35 results match your criteria acidification beech


Bacteria but not fungi respond to soil acidification rapidly and consistently in both a spruce and beech forest.

FEMS Microbiol Ecol 2020 10;96(10)

Czech Geological Survey, Department of Environmental Geochemistry and Biogeochemistry, Geologická 6, Prague 5, 152 00, Czech Republic.

Anthropogenically enhanced atmospheric sulphur (S) and nitrogen (N) deposition has acidified and eutrophied forest ecosystems worldwide. However, both S and N mechanisms have an impact on microbial communities and the consequences for microbially driven soil functioning differ. We conducted a two-forest stand (Norway spruce and European beech) field experiment involving acidification (sulphuric acid addition) and N (ammonium nitrate) loading and their combination. Read More

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October 2020

Reconstructing Soil Recovery from Acid Rain in Beech () Stands of the Vienna Woods as Indicated by Removal of Stemflow and Dendrochemistry.

Water Air Soil Pollut 2019 22;230(2):30. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

1Department of Forest- and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Ecology, University of Natural Resources and Live Sciences (BOKU), Peter Jordan-Straße 82, 1190 Vienna, Austria.

Our goal was to reconstruct soil recovery from Acid Rain based upon removal of stemflow at beech () stands of known historic and recent soil status. Fourteen beech stands in the Vienna Woods were selected in 1984 and again in 2012 to study changes in soil and foliar chemistry over time. A part of those stands had been strip cut, and to assess reversibility of soil acidification, we analyzed soils around beech stumps from different years of felling, representing the years when acidic stemflow ceased to affect the soil. Read More

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January 2019

Semi-continuous mono-digestion of OFMSW and Co-digestion of OFMSW with beech sawdust: Assessment of the maximum operational total solid content.

J Environ Manage 2019 Feb 5;231:1293-1302. Epub 2018 Oct 5.

Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, University of Cassino and Southern Lazio, via Di Biasio 43, 03043 Cassino, FR, Italy.

In this study, mono-digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and co-digestion of OFMSW with beech sawdust, simulating green waste, were used to investigate the maximum operational total solid (TS) content in semi-continuous high-solids anaerobic digestion (HS-AD). To alleviate substrate overloading in HS-AD, the effluent mass was relatively reduced compared to the influent mass, extending the mass retention time. To this aim, the reactor mass was daily evaluated, permitting to assess the reactor content removal by biogas production. Read More

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February 2019

Comparison of the impacts of acid and nitrogen additions on carbon fluxes in European conifer and broadleaf forests.

Environ Pollut 2018 Jul 6;238:884-893. Epub 2018 Apr 6.

Department of Ecosystem Biology, Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, Branišovská 31, 37005 České Budějovice, Czech Republic.

Increased reactive nitrogen (N) loadings to terrestrial ecosystems are believed to have positive effects on ecosystem carbon (C) sequestration. Global "hot spots" of N deposition are often associated with currently or formerly high deposition of sulphur (S); C fluxes in these regions might therefore not be responding solely to N loading, and could be undergoing transient change as S inputs change. In a four-year, two-forest stand (mature Norway spruce and European beech) replicated field experiment involving acidity manipulation (sulphuric acid addition), N addition (NHNO) and combined treatments, we tested the extent to which altered soil solution acidity or/and soil N availability affected the concentration of soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC), soil respiration (Rs), microbial community characteristics (respiration, biomass, fungi and bacteria abundances) and enzyme activity. Read More

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Microbial communities with distinct denitrification potential in spruce and beech soils differing in nitrate leaching.

Sci Rep 2017 08 29;7(1):9738. Epub 2017 Aug 29.

Czech Geological Survey, Department of Environmental Geochemistry and Biogeochemistry, Prague, 118 21, Czech Republic.

Nitrogen leaching owing to elevated acid deposition remains the main ecosystem threat worldwide. We aimed to contribute to the understanding of the highly variable nitrate losses observed in Europe after acid deposition retreat. Our study proceeded in adjacent beech and spruce forests undergoing acidification recovery and differing in nitrate leaching. Read More

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Fractionation of sulfur (S) in beech () forest soils in relation to distance from the stem base as useful tool for modeling S biogeochemistry.

Model Earth Syst Environ 2017 Sep 9;3(3):1065-1079. Epub 2017 Aug 9.

Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Ecology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Peter-Jordan-Strasse 82, 1190 Vienna, Austria.

The investigation of the fractionation of S compounds in forest soils is a powerful tool for interpreting S dynamics and S biogeochemistry in forest ecosystems. Beech stands on high pH (nutrient-rich) sites on Flysch and on low pH (nutrient-poor) sites on Molasse were selected for testing the influence of stemflow, which represents a high input of water and dissolved elements to the soil, on spatial patterns of sulfur (S) fractions. Soil cores were taken at six distances from a beech stem per site at 55 cm uphill and at 27, 55, 100, 150 and 300 cm downhill from the stem. Read More

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September 2017

Land-use and fire drive temporal patterns of soil solution chemistry and nutrient fluxes.

Sci Total Environ 2017 Dec 30;605-606:514-526. Epub 2017 Jun 30.

Department of Soil Science, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Löbdergraben 32, 07743 Jena, Germany.

Land-use type and ecosystem disturbances are important drivers for element cycling and bear the potential to modulate soil processes and hence ecosystem functions. To better understand the effect of such drivers on the magnitude and temporal patterns of organic matter (OM) and associated nutrient fluxes in soils, continuous flux monitoring is indispensable but insufficiently studied yet. We conducted a field study to elucidate the impact of land-use and surface fires on OM and nutrient fluxes with soil solution regarding seasonal and temporal patterns analyzing short (<3months) and medium-term (3-12months) effects. Read More

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December 2017

Predicting recovery from acid rain using the micro-spatial heterogeneity of soil columns downhill the infiltration zone of beech stemflow: introduction of a hypothesis.

Model Earth Syst Environ 2016;2:154. Epub 2016 Aug 13.

Department of Forest- and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Ecology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Peter-Jordan-Strasse 82, 1190 Vienna, Austria.

Release of stored sulfur may delay the recovery of soil pH from Acid Rain. It is hypothesized that analyzing the micro-spatial heterogeneity of soil columns downhill of a beech stem enables predictions of soil recovery as a function of historic acid loads and time. We demonstrated in a very simplified approach, how these two different factors may be untangled from each other using synthetic data. Read More

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A slight recovery of soils from Acid Rain over the last three decades is not reflected in the macro nutrition of beech (Fagus sylvatica) at 97 forest stands of the Vienna Woods.

Environ Pollut 2016 Sep 22;216:624-635. Epub 2016 Jun 22.

Department of Forest- and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Ecology, University of Natural Resources and Live Sciences (BOKU), Peter Jordan-Straße 82, 1190 Vienna, Austria.

Rigorous studies of recovery from soil acidification are rare. Hence, we resampled 97 old-growth beech stands in the Vienna Woods. This study exploits an extensive data set of soil (infiltration zone of stemflow and between trees area at different soil depths) and foliar chemistry from three decades ago. Read More

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September 2016

Modeled effects of soil acidification on long-term ecological and economic outcomes for managed forests in the Adirondack region (USA).

Sci Total Environ 2016 Sep 12;565:401-411. Epub 2016 May 12.

U.S. Geological Survey, New York Water Science Cente, Troy, NY 12180, United States.

Sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is among the most ecologically and economically important tree species in North America, and its growth and regeneration is often the focus of silvicultural practices in northern hardwood forests. A key stressor for sugar maple (SM) is acid rain, which depletes base cations from poorly-buffered forest soils and has been associated with much lower SM vigor, growth, and recruitment. However, the potential interactions between forest management and soil acidification - and their implications for the sustainability of SM and its economic and cultural benefits - have not been investigated. Read More

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September 2016

The variations of aluminium species in mountainous forest soils and its implications to soil acidification.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2015 Nov 19;22(21):16676-87. Epub 2015 Jun 19.

Department of Soil Science and Soil Protection, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, Prague, Czech Republic.

Aluminium (Al) speciation is a characteristic that can be used as a tool for describing the soil acidification process. The question that was answered is how tree species (beech vs spruce) and type of soil horizon affect Al speciation. Our hypotesis is that spruce and beech forest vegetation are able to modify the chemical characteristics of organic horizon, hence the content of Al species. Read More

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November 2015

Tree species affect cation exchange capacity (CEC) and cation binding properties of organic matter in acid forest soils.

Sci Total Environ 2015 Apr 14;511:655-62. Epub 2015 Jan 14.

Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Aas, Norway.

Soil organic matter (SOM) in forest soil is of major importance for cation binding and acid buffering, but its characteristics may differ among soils under different tree species. We investigated acidity, cation exchange properties and Al bonding to SOM in stands of Scots pine, pedunculate oak, Norway spruce, European beech and common hornbeam in southern Poland. The content of total carbon (Ct) was by far the major contributor to total cation exchange capacity (CECt) even in loamy soils and a strong relationship between Ct and CECt was found. Read More

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Modeling stomatal conductance and ozone uptake of Fagus crenata grown under different nitrogen loads.

Environ Pollut 2014 Jan 15;184:481-7. Epub 2013 Oct 15.

The United Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan.

A multiplicative stomatal conductance model was constructed to estimate stomatal O3 uptake of Fagus crenata exposed to O3 under different N loads to the soil. Our stomatal conductance model included environmental functions such as the stomatal responses of F. crenata to diurnal changes, chronic O3 stress (AOT0), acute O3 stress (O3 concentration), and nitrogen load to soil. Read More

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January 2014

Profile distribution and temporal changes of sulphate and nitrate contents and related soil properties under beech and spruce forests.

Sci Total Environ 2013 Jan 22;442:165-71. Epub 2012 Nov 22.

Department of Soil Science and Soil Protection, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, 165 21 Prague 6, Czech Republic.

The behaviour of principal inorganic anions in forest soils, originating mainly from acid deposition, strongly influences the forest ecosystem response on acidification. The aim of this study was to describe seasonal and temporal changes of sulphate and nitrate contents and related soil properties under beech and spruce forests in a region heavily impacted by acidification. The Jizera Mountains area (Czech Republic) was chosen as such a representative mountainous soil ecosystem. Read More

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January 2013

Platelet-derived growth factor maintains stored calcium through a nonclustering Orai1 mechanism but evokes clustering if the endoplasmic reticulum is stressed by store depletion.

Circ Res 2012 Jun 3;111(1):66-76. Epub 2012 May 3.

Multidisciplinary Cardiovascular Research Centre, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, United Kingdom.

Rationale: Calcium entry through Orai1 channels drives vascular smooth muscle cell migration and neointimal hyperplasia. The channels are activated by the important growth factor platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Channel activation is suggested to depend on store depletion, which redistributes and clusters stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1), which then coclusters and activates Orai1. Read More

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Long-term patterns in soil acidification due to pollution in forests of the Eastern Sudetes Mountains.

Environ Pollut 2011 Oct 20;159(10):2586-93. Epub 2011 Jul 20.

Department of Vegetation Ecology, Institute of Botany, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Lidická 25/27, CZ-602 00 Brno, Czech Republic.

Soil acidification was assessed in the Eastern Sudetes Mountains (Czech Republic) between 1941 and 2003, i.e. before and after the period of major industrial pollution (1950s-1990s). Read More

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October 2011

Liming in a beech forest results in more mineral elements stored in the mantle of Lactarius subdulcis ectomycorrhizas.

Fungal Biol 2010 Nov-Dec;114(11-12):1007-14. Epub 2010 Oct 12.

Department of Microbial Ecology, Lund University, Ecology Building, SE-223 62 Lund, Sweden.

Liming is a forest practice used to counteract forest decline induced by soil acidification. It consists of direct Ca and Mg input in forest soil and restores tree mineral nutrition, but also causes drastic changes in nutrient availability in soil. Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi significantly contribute in nutrient uptake by trees, and can recover them through organic acid secretion or through enzymatic degradation of organic matter. Read More

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February 2011

Effects of liming on potential oxalate secretion and iron chelation of beech ectomycorrhizal root tips.

Microb Ecol 2010 Aug 25;60(2):331-9. Epub 2010 Jun 25.

Department of Microbial Ecology, Lund University, Ecology Building, 223 62 Lund, Sweden.

Liming is used to counteract forest decline induced by soil acidification. It consists of Ca and Mg input to forest soil and not only restores tree mineral nutrition but also modifies the availability of nutrients in soil. Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi are involved in mineral nutrient uptake by trees and can recover them through dissolution of mineral surface. Read More

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Mechanism of antibacterial activity of the white-rot fungus Hypholoma fasciculare colonizing wood.

Can J Microbiol 2010 May;56(5):380-8

Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Department of Microbial Ecology, Boterhoeksestraat 48, Heteren 6666 GA, Netherlands.

In a previous study it was shown that the number of wood-inhabiting bacteria was drastically reduced after colonization of beech (Fagus sylvatica) wood blocks by the white-rot fungus Hypholoma fasciculare, or sulfur tuft (Folman et al. 2008). Here we report on the mechanisms of this fungal-induced antibacterial activity. Read More

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Assessment of soil aluminium pools along three mountainous elevation gradients.

J Inorg Biochem 2009 Nov 15;103(11):1449-58. Epub 2009 Aug 15.

Department of Soil Science and Soil Protection, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences in Prague, Suchdol, Czech Republic.

Anthropogenic soil acidification in mountain forests and consequent Al release still present a significant problem in many regions. The effect of deposition may differ according to stand conditions, including altitude. This contribution is focused on three elevation transects, two in the Jizera Mountains strongly influenced by acid deposition, one in the less affected Novohradske Mountains. Read More

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November 2009

Does forest liming impact the enzymatic profiles of ectomycorrhizal communities through specialized fungal symbionts?

Mycorrhiza 2009 Sep 7;19(7):493-500. Epub 2009 May 7.

INRA Nancy, Laboratoire Interactions Arbres-Microorganismes, Route d'Amance, 54280, Champenoux, France.

Liming (Ca-Mg soil amendment) is a forestry practice used to correct soil acidification and restore health and productivity in declining stands. Liming is known to modify tree mineral nutrition beyond the sole Ca and Mg. We hypothesized that liming also modifies the very functioning of the tree absorbing system (that is the ectomycorrhizal fine roots) in a way that facilitates the mobilization of mineral nutrients, particularly those entrapped in soil organic matter. Read More

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September 2009

Experimental research on recolonisation with Anemone nemorosa of the beech forests of the Ruhr district (Germany) floristically impoverished by air pollution.

Authors:
Rüdiger Wittig

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2008 Sep;15(6):492-8

Department of Ecology and Geobotany, Institute of Ecology, Evolution and Diversity, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Siesmayerstr. 70, 60323, Frankfurt a.M., Germany.

Background, Aim, And Scope: High SO(2) concentrations as have been observed over decades in the Ruhr district lead to a remarkable reduction of leaf area in the majority of the characteristic broad-leafed herbs of the Central European beech forests even after only a few months of experimental fumigation. Thus, it is no wonder in the time of high SO(2) pollution, e.g. Read More

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September 2008

Elevated aluminium concentration in acidified headwater streams lowers aquatic hyphomycete diversity and impairs leaf-litter breakdown.

Microb Ecol 2008 Aug 17;56(2):260-9. Epub 2008 Jan 17.

Laboratoire Interactions Ecotoxicité, Biodiversité, Ecosystèmes, UMR CNRS 7146, Université Paul Verlaine-Metz, Délestraint, 57070, Metz, France.

Aquatic hyphomycetes play an essential role in the decomposition of allochthonous organic matter which is a fundamental process driving the functioning of forested headwater streams. We studied the effect of anthropogenic acidification on aquatic hyphomycetes associated with decaying leaves of Fagus sylvatica in six forested headwater streams (pH range, 4.3-7. Read More

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Forest vegetation monitoring and foliar chemistry of red spruce and red maple at Acadia National Park in Maine.

Environ Monit Assess 2007 Mar 16;126(1-3):27-37. Epub 2006 Dec 16.

University of Maine, 5755 Nutting Hall, Orono, Maine 04469, USA.

The USDA Forest Service Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) program indicators, including forest mensuration, crown condition classification, and damage and mortality indicators were used in the Cadillac Brook and Hadlock Brook watershed forests at Acadia National Park (ANP) along coastal Maine. Cadillac Brook watershed burned in a wildfire in 1947. Hadlock Brook watershed, undisturbed for several centuries, serves as the reference site. Read More

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Effect of different land use on soil erosion in the pre-alpine fringe (North-East Italy): Ion budget and sediment yield.

Sci Total Environ 2006 Oct 12;369(1-3):433-40. Epub 2006 Jul 12.

Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Venice, Dorsoduro, 2137 30123, Venezia, Italy.

Data concerning ion budget from rainfall, runoff and soil loss measurements from two experimental plots located in North-East Italy, under different land cover (beech forest and vineyard, respectively), are reported. The chemical composition of rainfall, soil solution and runoff was determined to study the solute cycle within the soil, and the relationships between water, soil and vegetation. The forest ecosystem is more prone to acidification than the agricultural one; the elemental concentration of runoff water is considerably lower than that of soil solution. Read More

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October 2006

Factors controlling spatial distribution of soil acidification and Al forms in forest soils.

J Inorg Biochem 2005 Sep;99(9):1796-806

Department of Soil Science and Geology, Czech University of Agriculture in Prague, Kamycka 129, 165 21 Prague 6--Suchdol, Czech Republic.

Soil acidification and Al release in forest soils is controlled by a number of factors, like acid deposition, forest type, parent rock, altitude, etc. This paper studies the principal stand factors affecting spatial distribution of the content of KCl-extractable Al (Al(KCl), mainly exchangeable), Na4P2O7-extractable Al (Al(Na4P2O7), mainly organically bound), and other soil characteristics related to acidification in surface organic (O) and subsurface mineral (B) horizons in the Jizera Mountains region. Geostatistical methods were exploited. Read More

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September 2005

Tree species (Picea abies and Fagus sylvatica) effects on soil water acidification and aluminium chemistry at sites subjected to long-term acidification in the Ore Mts., Czech Republic.

J Inorg Biochem 2005 Sep;99(9):1822-9

Czech Geological Survey, Department of Environmental Geochemistry and Biogeochemistry, Klarov 3, 118 21 Prague, Czech Republic.

The effect of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) on acid deposition and soil water chemistry was studied at a site in the Ore Mts., Czech Republic, that has been subjected to decades of elevated acidic deposition. Dry deposition onto the spruce canopy significantly increased acid input to the soil in comparison to the beech canopy. Read More

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September 2005

Fine roots in stands of Fagus sylvatica and Picea abies along a gradient of soil acidification.

Environ Pollut 2005 Oct;137(3):574-9

Institute for Applied Plant Biology, Sandgrubenstrasse 25/27, 4124 Schönenbuch, Switzerland.

Root length of naturally grown young beech trees (Fagus sylvatica L.) was investigated in 26 forest plots of differing base saturation and nitrogen deposition. The relative length of finest roots (<0. Read More

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October 2005

Atmospheric input of elements to forest ecosystems: a method of estimation using artificial foliage placed above rain collectors.

Environ Pollut 2000 Nov;110(2):345-56

Department of Plant Ecology, Institute of Ecology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Dziekanów Leśny near Warsaw, 05-092 Łomianki, Poland.

Usefulness of a method of artificial foliage was tested for estimation of total ionic inputs from the atmosphere to forest ecosystems, as well as of processes relevant to ionic fluxes through tree canopies: uptake, leaching, passive flow. The studies were performed in Norway spruce and European beech stands in Karkonosze Mountains (Poland), in 1995-97. Artificial leaves of increasing leaf area index: 0, 2, 6 and 12 m(2) m(-2 )were placed above standard rain collectors. Read More

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November 2000

Effects of stream acidification on fungal biomass in decaying beech leaves and leaf palatability.

Authors:
O Dangles E Chauvet

Water Res 2003 Feb;37(3):533-8

Faculté des Sciences & Techniques, Institut de Recherche en Biologie de l'Insecte, IRBI UMR CNRS 6035, Avenue-Monge-Parc de Grandmont, F-37200 Tours, France.

We examined the effect of surface water acidification on rates of decomposition, ergosterol concentrations (as a measure of fungal biomass), and palatability to shredders of common beech leaves (Fagus sylvatica L.) in five mountain streams (pH 4.7-7. Read More

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February 2003