5 results match your criteria iplan flow

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Evaluation of a patient-specific algorithm for predicting distribution for convection-enhanced drug delivery into the brainstem of patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

J Neurosurg Pediatr 2021 May 14:1-9. Epub 2021 May 14.

2Department of Neurological Surgery, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York.

Objective: With increasing use of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of drugs, the need for software that can predict infusion distribution has grown. In the context of a phase I clinical trial for pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), CED was used to administer an anti-B7H3 radiolabeled monoclonal antibody, iodine-124-labeled omburtamab. In this study, the authors retrospectively evaluated a software algorithm (iPlan Flow) for the estimation of infusate distribution based on the planned catheter trajectory, infusion parameters, and patient-specific MRI. Read More

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Repeat convection-enhanced delivery for diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

J Neurosurg Pediatr 2020 Sep 25:1-6. Epub 2020 Sep 25.

1Department of Neurological Surgery, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York.

Objective: While the safety and efficacy of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) have been studied in patients receiving single-dose drug infusions, agents for oncological therapy may require repeated or chronic infusions to maintain therapeutic drug concentrations. Repeat and chronic CED infusions have rarely been described for oncological purposes. Currently available CED devices are not approved for extended indwelling use, and the only potential at this time is for sequential treatments through multiple procedures. Read More

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September 2020

Deformational changes after convection-enhanced delivery in the pediatric brainstem.

Neurosurg Focus 2020 01;48(1):E3

1Department of Neurological Surgery, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York.

Objective: In the brainstem, there are concerns regarding volumetric alterations following convection-enhanced delivery (CED). The relationship between distribution volume and infusion volume is predictably greater than one. Whether this translates into deformational changes and influences clinical management is unknown. Read More

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January 2020

Influence of an intratumoral cyst on drug distribution by convection-enhanced delivery: case report.

J Neurosurg Pediatr 2017 Sep 7;20(3):256-260. Epub 2017 Jul 7.

Department of Neurological Surgery, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medicine.

Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) uses positive pressure to induce convective flow of molecules and maximize drug distribution. Concerns have been raised about the effect of cystic structures on uniform drug distribution with CED. The authors describe the case of a patient with a diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) with a large cyst and examine its effect on drug distribution after CED with a radiolabeled antibody. Read More

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September 2017

Poor drug distribution as a possible explanation for the results of the PRECISE trial.

J Neurosurg 2010 Aug;113(2):301-9

Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.

Object: Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is a novel intracerebral drug delivery technique with considerable promise for delivering therapeutic agents throughout the CNS. Despite this promise, Phase III clinical trials employing CED have failed to meet clinical end points. Although this may be due to inactive agents or a failure to rigorously validate drug targets, the authors have previously demonstrated that catheter positioning plays a major role in drug distribution using this technique. Read More

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