19 results match your criteria ana3

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Superresolution characterization of core centriole architecture.

J Cell Biol 2021 Apr;220(4)

State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing, China.

The centrosome is the main microtubule-organizing center in animal cells. It comprises of two centrioles and the surrounding pericentriolar material. Protein organization at the outer layer of the centriole and outward has been studied extensively; however, an overall picture of the protein architecture at the centriole core has been missing. Read More

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Anastral Spindle 3/Rotatin Stabilizes Sol narae and Promotes Cell Survival in .

Mol Cells 2021 Jan;44(1):13-25

Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 34141, Korea.

Apoptosis and compensatory proliferation, two intertwined cellular processes essential for both development and adult homeostasis, are often initiated by the mis-regulation of centrosomal proteins, damaged DNA, and defects in mitosis. Fly Anastral spindle 3 (Ana3) is a member of the pericentriolar matrix proteins and known as a key component of centriolar cohesion and basal body formation. We report here that is a suppressor of lethality induced by the overexpression of Sol narae (Sona), a metalloprotease in a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motif (ADAMTS) family. Read More

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January 2021

Tissue specific requirement of Drosophila Rcd4 for centriole duplication and ciliogenesis.

J Cell Biol 2020 09;219(8)

Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.

Rcd4 is a poorly characterized Drosophila centriole component whose mammalian counterpart, PPP1R35, is suggested to function in centriole elongation and conversion to centrosomes. Here, we show that rcd4 mutants exhibit fewer centrioles, aberrant mitoses, and reduced basal bodies in sensory organs. Rcd4 interacts with the C-terminal part of Ana3, which loads onto the procentriole during interphase, ahead of Rcd4 and before mitosis. Read More

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September 2020

Effect of Chitosan Dispersion and Microparticles on Older Biofilms.

Molecules 2019 May 10;24(9). Epub 2019 May 10.

Department of Physics and Chemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto 14040-903, São Paulo, Brazil.

(1) Background: The effectiveness of chitosan to improve the action of antimicrobial compounds against planktonic bacteria and young biofilms has been widely investigated in Dentistry, where the biofilm lifecycle is a determining factor for the success of antibacterial treatment. In the present study, mature biofilms were treated with chitosan dispersion (CD) or chitosan microparticles (CM). (2) Methods: CD at 0. Read More

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Effect of an Experimental Formulation Containing Chlorhexidine on Pathogenic Biofilms and Drug Release Behavior in the Presence or Absence of Bacteria.

Pharmaceutics 2019 Feb 19;11(2). Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Department of Physics and Chemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, CEP 14040-903, São Paulo, Brazil.

(1) Background: For any antibacterial oral formulation to be successful, it must present effects in the presence of biofilms. Therefore, our aim is to analyze the drug release and the antibiofilm effects of a semi-solid formulation containing chlorhexidine (CHX) in the presence of pathogenic biofilms. (2) Methods: The biofilms of ( = 6) or ( = 3) were formed for 6 and 4 days, respectively, being exposed to: 1) a CHX system or 2) vehicle control without CHX. Read More

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February 2019

NanoSIMS imaging of extracellular electron transport processes during microbial iron(III) reduction.

FEMS Microbiol Ecol 2018 08;94(8)

Williamson Research Centre, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK.

Microbial iron(III) reduction can have a profound effect on the fate of contaminants in natural and engineered environments. Different mechanisms of extracellular electron transport are used by Geobacter and Shewanella spp. to reduce insoluble Fe(III) minerals. Read More

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Ferritin Assembly in Enterocytes of Drosophila melanogaster.

Int J Mol Sci 2016 Feb 5;17(2):27. Epub 2016 Feb 5.

Department of Physiology, Biophysics and Neuroscience, Cinvestav del IPN, Avenida IPN 2508, Zacatenco, Mexico City 07360, Mexico.

Ferritins are protein nanocages that accumulate inside their cavity thousands of oxidized iron atoms bound to oxygen and phosphates. Both characteristic types of eukaryotic ferritin subunits are present in secreted ferritins from insects, but here dimers between Ferritin 1 Heavy Chain Homolog (Fer1HCH) and Ferritin 2 Light Chain Homolog (Fer2LCH) are further stabilized by disulfide-bridge in the 24-subunit complex. We addressed ferritin assembly and iron loading in vivo using novel transgenic strains of Drosophila melanogaster. Read More

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February 2016

RTTN mutations link primary cilia function to organization of the human cerebral cortex.

Am J Hum Genet 2012 Sep 30;91(3):533-40. Epub 2012 Aug 30.

Department of Clinical Genetics, Erasmus University Medical Center (Erasmus MC), P.O. Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Polymicrogyria is a malformation of the developing cerebral cortex caused by abnormal organization and characterized by many small gyri and fusion of the outer molecular layer. We have identified autosomal-recessive mutations in RTTN, encoding Rotatin, in individuals with bilateral diffuse polymicrogyria from two separate families. Rotatin determines early embryonic axial rotation, as well as anteroposterior and dorsoventral patterning in the mouse. Read More

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September 2012

mRNA export and the TREX complex.

Authors:
Jun Katahira

Biochim Biophys Acta 2012 Jun 8;1819(6):507-13. Epub 2011 Dec 8.

Biomolecular Networks Laboratories, Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, Japan.

Over the past few decades, we have learned that eukaryotes have evolved sophisticated means to coordinate the nuclear export of mRNAs with different steps of gene expression. This functional orchestration is important for the maintenance of the efficiency and fidelity of gene expression processes. The TREX (TRanscription-EXport) complex is an evolutionarily conserved multiprotein complex that plays a major role in the functional coupling of different steps during mRNA biogenesis, including mRNA transcription, processing, decay, and nuclear export. Read More

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Ana3 is a conserved protein required for the structural integrity of centrioles and basal bodies.

J Cell Biol 2009 Nov 26;187(3):355-63. Epub 2009 Oct 26.

The Gurdon Institute, Cambridge CB2 1QN, England, UK.

Recent studies have identified a conserved "core" of proteins that are required for centriole duplication. A small number of additional proteins have recently been identified as potential duplication factors, but it is unclear whether any of these proteins are components of the core duplication machinery. In this study, we investigate the function of one of these proteins, Drosophila melanogaster Ana3. Read More

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November 2009

Cholecystokinin and substance P immunoreactive projections to the paraventricular thalamic nucleus in the rat.

Authors:
Kazuyoshi Otake

Neurosci Res 2005 Apr 15;51(4):383-94. Epub 2005 Jan 15.

Section of Neuroanatomy, Department of Systems Neuroscience, Division of Cognitive and Behavioral Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan.

Cholecystokinin (CCK) and substance P (SP) are thought to play an important role in a variety of stress responses. Both CCK- and SP-positive fibers innervating the thalamus are found principally in the midline nuclei, including the paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT), which has strong reciprocal connections with the medial prefrontal cortex. In the present study, we determined the source of the CCK- and SP-immunoreactive fibers to the PVT, employing combination of retrograde neuronal tracing and immunohistochemistry in the rat. Read More

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Forebrain neurons with collateral projections to both the interstitial nucleus of the posterior limb of the anterior commissure and the nucleus of the solitary tract in the rat.

Authors:
K Otake Y Nakamura

Neuroscience 2003 ;119(3):623-8

Section of Neuroanatomy, Department of Systems Neuroscience, Division of Cognitive and Behavioral Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, , Tokyo, 113-8519, Japan.

The interstitial nucleus of the posterior limb of the anterior commissure (IPAC) receives inputs from several autonomic/limbic regions in the forebrain, including the agranular insular cortex, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the amygdaloid complex, and the lateral hypothalamic area. We sought to identify the distribution of afferent sources to the IPAC and to determine whether these IPAC projection fibers issue collaterals to the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), the principal relay of primary visceral afferents. Two fluorescent tracers, FluoroGold and FluoroRed, were centered stereotaxically on the IPAC and the NTS on chloral hydrate-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Read More

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September 2003

Fos expression in afferents to the rat midline thalamus following immobilization stress.

Neurosci Res 2002 Jul;43(3):269-82

Section of Neuroanatomy, Department of Systems Neuroscience, Division of Cognitive and Behavioral Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, Yushima 1-5-45, Bunkyo-ku, Japan.

The paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT), the most dorsal component of the thalamic midline, is known to be strongly activated following a variety of stressors and thus might be suggested to play a role as a relay for stress-related information targeted for viscerolimbic areas in the brain. This thalamic midline nucleus, however, lacks significant direct connections with the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH), which is a key player in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis whose activation and subsequent glucocorticoid secretion are clearly crucial for homeostasis under 'stressful' conditions. The present study was designed to identify afferents of the PVT, which are activated by an immobilization stress, one type of the 'neurogenic' stress paradigms, using combined Fos immunohistochemistry and retrograde tracing experiments with cholera toxin B subunit. Read More

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Immunohistochemical localization of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase beta in the rat central nervous system.

Neurosci Res 2001 Feb;39(2):175-88

Section of Neuroanatomy, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Research, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8519, Tokyo, Japan.

We examined regional and intracellular distribution of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase beta (CaM-KK beta), which activated Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I and IV (CaM-K I and IV) immunohistochemically in the central nervous system of the rat by light and electron microscopy. Although most neurons in the brain and spinal cord exhibited the immunoreactivity, no labeled neurons were observed in the globus pallidus or entopeduncular nucleus, and only a small number of neurons showed weak immunoreactivity in the substantia nigra pars reticulata. In general, the immunoreactivity was observed both in the cytoplasm and cellular nucleus, although the immunoreactivity was not found in the cellular nucleus in some large neurons such as in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus, lateral vestibular nucleus or gigant cellular reticular formation. Read More

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February 2001

Morphology of pulmonary rapidly adapting receptor relay neurons in the rat.

J Comp Neurol 2001 Feb;430(4):458-70

Section of Neuroanatomy, Department of Systems Neuroscience, Division of Cognitive and Behavioral Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, Tokyo 113-8510, Japan.

The term rapidly adapting pulmonary stretch receptor (RAR) refers to one of the major pulmonary sensory receptors that responds to inflation and deflation of the lungs as well as to irritant stimuli with rapidly adapting irregular discharges. The functional role and central pathways are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate morphological characteristics of second-order neurons (RAR cells) activated by vagal afferent fibers originating from RARs. Read More

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February 2001

Possible pathways through which neurons of the shell of the nucleus accumbens influence the outflow of the core of the nucleus accumbens.

Authors:
K Otake Y Nakamura

Brain Dev 2000 Sep;22 Suppl 1:S17-26

Section of Neuroanatomy, Department of Systems Neuroscience, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, Yushima 1-5-45, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8519, Tokyo, Japan.

The nucleus accumbens (Acb), a major sector of the ventral striatum, is considered to be an integral part of the striatal complex. The Acb has been shown to be composed of two subdivisions, core and shell, which are distinguishable in several aspects, suggesting that these two subdivisions play different functional roles. The aim of this study was to identify pathways of the efferents of the shell of the Acb to influence the outflow of the core of the Acb. Read More

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September 2000

Immunohistochemical study of the distribution of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase in the rat central nervous system.

Brain Res Mol Brain Res 2000 Apr;77(1):76-94

Section of Neuroanatomy, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Research, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.

Distribution of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaM-K Pase) which dephosphorylate multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaM-kinases) in the rat brain and spinal cord were examined immunohistochemically by using an antibody against this enzyme. CaM-K Pase was localized only in the cytoplasm as has been investigated in PC 12 cells, and was never observed in the nucleus. Immunostainability varied from cell group to cell group. Read More

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Serial electron microscopic reconstruction of axon terminals on physiologically identified thalamocortical neurons in the cat ventral lateral nucleus.

J Comp Neurol 1997 Dec;388(4):613-31

Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan.

The distribution of different types of terminals on different portions of single thalamocortical neurons (TCNs) was quantitatively investigated in the cat ventral lateral nucleus (VL) by the application of computer-assisted three-dimensional reconstruction from serial ultrathin sections. Single neurons in the VL were intracellularly penetrated with a glass micropipette filled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and were electrophysiologically identified as TCNs by their antidromic responses to stimulation of the motor cortex. These TCNs received monosynaptic excitation from the contralateral cerebellum. Read More

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December 1997

Characterization of the effects produced by neurokinins and three agonists selective for neurokinin receptor subtypes in a spinal nociceptive reflex of the rat.

Life Sci 1988 ;42(13):1295-305

Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Québec, Canada.

In the awake restrained rat the intrathecal (i.th.) administration of 6. Read More

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