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Chromosome segregation during female meiosis in C. elegans: A tale of pushing and pulling.

J Cell Biol 2020 12;219(12)

Centre for Gene Regulation and Expression, School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK.

The role of the kinetochore during meiotic chromosome segregation in C. elegans oocytes has been a matter of controversy. Danlasky et al. Read More

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December 2020

Evidence for anaphase pulling forces during C. elegans meiosis.

J Cell Biol 2020 12;219(12)

Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA.

Anaphase chromosome movement is thought to be mediated by pulling forces generated by end-on attachment of microtubules to the outer face of kinetochores. However, it has been suggested that during C. elegans female meiosis, anaphase is mediated by a kinetochore-independent pushing mechanism with microtubules only attached to the inner face of segregating chromosomes. Read More

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December 2020

A conserved protein network controls assembly of the outer kinetochore and its ability to sustain tension.

Genes Dev 2004 Sep;18(18):2255-68

Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, La Jolla, California 92093, USA.

Kinetochores play an essential role in chromosome segregation by forming dynamic connections with spindle microtubules. Here, we identify a set of 10 copurifying kinetochore proteins from Caenorhabditis elegans, seven of which were previously uncharacterized. Using in vivo assays to monitor chromosome segregation, kinetochore assembly, and the mechanical stability of chromosome-microtubule attachments, we show that this copurifying protein network plays a central role at the kinetochore-microtubule interface. Read More

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September 2004
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