241 results match your criteria Tumors of the Conus and Cauda Equina


Tumor Occupancy Ratio-An Imaging Characteristic Prognosticating the Surgical Outcome of Benign Intradural Extramedullary Spinal Cord Tumors.

Int J Spine Surg 2021 Jun 7;15(3):570-576. Epub 2021 May 7.

Department of Neurosurgery, Vivekananda Polyclinic and Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India.

Background: Intradural extramedullary (IDEM) spinal cord tumors are two thirds of all spinal tumors. We have prospectively analyzed the importance of the tumor occupancy ratio as a factor for predicting the course of the disease and in prognosticating the surgical outcome in patients with IDEM tumors.

Methods: We prospectively analyzed 44 consecutive cases of IDEM tumors, diagnosed as cervical, thoracic, and lumbar IDEM tumors (excluding conus/cauda equina lesion) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that were operated on at our institution between 2014 and 2016. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Efficacy of intraoperative bulbocavernosus reflex monitoring for the prediction of postoperative voiding function in adult patients with lumbosacral spinal tumor.

J Clin Monit Comput 2021 Mar 8. Epub 2021 Mar 8.

Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 82, Gumi-ro 173 Beon-gil, Bundang-Gu, Seongnam-Si, Geonggi-Do, Republic of Korea.

Lumbosacral spinal tumor surgery is associated with a relatively high risk of postoperative voiding dysfunction. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between intraoperative bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR) changes and postoperative voiding function in adult patients with lumbosacral spinal tumors. We retrospectively reviewed 63 patients who underwent intradural conus and cauda equina tumor surgeries with intraoperative BCR monitoring. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Lumbar Laminoplasty for Resection of Myxopapillary Ependymoma of the Conus Medullaris: 2-Dimensional Operative Video.

Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown) 2021 Apr;20(5):E352

Department of Neurosurgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

Myxopapillary ependymomas are slow-growing tumors that are located almost exclusively in the region of the conus medullaris, cauda equina, and filum terminale of the spinal cord. Surgical intervention achieving a gross total resection is the main treatment modality. If, however, a gross total resection cannot be achieved, surgery is augmented with radiation therapy. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Two cases of normal pressure hydrocephalus caused by ependymoma of the cauda equina.

Surg Neurol Int 2021 5;12. Epub 2021 Jan 5.

Department of Spinal Surgery, Kameda Medical Center, Kamogawa-Shi, Chiba, Japan.

Background: Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) associated with tumors of the cauda equina is rare. Here, we report two cases of NPH attributed to cauda equina ependymomas.

Case Description: A 63-year-old male presented with progressive gait disturbance, dementia, and urinary incontinence. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
January 2021

Metastatic myxopapillary ependymoma treated with immunotherapy achieving durable response.

BMJ Case Rep 2020 Dec 17;13(12). Epub 2020 Dec 17.

Medical Oncology, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Myxopapillary ependymoma (MPE) is a rare glial tumour mainly located in the areas of the conus medullaris, cauda equina and filum terminale of the spinal cord. Ectopic MPE tends to behave more aggressively and distant metastases are often seen. Unfortunately, no standard treatment options are established as only small series of treated patients and a few reported cases are available in the literature. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
December 2020

Atypical Imaging of Hemorrhagic Lumbosacral Myxopapillary Ependymoma with Histopathological Correlation: A Case Report.

Am J Case Rep 2020 Oct 21;21:e925449. Epub 2020 Oct 21.

Neurosurgery Division, Surgery Department, King Saud University Medical City (KSUMC), College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

BACKGROUND Spinal myxopapillary ependymoma (MPE) is a slow-growing tumor arising from ependymal cells of the central nervous system. MPE rarely presents with acute neurological compromise and most commonly occur in the filum terminale or conus medullaris region. To date, only a few cases have been reported of patients presenting acutely because of hemorrhagic MPE. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

Microsurgical resection of giant T11/T12 conus cauda equina schwannoma.

Bosn J Basic Med Sci 2020 10 14. Epub 2020 Oct 14.

Semmes Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Memphis, TN, United States

In this video, we highlight the anatomy involved with microsurgical resection of a giant T11/T12 conus cauda equina schwannoma. Spinal schwannoma remains the third most common intradural spinal tumor. Tumors undergoing gross total resection usually do not recur. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2020

[Clinical study of 21 cases of sacral cysts containing fila terminale].

Beijing Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban 2020 Jun;52(3):582-585

Department of Neurosurgery, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191, China.

Objective: To summarize the characteristics of sacral cysts containing fila terminale and to explore the surgical treatment methods.

Methods: The clinical features, imaging characteristics and surgical methods of 21 cases of sacral cysts containing fila terminale from July 2010 to March 2017 were reviewed and analyzed. Lumbosacral and perineal pain, weakness of the lower limbs and bladder and bowel dysfunction were the common clinical symptoms. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Tailored therapy: Surgical and radiosurgical treatment for two distinct myxopapillary ependymomas in the same patient. A case report.

J Clin Neurosci 2020 Jul 20;77:237-239. Epub 2020 May 20.

Department of Neurosurgery, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milan, Italy.

Myxopapillary ependymomas are low grade neoplasms, which originate mostly from the medullary conus, cauda equina and the filum terminale. To date the principal treatment is surgical, total- or subtotal removal (GTR or STR), which can be associated with adjuvant radiotherapy. We report a patient with two tumor locations, one larger tumor at the L3 to S1 level and a smaller S2-S3 localized lesion. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Intramedullary-Extramedullary Breast Metastasis to the Caudal Neuraxis Two Decades after Primary Diagnosis: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

World Neurosurg 2020 08 11;140:26-31. Epub 2020 May 11.

Department of Neurosurgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Background: Intramedullary metastases to the caudal neuraxis with exophytic extension to the extramedullary space are rare. We describe the unique case of a patient with locally recurrent breast cancer who developed an intramedullary-extramedullary metastasis to the conus medullaris and cauda equina 22 years after primary diagnosis, the longest interval between primary breast cancer and intramedullary spread to date. We also reviewed the published literature on focal breast metastases to the conus medullaris or cauda equina. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Sacral Extradural Angiolipoma Associated with Tight Filum Terminale and Spina Bifida Coexisting with Spinal Arteriovenous Fistula.

World Neurosurg 2020 08 11;140:37-45. Epub 2020 May 11.

Department of Radiology, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand.

Background: Spinal arteriovenous fistula (AVF) may rarely associate with spinal dysraphism, that is, tethered spinal cord and spinal intradural lipoma. Spinal extradural angiolipoma coexisting with spinal AVF has not been reported in the literature. We reported an extremely rare case of sacral angiolipoma associated with tight filum terminale and sacral spina bifida coexisting with spinal AVF within this tumor. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Filum Terminale Ependymoma in an Infant with Meningocele.

Pediatr Neurosurg 2020 21;55(1):46-50. Epub 2020 Jan 21.

Department of Neurological Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.

This report describes a case of an ependymoma found in the setting of tethered cord syndrome. We present a 3-month-old girl with prenatal diagnosis of lumbar meningocele who later underwent tethered cord release. After birth, she was neurologically intact and only found to have a skin-covered meningocele. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
November 2020

Natural reduction in acute intratumoral hemorrhage of spinal schwannoma in the cauda equina.

Nagoya J Med Sci 2019 Nov;81(4):701-705

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.

A 58-year-old woman presented with acute pain in her back and her left leg. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an intradural schwannoma with an intratumoral hemorrhage between the lower L4 vertebra and L5/S1 disk level. A follow-up MRI after one month revealed that the tumor had regressed from the middle of L5 to the L5/S1 disk level. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
November 2019

Iatrogenic Lumbar Arachnoid Cyst Fenestration for Tethered Cord: 2-Dimensional Operative Video.

World Neurosurg 2020 Mar 12;135:130. Epub 2019 Dec 12.

Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL.

Iatrogenic lumbar arachnoid cysts are a rare occurrence after intradural surgery. To our knowledge, there is only 1 other previous case reported in the literature contributing to a symptomatic tethered cord. We present a surgical video (Video 1) demonstrating the history, preoperative workup, and operative technique for exploration and fenestration of a symptomatic iatrogenic lumbar arachnoid cyst with a tethered cord. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Intraoperative Neuromonitoring in Surgery of Cauda Equina and Conus Medullaris Tumors.

Turk Neurosurg 2019 ;29(6):909-914

Istanbul University-Cerrahpasa, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Istanbul, Turkey.

Aim: To demonstrate the value of special intraoperative neuromonitoring techniques for cauda equina and conus medullaris tumors (CECMT) by describing standard methods used at our center.

Material And Methods: Neurophysiological records were retrospectively reviewed for 16 patients (eight females and eight males; age range: 27â€"60 years) who underwent surgery for CECMT at our department between 2016 and 2018.

Results: Motor and/or sensorial deficits were preoperatively identified in 10 patients; no patients had bladder or sexual dysfunction. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
February 2020

Gangliocytic Paraganglioma of Dorsolumbar Spine: A Rare Tumor at Rare Site.

Asian J Neurosurg 2019 Jul-Sep;14(3):907-910

Department of Pathology, Mamata Medical College, Khammam, Telangana, India.

Spinal paragangliomas are rare benign tumors. The gangliocytic paragangliomas (GP) of spine are even rarer. The GPs are almost exclusively seen in duodenum. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
September 2019

[Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system caused by myxopapillary ependymoma of conus medullaris and cauda equine: a case report and literature review].

Beijing Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban 2019 Aug;51(4):769-774

Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Bengbu Medical College, Bengbu 233004, Anhui, China.

Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system (SSCNS) is a rare disorder caused by hemosiderin deposits in the subpial layers of the brain and spinal cord due to prolonged or recurrent low-grade bleeding into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Central nervous system tumor could be one of the sources of bleeding. Some problems exist at present regarding the diagnosis and treatment of SSCNS in China. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Intraoperative Triggered Electromyography Recordings from the External Urethral Sphincter Muscles During Spine Surgeries.

Cureus 2019 Jun 10;11(6):e4867. Epub 2019 Jun 10.

Neurosurgery, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, SAU.

Introduction: Bowel and bladder function are at risk during tumor resection and other surgeries of the conus, cauda equina, and nerve roots. This study demonstrates the ability to acquire triggered electromyography (t-EMG) from the external urethral sphincter (EUS) muscles by utilizing a urethral catheter with an electrode attached.

Methods: A retrospective analysis of neurophysiological monitoring data from two medical centers was performed. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Resection of Myxopapillary Ependymoma of the Filum Terminale: 2-Dimensional Operative Video.

Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown) 2020 Feb;18(2):E40

Surgical Neurology Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

We present the case of a 48-yr-old female who presented with persistent thigh pain and was found to have a heterogeneous mass caudal to the conus most consistent with a myxopapillary ependymoma. We performed L2-3 laminectomies for tumor resection. For this procedure, we used intraoperative ultrasound as well as neuromonitoring. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
February 2020

Motor Evoked Potential Recordings from the Urethral Sphincter Muscles (USMEPs) during Spine Surgeries.

Neurodiagn J 2019 ;59(1):34-44

g Department of Neurosurgery University of Texas Health Science Center , San Antonio , Texas.

Bowel and bladder function are at risk during tumor resection of the conus, cauda equina, and nerve roots. This study demonstrates the ability to acquire transcranial electrical motor evoked potentials (TCeMEPs) from the urethral sphincter muscles (USMEPs) by utilizing a urethral catheter with an embedded electrode. A retrospective analysis of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) data from nine intradural tumors, four tethered cord releases, and two spinal stenosis procedures was performed (n = 15). Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
December 2019

Natural Course of Myxopapillary Ependymoma: Unusual Case Report and Review of Literature.

World Neurosurg 2019 Jan 12;121:239-242. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

Craniospinal Surgery Center, Ankara, Turkey.

Background: Spinal cord ependymomas are the most frequent primary intramedullary tumors of the cord in middle age (40-60 years of age). Myxopapillary ependymomas are low-incidence tumors and occur in the cauda equina and conus medullaris. They are typically described as fleshy, sausage-shaped, vascular lesions. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
January 2019

West Nile Neuroinvasive Disease Presenting as Elsberg Syndrome.

Neurologist 2018 Sep;23(5):152-154

Division of Critical Care Neurology.

Introduction: Elsberg syndrome (ES) is a rarely recognized cause of cauda equina syndrome and lower thoracic myelitis, mainly linked to reactivation, or occasionally primary, infection with herpes simplex virus type 2. West Nile virus neuroinvasive disease is rarely considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with ES.

Case Report: A 63-year-old man with pancreatic cancer in remission and polymyalgia rheumatica on low-dose prednisone presented with a 10-day history of low-back pain and a viral-type illness with low-grade fever, nausea, and vomiting. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
September 2018

Caudal cell mass developmental aberrations: an imaging approach.

Clin Imaging 2018 Nov - Dec;52:216-225. Epub 2018 Jul 21.

University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.

The objective of this review is to describe antenatal and postnatal imaging criteria, which allow diagnosis and aid workup, prognostication and treatment of developmental anomalies of the caudal cell mass. The lower spinal cord (conus medullaris), filum terminale and inferior lumbar and sacral nerve roots develop from the caudal cell mass, a remnant of the embryologic primitive streak composed of undifferentiated pluripotential cells. Anomalous caudal cell mass development can manifest as tight filum terminale, caudal dysgenesis, terminal myelocystocele, anterior sacral meningocele or sacrococcygeal teratoma. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
January 2019

Sporadic NF2 Mosaic: Multiple spinal schwannomas presenting with severe, intractable pain following pregnancy.

Interdiscip Neurosurg 2017 Dec;10:142-145

Department of Neurological Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States.

The aim of the present paper is to report undiagnosed sporadic neurofibromatosis type 2 presenting with symptomatic compressive spinal tumors following pregnancy. A 36-year-old woman experienced progressive, severe lumbar radicular pain in the second trimester of pregnancy which became intractable soon after delivery. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a complex heterogeneous hypointense mass lesion around the conus. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
December 2017

An unusual cause of combined cauda equina and conus medullaris syndrome.

Neurol India 2018 May-Jun;66(3):886-888

Department of Spine Surgery, VPS Lakeshore Hospital, Ernakulam, Kerala, India.

View Article and Full-Text PDF
September 2019

A quintessential syndrome with a rare marvelling aetiology: Rosai-Dorfman disease presenting as Conus-Cauda syndrome.

BMJ Case Rep 2018 Feb 17;2018. Epub 2018 Feb 17.

Department of Internal Medicine, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

A 19-year-old woman presented with a history of severe lower backache and asymmetric proximal lower limb weakness during the past 3 months. In addition, she also suffered from lower motor neuron-type bladder and bowel symptoms. On examination, paraparesis was noted. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
February 2018

Unusual cauda equina syndrome due to multifocal ependymoma infiltrated by lymphoma.

J Spine Surg 2017 Dec;3(4):697-701

Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Nice, Hôpital Pasteur, Nice, France.

Myxopapillary ependymoma is a rare tumour of the central nervous system (CNS); this subtype of ependymoma occurs most frequently in cauda equina, conus medullaris or filum terminale. The treatment consists of complete removal of the tumour including its capsule when possible since it is usually a solitary lesion. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the CNS is found in only 1. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
December 2017

Surgical Treatment of Spinal Ependymomas: Experience in 49 Patients.

World Neurosurg 2018 Mar 5;111:e703-e709. Epub 2018 Jan 5.

Department of Neurosurgery, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; Department of Neurosurgery, Cologne Merheim Hospital, University of Witten/Herdecke, Cologne, Germany.

Background: Ependymomas are rare central nervous system tumors. Local tumor distribution in the central nervous system depends on age: among adults, ependymomas occur mostly in the spinal cord, whereas among children, intracranial manifestations are more common. To date, there are no prospective studies about treatment strategies for ependymomas. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF