3 results match your criteria clarified fahr's

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Just "one of so many"? The pathologist Theodor Fahr (1877-1945) and his ambivalent relationship to National Socialism.

Pathol Res Pract 2021 Aug 23;224:153488. Epub 2021 May 23.

Institute for History, Theory and Ethics in Medicine, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen University, Wendlingweg 2, Aachen, D-52074, Germany. Electronic address:

Theodor Fahr is well known as a pioneer in renal pathology and the eponym of "Fahr's disease". While his professional merits are undisputed, his relationship to National Socialism remains unclear. On the one hand, he signed the public "oath of allegiance" of German professors to Adolf Hitler, on the other hand, he appeared as a mentor to his Jewish colleague Paul Kimmelstiel. Read More

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The type III transporters (PiT-1 and PiT-2) are the major sodium-dependent phosphate transporters in the mice and human brains.

Brain Res 2016 Apr 26;1637:128-136. Epub 2016 Feb 26.

Laboratory of Medical Therapeutics and Molecular Therapeutics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu, Japan. Electronic address:

PiT-1/SLC20A1 and PiT-2/SLC20A2 are members of the mammalian type-III inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporters encoded by the SLC20 genes. The broad distribution of SLC20A1 and SLC20A2 mRNAs in mammalian tissues is compatible with housekeeping maintenance of intracellular Pi homeostasis by transporting Pi from intrastitial fluid for normal cellular functions. Recently, mutations of SLC20A2 have been found in patients with idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (IBGC), also known as Fahr's disease. Read More

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Localization of type-III sodium-dependent phosphate transporter 2 in the mouse brain.

Brain Res 2013 Sep 30;1531:75-83. Epub 2013 Jul 30.

Laboratory of Medical Therapeutics and Molecular Therapeutics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu, Japan.

Type-III sodium-dependent phosphate transporters 1 and 2 (PiT-1 and PiT-2, respectively) are proteins encoded by SLC20A1 and SLC20A2, respectively. The ubiquitous distribution of PiT-1 and PiT-2 mRNAs in mammalian tissues is in agreement with the housekeeping maintenance of homeostasis of intracellular inorganic phosphate (Pi), which is absorbed from interstitial fluid for normal cellular functions. Recently, mutations of SLC20A2 have been found in patients with idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (IBGC), also known as Fahr's disease. Read More

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September 2013
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