735 results match your criteria latino migrant


Psychological distress in middle eastern immigrants to the United States: A challenge to the healthy migrant model?

Soc Sci Med 2021 Apr 16;274:113765. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

Professor of Sociology and Research Associate, Center for Demography & Population Health, Florida State University, USA. Electronic address:

Rationale And Objective: Research has documented a robust mental health advantage among Asian and Latino immigrants to the United States relative to the native-born. The current investigation extended this line of research, asking whether Middle Eastern immigrants to the United States enjoy a similar mental health advantage.

Methods: Drawing on pooled cross-sections from the 2007-2018 National Health Interview Surveys, we used OLS regression to examine psychological distress in Middle Eastern immigrants relative to both native-born Whites and immigrants from other global regions. Read More

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Combinatorial Effects of Discrimination, Legal Status Fears, Adverse Childhood Experiences, and Harsh Working Conditions among Latino Migrant Farmworkers: Testing Learned Helplessness Hypotheses.

J Lat Psychol 2020 Aug 23;8(3):179-201. Epub 2019 Sep 23.

Department of Health Promotion, College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center.

Migrant farmwork is often characterized by harsh working conditions that carry significant physical and mental health consequences. Using a learned helplessness framework, the current study examined the extent to which discrimination, immigration legal status difficulties, and adverse childhood experiences moderated the effects of harsh working conditions on depression and anxiety. The study also examined the extent to which harsh working conditions mediated the effects of discrimination, immigration legal status difficulties, and adverse childhood experiences on depression and anxiety. Read More

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Environmental Health Threats to Latino Migrant Farmworkers.

Annu Rev Public Health 2021 04 4;42:257-276. Epub 2021 Jan 4.

Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA; email:

Approximately 75% of farmworkers in the United States are Latino migrants, and about 50% of hired farmworkers do not have authorization to work in the United States. Farmworkers face numerous chemical, physical, and biological threats to their health. The adverse effects of these hazards may be amplified among Latino migrant farmworkers, who are concurrently exposed to various psychosocial stressors. Read More

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Preventing the Spread of COVID-19 in Immigration Detention Centers Requires the Release of Detainees.

Am J Public Health 2021 01 19;111(1):110-115. Epub 2020 Nov 19.

William D. Lopez is with the University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor. Nolan Kline is with the Department of Anthropology, Rollins College, Winter Park, FL. Alana M. W. LeBrón is with the Department of Health, Society, and Behavior and Department of Chicano/Latino Studies, University of California, Irvine. Nicole L. Novak is with the Department of Community and Behavioral Health, University of Iowa College of Public Health, Iowa City. Maria-Elena De Trinidad Young is with the Department of Public Health, School of Social Sciences, Humanities, and Arts, University of California, Merced. Gregg Gonsalves is with Public Health Modeling Unit, Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT. Ranit Mishori is with Physicians for Human Rights, Washington, DC. Basil A. Safi is with the Office of Engagement Initiatives, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. Ian M. Kysel is with the Cornell Law School, Ithaca, NY.

Immigration detention centers are densely populated facilities in which restrictive conditions limit detainees' abilities to engage in social distancing or hygiene practices designed to prevent the spread of COVID-19. With tens of thousands of adults and children in more than 200 immigration detention centers across the United States, immigration detention centers are likely to experience COVID-19 outbreaks and add substantially to the population of those infected.Despite compelling evidence indicating a heightened risk of infection among detainees, state and federal governments have done little to protect the health of detained im-migrants. Read More

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January 2021

Individual and structural barriers to Latin American refugees and asylum seekers' access to primary and mental healthcare in Chile: A qualitative study.

PLoS One 2020 6;15(11):e0241153. Epub 2020 Nov 6.

Programa de Estudios Sociales en Salud, Instituto de Ciencias e Innovación en Medicina (ICIM), Facultad de Medicina Clínica Alemana, Universidad del Desarrollo (UDD), Santiago, Chile.

Background: Since 2010 there has been a growing population of refugees and asylum seekers in Latin America. This study sought to investigate the perceived experiences and healthcare needs of refugees and asylum seekers of Latin American origin in Chile in order to identify main barriers to healthcare and provide guidance on allied challenges for the public healthcare system.

Methods: Descriptive qualitative case study with semi-structured interviews applied to refugees and asylum seekers (n = 8), healthcare workers (n = 4), and members of Non-Governmental Organizations and religious foundations focused on working with refugees and asylum seekers in Chile (n = 2). Read More

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December 2020

Improving Equitable Access to Cervical Cancer Screening and Management.

Am J Nurs 2020 11;120(11):58-67

Lisa Heidi Kiser is a clinical assistant professor at the University of Arizona College of Nursing in Tucson. Judith Butler is an assistant professor at Frontier Nursing University in Lexington, KY. Contact author: Lisa Heidi Kiser, The authors have disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

Background: Each year, 13,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with cervical cancer and 4,000 die from it. Moreover, 8 million women 21 to 65 years of age haven't had a Pap test in five years. Hispanic women have the highest incidence of cervical cancer and are less likely to be screened or return for care. Read More

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November 2020

Hispanic Seasonal Farmworker Caregivers' Beliefs and Perceptions of Early Childhood Caries.

J Dent Hyg 2020 Oct;94(5):14-21

: Children of Hispanic seasonal or migrant farmworkers in the United States (US) experience high rates of Early Childhood Caries (ECC) and have high rates of untreated dental caries. The purpose of this study was to explore Hispanic seasonal farmworker caregivers' beliefs and/or perceptions regarding ECC their children's oral health. A qualitative explanatory model interview approach was used with a purposive sample of Hispanic parents/caregivers, working and residing in Orange and Ulster Counties, New York. Read More

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October 2020

Health screening results of Cubans settling in Texas, USA, 2010-2015: A cross-sectional analysis.

PLoS Med 2020 08 14;17(8):e1003233. Epub 2020 Aug 14.

Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.

Background: Protecting the health of refugees and other migrant populations in the United States is key to ensuring successful resettlement. Therefore, to identify and address health concerns early, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends a domestic medical examination (screening for infectious and noninfectious diseases/conditions) shortly after arrival in the US. However, because refugee/migrant populations often have differing health patterns from one another and the US population, the collection and analysis of health information is key to developing population-specific clinical guidelines to guide the care of resettled individuals. Read More

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Results from brief educational intervention and health screenings: A community health study of Latinos in Southwest Florida.

J Educ Health Promot 2020 30;9:148. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Marieb College of Health & Human Services, Florida Gulf Coast University Fort Myers, FL, USA.

Background: Latinos in the U.S., one of the fastest growing minority population, have low health-related knowledge and higher rates of diabetes and obesity. Read More

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: The Implementation and Reach of an HIV Screening Campaign for Latinx Immigrants.

AIDS Educ Prev 2020 06;32(3):229-242

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Latinxs in the United States are disproportionately affected by HIV and present with more advanced disease than their non-Latinx peers, due to numerous barriers to care including HIV stigma. We describe the adaptation, implementation, and reach of (You Only Live Once), Baltimore's first social marketing campaign promoting HIV screening among Spanish-speaking Latinxs. The 6-month campaign promoted free HIV testing by addressing HIV stigma. Read More

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Developing Adaptando Dieta Y Acción Para Todos (ADAPT): An Intervention to Improve Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors Among Latino Parents and Children Living in Rural Communities.

J Immigr Minor Health 2021 Feb;23(1):88-94

College of Nursing, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA.

Latino migrant farmworkers are at great risk of obesity and its concomitant negative health impacts. Obesity interventions for this underserved, minority population are limited. We expanded upon our prior intervention work in childhood obesity to develop a multi-family, behavioral intervention, ADAPT. Read More

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February 2021

Fatal prescriptions: Immigration detention, mismedication, and the necropolitics of uncare.

Death Stud 2020 11;44(11):699-708. Epub 2020 Jun 11.

Department of Latina/Latino Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA.

This article focuses on detention care and its deadly consequences in the United States. Between October 2003 and October 2019, there were at least 196 deaths in Immigration and Customs Enforcement custody, many the result of grossly inadequate medical practices. Drawing on the case of Juan Carlos Baires, who was denied antiretroviral medication, the essay argues that, rather than being beneficiaries of care, noncitizens in detention are often victims of uncare-of a dearth or absence of both affective (concern about) and practical (providing for) care. Read More

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Using Life History Calendars to Estimate in Utero and Early Life Pesticide Exposure of Latinx Children in Farmworker Families.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 05 16;17(10). Epub 2020 May 16.

Department of Radiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA.

(1) Background: Early life exposure to neurotoxic chemicals can have later impacts on child health. Most research designs must assume that current exposure is similar to past. Life history calendar methods can help to provide data on early life exposure. Read More

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Perceived Role of Built and Social Environments on Childhood Obesity: A PhotoVoice Approach With Latino Migrant Farmworking Families.

Fam Community Health 2020 Jul/Sep;43(3):221-228

Florida State University College of Medicine, Immokalee.

The childhood obesity epidemic in the United States is well documented; however, limited attention has been given to Latino children from migrant farmworking families, and there is little research on how environmental and social factors contribute to overweight among this population. This article presents qualitative themes related to the role of the built and social environments in influencing diet, physical activity, and ultimately, health and weight status. Themes were identified through the PhotoVoice method, with 13 parent participants representing 30 children from a rural farmworking community in Southwest Florida. Read More

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November 2020

Heat-Related Illness Among Latinx Child Farmworkers in North Carolina: A Mixed-Methods Study.

New Solut 2020 08 29;30(2):111-126. Epub 2020 Apr 29.

Department of Family and Community Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, USA.

Children as young as ten are legally hired for farm work. In North Carolina, many of these hired children are Latinx; they often work long hours during hot and humid summer conditions. Heat-related illness occurs along a continuum of severity ranging from heat cramps and rashes to heat exhaustion and heat stroke, which can be fatal. Read More

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A Structural-Environmental Model of Alcohol and Substance-Related Sexual HIV Risk in Latino Migrant Day Laborers.

AIDS Behav 2020 Nov;24(11):3176-3191

Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.

A structural-environmental model of alcohol and substance-related sexual HIV risk in 344 Latino migrant day laborers, participants in a cross-sectional survey, is tested using structural equation modeling. Hypothesized pathways include: (1) direct paths between environmental conditions and both distress related risk factors, and cultural and community protective factors; (2) indirect paths between environmental conditions and distress through cultural and community protective factors; and (3) indirect paths between environmental conditions and sexual risk through both distress risk factors and cultural and community protective factors. As hypothesized, the environmental factors, discrimination and working conditions, were indirectly related to sexual risk through the distress related factor, problem drinking, and through the protective factor, contact with family in country of origin. Read More

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November 2020

Self-reported factors associated with dental care utilization among Hispanic migrant farmworkers in South Florida.

J Public Health Dent 2020 09 17;80(3):186-193. Epub 2020 Apr 17.

Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA.

Objectives: To explore patterns of dental care utilization among adult Hispanic migrant farmworkers utilizing the Andersen Behavioral Model of Health Services.

Methods: In 2010, 278 Hispanic migrant workers participated in the oral health assessment. Hierarchical logistic regression modeling was used to assess the effects of multiple factors on having a past-year dental visit. Read More

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September 2020

Deportation of Family Members of US-Citizen Latinos and Misuse of Prescription Drugs: United States, 2019.

Authors:
Miguel Pinedo

Am J Public Health 2020 04 20;110(4):560-566. Epub 2020 Feb 20.

Miguel Pinedo is with the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, College of Education, University of Texas, Austin.

To investigate how personally knowing a deported migrant relates to past-year prescription drug misuse among US-citizen Latinos. Between April and May 2019, a national sample (n = 3446) was recruited to complete an online survey. Multivariate and multinomial logistic regression models examined the role of (1) personally knowing a deported migrant and (2) the relationship to the deportee (e. Read More

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Diet quality and dental caries in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

J Public Health Dent 2020 06 7;80(2):140-149. Epub 2020 Feb 7.

Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center, Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

Objectives: Fermentable carbohydrate is universally recognized as the major dietary risk factor for dental caries. We assessed the broader relationship between diet quality and dental caries in a diverse Latinx adult population.

Methods: In a cross-sectional probability sample, 14,517 dentate men and women in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) received a dental examination and completed two 24-hours dietary recalls and a food propensity questionnaire. Read More

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Health Profile and Health Care Access of Mexican Migration Flows Traversing the Northern Border of Mexico.

Med Care 2020 05;58(5):474-482

Border Health Commission, Mexico Section, Tijuana, BC, Mexico.

Background: The health of Latino migrants is most often studied with samples of immigrants settled in the United States or returned migrants in Mexico. We examine health outcomes and health care access of Mexican migrants traversing the Mexican border region to gain a better understanding of migrant health needs as they transition between migration phases.

Methods: We used data from a 2013 probability survey of migrants from Northbound and Southbound migration flows in Tijuana, Mexico (N=2412). Read More

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A Cross-sectional Study of Gender-related Differences in Reporting Fatigue and Pain among Latino/A Migrant Farmworkers.

J Agromedicine 2020 07 15;25(3):319-329. Epub 2020 Jan 15.

Department of Health Promotion, College of Public Health, 984365 Nebraska Medical Center, University of Nebraska Medical Center , Omaha, NE, USA.

: Migrant farmworkers face many hardships in both their working and living environments including dangerous and demanding tasks, long hours, and inadequate rest. This study sought to explore gender differences in the reporting of fatigue and pain and to identify predictors of fatigue and pain among migrant farmworkers in Nebraska (n = 241). : Bivariate tests were used to assess associations among study variables. Read More

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Health and Occupational Injury Experienced by Latinx Child Farmworkers in North Carolina, USA.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2019 12 30;17(1). Epub 2019 Dec 30.

Department of Family and Community Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA.

Children as young as 10 years old are hired to work on farms in the United States (U.S.). Read More

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December 2019

Access barriers to genetic services for Spanish-speaking families in states with rapidly growing migrant populations.

J Genet Couns 2020 06 12;29(3):365-380. Epub 2019 Dec 12.

Department of Genetic Counseling, College of Health Professions, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA.

Hispanics are among the fastest growing U.S. population segments, accounting for the majority of growth since 2000. Read More

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Recent Research on Occupational Animal Exposures and Health Risks: A Narrative Review.

Curr Environ Health Rep 2019 12;6(4):236-246

Department of Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health, 715 Albany St, Boston, MA, 02118, USA.

Purpose Of Review: In the last year, an increasing number of studies have reported on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission in Africa and Asia and in migrant workers. We reviewed original research on occupational health and safety of animal workers published from January 1, 2018, through June 30, 2019, with a targeted focus on infectious disease studies published in these populations.

Recent Findings: Studies focused on occupational exposures to infectious agents, dust and allergens, pesticides, and occupational injury. Read More

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December 2019

Aging and Migration: the Value of Familism for Spanish Speakers.

J Cross Cult Gerontol 2020 Mar;35(1):99-109

School of Languages and Cultures, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.

This study investigates the caregiving expectations of a group of nineteen older Spanish speakers living in Australia from the perspective of familism. Speakers participated in audio-recorded interviews about their caregiving expectations late in life and four key themes were identified: (1) tension between value of familism and the self-reliance approach encouraged in Australian society; (2) fear of burdening their "westernized" children, which resulted in shifted care expectations; (3) fear of ending up in an aged care facility; and (4) the importance of religion in coping with uncertainty about future care arrangements. Read More

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The Mental Health Implications of Living in the Shadows: The Lived Experience and Coping Strategies of Undocumented African Migrant Women.

Behav Sci (Basel) 2019 Nov 26;9(12). Epub 2019 Nov 26.

College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201, USA.

In the United States, undocumented immigrants often encounter complex challenges that impact their emotional well-being. Existing literature has primarily focused on Latino immigrants. Thus, little is known about the mental health needs of undocumented African immigrant women. Read More

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November 2019

Nativity, Neighborhoods, and Body Composition in the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging.

Gerontologist 2020 02;60(2):239-249

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, California.

Background And Objectives: Globally, obesity influences the risk of many major chronic diseases. Our study examines the association between individual nativity and neighborhood level concentration of immigrants with 10-year changes in weight, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC) among older Latinos.

Research Design And Methods: The Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging (SALSA) is a population-based prospective study of community-dwelling older adults of Mexican origin (baseline ages 58-101 years). Read More

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February 2020

The impact of deportation policies on the substance using behaviors of US-citizen Latinos.

Authors:
Miguel Pinedo

Int J Drug Policy 2020 01 20;75:102605. Epub 2019 Nov 20.

Department of Kinesiology & Health Education, College of Education, University of Texas, Austin, 2109 San Jacinto Blvd., Stop D3700, Austin, TX 78712, United States. Electronic address:

Background: Scant data has found that the deportation of a migrant family member has adverse health consequences for their US-citizen family members. However, no study has investigated how the detention or deportations of others (e.g. Read More

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January 2020

Cardiovascular disease risk factors among Latino farmworkers in Oregon.

Ann Epidemiol 2019 12 16;40:8-12.e1. Epub 2019 Oct 16.

¡Salud! Services, Tuality Healthcare, Hillsboro, OR.

Purpose: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are a leading cause of death among Latinos in the United States. The present study examines the prevalence of four CVD risk factors (diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and obesity) in a large sample of Latino farmworkers in Oregon.

Methods: We pooled secondary, cross-sectional data from Latino vineyard and winery farmworkers (n = 3382), in the north Willamette valley, Oregon, between 2004 and 2012. Read More

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December 2019

Diagnosed and Undiagnosed Diabetes among Agricultural Workers in California.

J Health Care Poor Underserved 2019 ;30(4):1289-1301

Latino agricultural workers in California are a vulnerable population at risk for many undiagnosed health concerns. Principal among them is diabetes, and the prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes is difficult to estimate. In a convenience sample of 579 agricultural workers recruited through the California Heat Illness Prevention Study (CHIPS), we found HbA1c levels consistent with diabetes in 54 participants, of whom 33 (61. Read More

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