use of anti-depressant medication, poor doctor-patient communication, and persistent stigma are key barriers to the treatment of depression in Hispanics. Common concerns include fears about the addictive and harmful properties of antidepressants, worries about taking too many pills, and the stigma attached to taking medications and seeking mental health treatments. In 2014, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) funded the Depression Screening and Education: Options to Reduce Barriers to Treatment (DESEO) project to implement an education intervention designed to increase disease literacy and dispel myths about depression and its treatment among Hispanic patients thus reducing stigma and increasing treatment engagement. Read More

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October 2019

A culturally and linguistically salient pilot intervention to promote colorectal cancer screening among Latinos receiving care in a Federally Qualified Health Center.

Health Educ Res 2019 06;34(3):310-320

Department of Health Behavior and Outcomes, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA.

Despite established benefits, colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is underutilized among Latinos/Hispanics. We conducted a pilot 2-arm randomized controlled trial evaluating efficacy of two intervention conditions on CRC screening uptake among Latinos receiving care in community clinics. Participants (N = 76) were aged 50-75, most were foreign-born, preferred to receive their health information in Spanish, and not up-to-date with CRC screening. Read More

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Sweet Temptations: How Does Reading a Fotonovela About Diabetes Affect Dutch Adults with Different Levels of Literacy?

Health Commun 2018 03 17;33(3):284-290. Epub 2017 Jan 17.

a Department of Communication and Information Sciences , University of Groningen.

Recent studies suggest that health-related fotonovelas-booklets that portray a dramatic story using photographs and captions-may be effective health communication tools, especially for readers with a low level of literacy. In this experiment, effects on knowledge and behavioral intentions were assessed of a fotonovela originally developed for a Latin-American audience. Dutch readers from a low literacy group (N = 89) and a high literacy group (N = 113) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: a fotonovela condition (all captions translated into Dutch), a traditional brochure condition (also in Dutch), and a control condition. Read More

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Depression Screening and Education: Options to Reduce Barriers to Treatment (DESEO): protocol for an educational intervention study.

BMC Health Serv Res 2016 07 29;16:322. Epub 2016 Jul 29.

Department of Psychiatry, UT Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, TX, 75390-9119, USA.

Background: Barriers to depression treatment among Hispanic populations include persistent stigma, inadequate doctor patient communication (DPC) and resultant sub-optimal use of anti-depressant medications. Stigma is primarily perpetuated due to inadequate disease literacy and cultural factors. Common concerns about depression treatments among Hispanics include fears about the addictive and harmful properties of antidepressants, worries about taking too many pills, and the stigma attached to taking psychotropic medications. Read More

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Qualitative Exploration of an Effective Depression Literacy Fotonovela with at Risk Latina Immigrants.

Am J Community Psychol 2015 Sep;56(1-2):79-88

Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, 3620 McClintock Avenue, SGM 1001, Los Angeles, CA, 90089-1061, USA,

While depression is prevalent among immigrant Latinas, mental health literacy is low. Culturally tailored health narratives can improve mental health literacy and are now increasingly featured in Spanish language fotonovelas (i.e. Read More

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September 2015

Comparing the impact on Latinos of a depression brochure and an entertainment-education depression fotonovela.

Psychiatr Serv 2015 Mar 1;66(3):313-6. Epub 2014 Dec 1.

Dr. Cabassa and Mr. Oh are with the School of Social Work, Columbia University, New York City (e-mail: ). Dr. Humensky is with the Center of Excellence in Cultural Competence, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York City. Dr. Unger is with the Department of Preventive Medicine, Mr. Molina is with the School of Pharmacy, and Dr. Baron is with the School of Pharmacy, all at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles.

Objective: The purpose was to evaluate the impact of a depression fotonovela in increasing knowledge of depression symptoms and treatments and reducing stigma among Latinos.

Methods: Data were from a randomized controlled trial in which Latinos from adult schools (N=132) were assigned to receive the fotonovela or a depression brochure and were assessed on knowledge and stigma measures before and after reading the material and one month later. Random-effects linear and logistic regression models assessed changes within and between groups. Read More

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Effectiveness of a fotonovela for reducing depression and stress in Latino dementia family caregivers.

Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord 2015 Apr-Jun;29(2):146-53

*Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences †Stanford Geriatric Education Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford ‡Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Davis §Pacific Graduate School of Psychology, Palo Alto University, Palo Alto, CA.

The clinical need to address stress and depression in Latino dementia caregivers (CGs) combined with low health literacy and less accurate knowledge of dementia motivated the development of a pictorial tool [called a fotonovela (FN)] to teach (a) coping skills for caregiver (CG) stress; (b) self-assessment of depression; and (c) encourage improved utilization of available resources. To test the effectiveness of the FN, 110 of 147 Latino CGs, who were randomly assigned to the Fotonovela Condition (FNC) or the Usual Information Condition (UIC), were included in the final analyses. Self-report measures were given at baseline and post intervention. Read More

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February 2016

Entertainment-education? A fotonovela? A new strategy to improve depression literacy and help-seeking behaviors in at-risk immigrant Latinas.

Am J Community Psychol 2013 Dec;52(3-4):224-35

School of Social Welfare, University of California, Berkeley, 120 Haviland Hall #7400, Berkeley, CA, 94720-7400, USA,

Research shows high risk for depression among immigrant Latinas known to increase during the acculturation process. Several barriers such as stigma and low health literacy result in an under-utilization of needed treatment among these women. In response, this study replicated the effectiveness of a Spanish language fotonovela, a form of Entertainment-Education (E-E), designed to increase depression literacy, decrease stigma, and increase help-seeking knowledge and behavior in Latinos. Read More

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December 2013

Evaluation of a fotonovela to increase depression knowledge and reduce stigma among Hispanic adults.

J Immigr Minor Health 2013 Apr;15(2):398-406

Institute for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Research, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, 2001N Soto Street, MC 9239, Los Angeles, CA 90089-9239, USA.

Fotonovelas-small booklets that portray a dramatic story using photographs and captions-represent a powerful health education tool for low-literacy and ethnic minority audiences. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a depression fotonovela in increasing depression knowledge, decreasing stigma, increasing self-efficacy to recognize depression, and increasing intentions to seek treatment, relative to a text pamphlet. Hispanic adults attending a community adult school (N = 157, 47. Read More

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Focus group evaluation of "Secret Feelings": a depression fotonovela for Latinos with limited English proficiency.

Health Promot Pract 2011 Nov 1;12(6):840-7. Epub 2011 Aug 1.

New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA.

In this study, the authors examined reactions of Latino adults with limited English proficiency (LEP) to a culturally and linguistically adapted depression fotonovela, titled "Secret Feelings." Fotonovelas are popular health education tools that use posed photographs, text bubbles with simple text, and dramatic narratives to engage audiences and raise their awareness and knowledge about specific health issues. Four focus groups (N = 32) were conducted at an adult school program (e. Read More

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November 2011

Depression fotonovela: development of a depression literacy tool for Latinos with limited English proficiency.

Health Promot Pract 2012 Nov 4;13(6):747-54. Epub 2010 Nov 4.

Center of Excellence for Cultural Competence, New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive Rm 1715, Unit 11, New York, NY 10032, USA.

Stigma, low health literacy, lack of knowledge, and misconceptions about depression are considered pervasive barriers contributing to the disparities Latino adults with limited English proficiency (LEP) face in accessing and receiving high-quality depression care. The development of culturally and linguistically appropriate health literacy tools, such as fotonovelas, can help address these barriers to depression care in the Latino community. Fotonovelas are booklets that use posed photographs with simple text bubbles to portray soap opera stories that convey educational messages. Read More

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November 2012

Salud de la mujer: using fotonovelas to increase health literacy among Latinas.

Prog Community Health Partnersh 2010 ;4(1):25-30

Medical College of Wisconsin, USA.

Background: There is an identified need for health literacy strategies to be culturally sensitive and linguistically appropriate.

Objectives: The goal of our community-based participatory research (CBPR) project related to health and nutrition is to demonstrate that active community involvement in the creation of health education fotonovelas that are relevant to culture, ethnicity, gender, social class, and language can increase the health literacy of women in a disadvantaged community.

Methods: We recruited 12 women to take part in our pilot fotonovela intervention about healthy eating and nutrition. Read More

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