4,063 results match your criteria Tularemia


A survey on endoparasites in wild rodents of the Jaz Murian depression and adjacent areas, southeast of Iran.

J Parasit Dis 2018 Dec 13;42(4):589-597. Epub 2018 Oct 13.

Department of Plant Protection, Faculty of Agriculture, Higher Educational Complex of Saravan, Saravan, Iran.

In this survey, rodents and their endoparasites were investigated in the Jaz Murian depression and adjacent areas, southeast Iran. In total, 146 specimens of rodents belong to 13 species were trapped. In general, 10 different genera of endoparasites including 11 species were collected. Read More

View Article
December 2018

Evaluation of an outbred mouse model for Francisella tularensis vaccine development and testing.

PLoS One 2018 11;13(12):e0207587. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

Department of Immunology & Microbial Disease, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY, United States of America.

Francisella tularensis (Ft) is a biothreat agent for which there is no FDA-approved human vaccine. Currently, there are substantial efforts underway to develop both vaccines and the tools to assess these vaccines. Tularemia laboratory research has historically relied primarily upon a small number of inbred mouse strains, but the utility of such findings to outbred animals may be limited. Read More

View Article
December 2018

A case of ulceroglandular tularemia presenting with lymphadenopathy and an ulcer on a linear morphoea lesion surrounded by erysipelas.

Int Med Case Rep J 2018 12;11:313-318. Epub 2018 Nov 12.

Department of Infectious Diseases, Regional Hospital of Bellinzona e Valli, 6500 Bellinzona, Ticino, Switzerland.

Tularemia is a zoonosis caused by the infection of (a gram-negative aerobic bacterium). Transmission to other animals or humans usually occurs through insect or tick bites, direct contact with a contaminated environment (mud or water), infected animals - mainly lagomorphs - or by ingesting undercooked meat or inhaling contaminated dust (hay or soil). This paper discusses the case of a 32-year-old man, who came to our Emergency Room presenting with persistent fever, inguinal lymphadenopathy, and an ulcer on his left lower limb on a linear morphoea lesion that had been there for some time. Read More

View Article
November 2018
1 Read

Francisella tularensis Exposure Among National Park Service Employees During an Epizootic: Devils Tower National Monument, Wyoming, 2015.

Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 2018 Dec 1. Epub 2018 Dec 1.

4 Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , Fort Collins, Colorado.

Introduction: Tularemia is a zoonotic infection caused by the highly infectious bacterium Francisella tularensis. Persons having outdoor professions are more likely than others to be exposed to F. tularensis through increased contact with arthropods, infected animals, and contaminated aerosols. Read More

View Article
December 2018
1 Read

First Case of Tularemia Reported in Portugal: Probably of Imported Origin.

Front Public Health 2018 19;6:325. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

Internal Medicine Service 4, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central, Santa Marta Hospital, Lisbon, Portugal.

The authors report the case of a 47-year-old man who walked in the countryside on the island of Bornholm, during the summer period. Three days later, fever, myalgias and adynamia began. The serological tests, Real-time PCR and isolation of the bacteria from the culture of lymph biopsy confirmed the presence of subsp. Read More

View Article
November 2018
1 Read

A case report of human tularemia from Iran.

Iran J Microbiol 2018 Aug;10(4):250-253

National Reference Laboratory for Plague, Tularemia and Q Fever, Research Centre for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Akanlu, Kabudar Ahang, Hamadan, Iran.

Tularemia is one of the most contagious bacterial infections. Here, we report a human case of glandular tularemia in Iran following the first report in 1980. The patient was a 6-year-old girl who had consumed a hunted hare in Kurdistan Province in western Iran. Read More

View Article
August 2018
1 Read

Nanoparticle formulation of moxifloxacin and intramuscular route of delivery improve antibiotic pharmacokinetics and treatment of pneumonic tularemia in a mouse model.

ACS Infect Dis 2018 Nov 27. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

Francisella tularensis causes a serious and often fatal infection, tularemia. We compared the efficacy of moxifloxacin formulated as free drug vs. disulfide snap-top mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) in a mouse model of pneumonic tularemia. Read More

View Article
November 2018
1 Read

Detection of Francisella tularensis in three vole species in Central Europe.

Transbound Emerg Dis 2018 Nov 17. Epub 2018 Nov 17.

Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Institute of Novel and Emerging Infectious Diseases Greifswald - Insel Riems, Germany.

Francisella tularensis is a zoonotic, gram-negative bacterium that causes tularemia in humans. Depending on its subspecies and the route of transmission, mild to lethal courses have been reported. F. Read More

View Article
November 2018
3 Reads

Aerosol prime-boost vaccination provides strong protection in outbred rabbits against virulent type A Francisella tularensis.

PLoS One 2018 22;13(10):e0205928. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

Center for Vaccine Research, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States of America.

Tularemia, also known as rabbit fever, is a severe zoonotic disease in humans caused by the gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis (Ft). While there have been a number of attempts to develop a vaccine for Ft, few candidates have advanced beyond experiments in inbred mice. We report here that a prime-boost strategy with aerosol delivery of recombinant live attenuated candidate Ft S4ΔaroD offers significant protection (83% survival) in an outbred animal model, New Zealand White rabbits, against aerosol challenge with 248 cfu (11 LD50) of virulent type A Ft SCHU S4. Read More

View Article
October 2018
5 Reads

Current Status of Tick-Borne Diseases in South Korea.

Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 2018 Oct 17. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

1 Department of Internal Medicine and Inha University School of Medicine , Incheon, Republic of Korea.

Background: Bites with tick-borne pathogens can cause various bacterial, viral, or parasitic diseases in humans. Tick-transmitted diseases are known as contributing factors to the increasing incidence and burden of diseases. The present article investigated the epidemiology of tick-borne diseases in South Korea. Read More

View Article
October 2018
2 Reads

Human infectious diseases and the changing climate in the Arctic.

Environ Int 2018 Dec 11;121(Pt 1):703-713. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

Arctic Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland; Thule Institute, University of Arctic, University of Oulu, Finland.

Climatic factors, especially temperature, precipitation, and humidity play an important role in disease transmission. As the Arctic changes at an unprecedented rate due to climate change, understanding how climatic factors and climate change affect infectious disease rates is important for minimizing human and economic costs. The purpose of this systematic review was to compile recent studies in the field and compare the results to a previously published review. Read More

View Article
December 2018
6 Reads

Babesia conradae infection in coyote hunting dogs infected with multiple blood-borne pathogens.

J Vet Intern Med 2018 Sep 11;32(5):1609-1617. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, California.

Background: Babesia conradae is an intraerythrocytic piroplasm infecting dogs in the southern United States. Ticks have been suspected, but unproven, as vectors. We identified B. Read More

View Article
September 2018
3 Reads

Protection induced by a Francisella tularensis subunit vaccine delivered by glucan particles.

PLoS One 2018 8;13(10):e0200213. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

CBR Division, Dstl Porton Down, Salisbury, United Kingdom.

Francisella tularensis is an intracellular pathogen causing the disease tularemia, and an organism of concern to biodefence. There is no licensed vaccine available. Subunit approaches have failed to induce protection, which requires both humoral and cellular immune memory responses, and have been hampered by a lack of understanding as to which antigens are immunoprotective. Read More

View Article
October 2018
11 Reads

RECENT CHANGES IN INFECTIOUS DISEASES IN EUROPEAN WILDLIFE.

J Wildl Dis 2018 Oct 4. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

3   National Veterinary Institute (SVA), SE75189 Uppsala, Sweden.

Many infectious diseases originating from, or carried by, wildlife affect wildlife conservation and biodiversity, livestock health, or human health. We provide an update on changes in the epidemiology of 25 selected infectious, wildlife-related diseases in Europe (from 2010-16) that had an impact, or may have a future impact, on the health of wildlife, livestock, and humans. These pathogens were selected based on their: 1) identification in recent Europe-wide projects as important surveillance targets, 2) inclusion in European Union legislation as pathogens requiring obligatory surveillance, 3) presence in recent literature on wildlife-related diseases in Europe since 2010, 4) inclusion in key pathogen lists released by the Office International des Epizooties, 5) identification in conference presentations and informal discussions on a group email list by a European network of wildlife disease scientists from the European Wildlife Disease Association, or 6) identification as pathogens with changes in their epidemiology during 2010-16. Read More

View Article
October 2018
8 Reads

Structural and functional studies of the metalloregulator Fur identify a promoter-binding mechanism and its role in virulence.

Commun Biol 2018 17;1:93. Epub 2018 Jul 17.

Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, CEA, BIG-LCBM, 38000 Grenoble, France.

is a Gram-negative bacterium causing tularaemia. Classified as possible bioterrorism agent, it may be transmitted to humans via animal infection or inhalation leading to severe pneumonia. Its virulence is related to iron homeostasis involving siderophore biosynthesis directly controlled at the transcription level by the ferric uptake regulator Fur, as presented here together with the first crystal structure of the tetrameric Fur in the presence of its physiological cofactor, Fe. Read More

View Article
July 2018
1 Read

Tularemia transmission to humans: a multifaceted surveillance approach.

Epidemiol Infect 2018 Dec 25;146(16):2139-2145. Epub 2018 Sep 25.

Department of Molecular Epidemiology,National Centre for Disease Control and Public Health,Tbilisi,Georgia.

Tularemia has sustained seroprevalence in Eurasia, with estimates as high as 15% in endemic regions. The purpose of this report is to characterise the current epidemiology of Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica in Georgia. Three surveillance activities are summarised: (1) acute infections captured in Georgia's notifiable disease surveillance system, (2) infectious disease seroprevalence study of military volunteers, and (3) a study of seroprevalence and risk factors in endemic regions. Read More

View Article
December 2018
4 Reads

Mobilizable Plasmids for Tunable Gene Expression in .

Front Cell Infect Microbiol 2018 31;8:284. Epub 2018 Aug 31.

Biozentrum, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

is the causative agent of the life-threatening disease tularemia. However, the molecular tools to study are limited. Especially, expression plasmids are sparse and difficult to use, as they are unstable and prone to spontaneous loss. Read More

View Article
August 2018
5 Reads

[Painful lymphadenopathy after an insect bite-a case report].

Hautarzt 2018 Sep 18. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Dermatologische Klinik, UniversitätsSpital Zürich, Gloriastr. 31, 8091, Zürich, Schweiz.

Tularemia is a bacterial zoonosis which is commonly transmitted through tick or insect bites or contact with meat of infected animals. We report the case of a 36-year-old man who developed fever, chills, headaches, and a painful, unilateral, inguinal lymphadenopathy with a red-livid skin discoloration after an insect bite on his abdomen. Ulceroglandular tularemia was diagnosed through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and serology. Read More

View Article
September 2018
9 Reads

Tetracyclines for Treatment of Tularemia: A Case Series.

Open Forum Infect Dis 2018 Sep 3;5(9):ofy176. Epub 2018 Sep 3.

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine.

Tetracyclines for tularemia have been associated with higher failure rates. There were 48 cases of tularemia at the University of Missouri between 1988 and 2015. We retrospectively analyzed 17 patients with tularemia who were successfully treated with tetracyclines, and 9 of these patients also underwent aspiration or incision and drainage. Read More

View Article
September 2018
18 Reads

Glandular Tularemia.

N Engl J Med 2018 Sep;379(10):967

Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO.

View Article
September 2018
5 Reads

Francisella tularensis bacteraemia causing multi-organ failure.

Oxf Med Case Reports 2018 Sep 25;2018(9):omy067. Epub 2018 Aug 25.

Section for Endocrinology, Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.

Tularemia is a zoonosis caused by the gram-negative coccobacillus . The bacterium can be transmitted in several ways including direct contact with animal reservoirs, ingestion, inhalation and bites, and typical clinical symptoms are headache, fever, diarrhea and dyspnea. has two predominant subspecies (ssp), namely ssp. Read More

View Article
September 2018
2 Reads

From Squirrels to Biological Weapons: The Early History of Tularemia.

Authors:
J V Hirschmann

Am J Med Sci 2018 Oct 15;356(4):319-328. Epub 2018 Jun 15.

Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. Electronic address:

After George McCoy accidentally discovered a new infection in 1911 while investigating bubonic plague in squirrels, he transmitted the disease to experimental animals and isolated the causative organism. He called it Bacterium tularense, after Tulare County, California. In 1919, Edward Francis determined that an infection called "deer-fly fever" was the same disease, naming it "tularemia. Read More

View Article
October 2018
8 Reads

Sequence comparison of Francisella tularensis LVS, LVS-G and LVS-R.

Pathog Dis 2018 Oct 1;76(7). Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Laboratory of Mucosal Pathogens and Cellular Immunology, Division of Bacterial, Parasitic and Allergenic Products, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration.

Francisella tularensis is a gram-negative organism found in many regions of the world. F. tularensis can cause a fatal, febrile illness, although these natural tularemia infections are rare in the United States. Read More

View Article
October 2018
3 Reads

Tick-Borne Illnesses in the United States.

Prim Care 2018 Sep 9;45(3):379-391. Epub 2018 Jul 9.

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 4500 San Pablo Road S, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA.

Close interaction with nature can lead to tick-borne illnesses, which are seen most frequently in primary care clinics when patients present symptoms. Considerable morbidity can result from untreated infections. Fortunately, these illnesses are often easily managed when diagnosed early. Read More

View Article
September 2018
18 Reads

Phylogenetic Lineages of in Animals.

Authors:
Paola Pilo

Front Cell Infect Microbiol 2018 31;8:258. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

Vetsuisse Faculty, Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology, Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

Tularemia is a zoonotic disease caused by the facultative intracellular bacterium . This microorganism can infect a plethora of animal species and its ecology is particularly complex. Much research was performed to understand its biology but many questions are still open, especially concerning the life cycle of this bacterium in the environment related to physical and biological parameters. Read More

View Article
July 2018
9 Reads

A Novel Francisella-Like Endosymbiont in Haemaphysalis longicornis and Hyalomma asiaticum, China.

Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 2018 Dec 14;18(12):669-676. Epub 2018 Aug 14.

1 Department of Plague, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention , Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China .

Francisella tularensis causes a highly infectious zoonotic disease tularemia. Both Haemaphysalis longicornis and Hyalomma asiaticum are widely distributed in China, but the presence of Francisella and Francisella-like endosymbionts (FLEs) in the two tick species is poorly understood. Therefore, a total of 627 H. Read More

View Article
December 2018
5 Reads

Subspecies differentiation and genotyping of Francisella tularensis strains isolated from clinical and environmental samples.

Lett Appl Microbiol 2018 Dec 13;67(6):550-556. Epub 2018 Nov 13.

Biological Threats Identification and Countermeasure Center, Military Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Puławy, Poland.

Molecular epidemiology is one of the most rapidly developing research area. In the light of past and modern technologies it has gained number of typing methods based on molecular biology techniques. In this report, the subspecies differentiation of Francisella tularensis and genotyping of strains isolated in Poland and other geographic locations were investigated using real-time PCR and multispacer typing (MST) methods respectively. Read More

View Article
December 2018
5 Reads

Macrophage-targeted drugamers with enzyme-cleavable linkers deliver high intracellular drug dosing and sustained drug pharmacokinetics against alveolar pulmonary infections.

J Control Release 2018 Oct 9;287:1-11. Epub 2018 Aug 9.

Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, United States. Electronic address:

Intracellular bacterial infections localized to the lung alveolar macrophage (AM) remain one of the most challenging settings for antimicrobial therapy. Current systemic antibiotic treatment fails to deliver sustained doses to intracellular bacterial reservoirs, which necessitates prolonged treatment regimens. Herein, we demonstrate a new intracellular enzyme-cleavable polymeric prodrug with tailored ciprofloxacin release profiles in the lungs and AM. Read More

View Article
October 2018
3 Reads

Distinguishing Respiratory Features of Category A/B Potential Bioterrorism Agents from Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

Health Secur 2018 Jul/Aug;16(4):224-238. Epub 2018 Aug 10.

Differentiating between illness caused by community-acquired respiratory pathogens versus infection by biothreat agents is a challenge. This review highlights respiratory and clinical features of category A and B potential biothreat agents that have respiratory features as their primary presenting signs and symptoms. Recent world events make such a reminder that the possibility of rare diseases and unlikely events can occur timely for clinicians, policymakers, and public health authorities. Read More

View Article
December 2018
2 Reads

Early cellular responses of germ-free and specific-pathogen-free mice to Francisella tularensis infection.

Microb Pathog 2018 Oct 25;123:314-322. Epub 2018 Jul 25.

Department of Molecular Pathology and Biology, Faculty of Military Health Sciences, University of Defence, 1575 Trebesska, 500 01, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic. Electronic address:

Bacteria that are highly virulent, expressing high infectivity, and able to survive nebulization, pose great risk to the human population. One of these is Francisella tularensis, the etiological agent of tularemia. F. Read More

View Article
October 2018
2 Reads

Obesity Exacerbates the Cytokine Storm Elicited by Infection of Females and Is Associated with Increased Mortality.

Biomed Res Int 2018 26;2018:3412732. Epub 2018 Jun 26.

Department of Biological Sciences and Border Biomedical Research Center, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX, USA.

Infection with , the causative agent of the human disease tularemia, results in the overproduction of inflammatory cytokines, termed the cytokine storm. Excess metabolic byproducts of obesity accumulate in obese individuals and activate the same inflammatory signaling pathways as infection. In addition, elevated levels of leptin in obese individuals also increase inflammation. Read More

View Article
June 2018
2 Reads

Molecular Survey of Tularemia and Plague in Small Mammals From Iran.

Front Cell Infect Microbiol 2018 10;8:215. Epub 2018 Jul 10.

Department of Clinical Microbiology and the Laboratory for Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.

Plague and tularemia are zoonoses and their causative bacteria are circulating in certain regions of Iran. This study was conducted to investigate potential disease reservoirs amongst small wildlife species in different regions of Iran. Rodents, insectivores and hares from 17 different provinces of the country were collected in 2014 and 2015. Read More

View Article
July 2018
3 Reads
2.620 Impact Factor

Paenibacillus assamensis in Joint Fluid of Man with Suspected Tularemia, China.

Emerg Infect Dis 2018 Aug;24(8):1589-1591

Paenibacillus assamensis is a bacterium usually found in warm springs. We detected P. assamensis in a man with suspected tularemia. Read More

View Article
August 2018
8 Reads

Development and Evaluation of a Latex Agglutination Test for the Identification of Francisella tularensis Subspecies Pathogenic for Human.

Pol J Microbiol 2018 Jun;67(2):241-244

Department of Sera and Vaccines Evaluation, National Institute of Public Health - National Institute of Hygiene,Warsaw,Poland.

Francisella tularensis are highly infectious bacteria causing a zoonotic disease called tularemia. Identification of this bacterium is based on antigen detection or PCR. The paper presents a latex agglutination test (LAT) for rapid identification of clinically relevant F. Read More

View Article
June 2018
1 Read

Coinfections identified from metagenomic analysis of cervical lymph nodes from tularemia patients.

BMC Infect Dis 2018 Jul 11;18(1):319. Epub 2018 Jul 11.

Pathogen and Microbiome Institute, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, USA.

Background: Underlying coinfections may complicate infectious disease states but commonly go unnoticed because an a priori clinical suspicion is usually required so they can be detected via targeted diagnostic tools. Shotgun metagenomics is a broad diagnostic tool that can be useful for identifying multiple microbes simultaneously especially if coupled with lymph node aspirates, a clinical matrix known to house disparate pathogens. The objective of this study was to analyze the utility of this unconventional diagnostic approach (shotgun metagenomics) using clinical samples from human tularemia cases as a test model. Read More

View Article
July 2018
2 Reads

Intradermal Delivery of Bacteria by Using Microneedle Arrays.

Infect Immun 2018 Sep 22;86(9). Epub 2018 Aug 22.

Department of Microbial Pathogenesis, University of Maryland-Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Infectious diseases propagated by arthropod vectors, such as tularemia, are commonly initiated via dermal infection of the skin. However, due to the technical difficulties in achieving accurate and reproducible dermal deposition, intradermal models are less commonly used. To overcome these limitations, we used microneedle arrays (MNAs), which are micron-scale polymeric structures, to temporarily disrupt the barrier function of the skin and deliver a bacterial inoculum directly to the dermis of an animal. Read More

View Article
September 2018
9 Reads

Temporal Requirement for Pulmonary Resident and Circulating T Cells during Virulent Infection.

J Immunol 2018 Aug 6;201(4):1186-1193. Epub 2018 Jul 6.

Immunity to Pulmonary Pathogens Section, Laboratory of Bacteriology, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, MT 59840; and

The lung is a complex organ with anatomically distinct pools of T cells that play specific roles in combating infection. Our knowledge regarding the generation and/or maintenance of immunity by parenchymal or circulating T cells has been gathered from either persistent (>60 d) or rapidly cleared (<10 d) infections. However, the roles of these distinct T cell pools in infections that are cleared over the course of several weeks are not understood. Read More

View Article
August 2018
2 Reads
4.920 Impact Factor

Expression of Francisella pathogenicity island protein intracellular growth locus E (IglE) in mammalian cells is involved in intracellular trafficking, possibly through microtubule organizing center.

Microbiologyopen 2018 Jul 5:e00684. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

The United Graduate School of Veterinary Science, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi, Japan.

Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of the infectious disease tularemia and is designated a category A bioterrorism agent. The type VI secretion system encoded by the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI) is necessary for intracellular growth; however, the functions of FPI proteins are largely unknown. In this study, we found that the FPI protein intracellular growth locus E (IglE) showed a unique localization pattern compared to other FPI proteins. Read More

View Article
July 2018
2 Reads

Towards integrated surveillance of zoonoses: spatiotemporal joint modeling of rodent population data and human tularemia cases in Finland.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2018 Jul 5;18(1):72. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK.

Background: There are an increasing number of geo-coded information streams available which could improve public health surveillance accuracy and efficiency when properly integrated. Specifically, for zoonotic diseases, knowledge of spatial and temporal patterns of animal host distribution can be used to raise awareness of human risk and enhance early prediction accuracy of human incidence.

Methods: To this end, we develop a spatiotemporal joint modeling framework to integrate human case data and animal host data to offer a modeling alternative for combining multiple surveillance data streams in a novel way. Read More

View Article
July 2018
5 Reads

RtxA like protein contributes to infection of Francisella novicida in silkworm and human macrophage THP-1.

Microb Pathog 2018 Oct 30;123:74-81. Epub 2018 Jun 30.

The United Graduate School of Veterinary Science, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1, Yoshida, Yamaguchi, 753-8515, Japan. Electronic address:

Tularemia is a zoonosis caused by CDC-declared Tier 1 threat agent Francisella tularensis. F. tularensis subsp. Read More

View Article
October 2018

Further Characterization of the Capsule-Like Complex (CLC) Produced by Subspecies : Protective Efficacy and Similarity to Outer Membrane Vesicles.

Front Cell Infect Microbiol 2018 15;8:182. Epub 2018 Jun 15.

Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, United States.

is the etiologic agent of tularemia, and subspecies (type A) is the most virulent subspecies. The live vaccine strain (LVS) of subspecies produces a capsule-like complex (CLC) that consists of a large variety of glycoproteins. Expression of the CLC is greatly enhanced when the bacteria are subcultured in and grown on chemically defined medium. Read More

View Article
June 2018
8 Reads

Case reports on dangerous infectious diseases: a review of patient consent.

Authors:
Kieran Walsh

J R Army Med Corps 2018 Jun 29. Epub 2018 Jun 29.

Case reports are commonly used to describe new infectious diseases. In the past 20 years, there have been an increasing number of emerging infectious diseases that could constitute a major threat to global health security (through naturally occurring pandemics or deliberate release of infectious agents). It is vitally important that case reports related to infectious diseases are written up according to the highest possible standards and that guidelines regarding patient consent to publish are followed. Read More

View Article
June 2018
2 Reads

Mosquito and Tick-borne Illnesses in the United States. Guidelines for the Recognition and empiric Treatment of Zoonotic Diseases in the Wilderness.

Authors:
Suresh Antony

Infect Disord Drug Targets 2018 Jun 26. Epub 2018 Jun 26.

Department of Infectious Diseases, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso, Texas and Burrell College of Osteopathic Medicine, Las Cruses, New Mexico. United States.

In the United States, tick-borne illnesses account for a significant number of patients that have been seen and treated by health care facilities. This in turn, has resulted in a significant morbidity and mortality and economic costs to the country. The distribution of these illnesses is geographically variable and is related to the climate as well. Read More

View Article
June 2018
12 Reads

Reveals Niche Differences Between Highly Pathogenic and Closely Related Strains of spp.

Front Cell Infect Microbiol 2018 5;8:188. Epub 2018 Jun 5.

Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Umeå, Sweden.

, a highly virulent bacteria that causes the zoonotic disease tularemia, is considered a potential agent of biological warfare and bioterrorism. Although the host range for several species within the is known, little is known about the natural reservoirs of various species. The lack of knowledge regarding the environmental fates of these pathogens greatly reduces the possibilities for microbial risk assessments. Read More

View Article
June 2018
2 Reads

An Improved Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV)-Conjugated Multiantigen Subunit Vaccine Against Respiratory Tularemia.

Front Microbiol 2018 5;9:1195. Epub 2018 Jun 5.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, United States.

, the causative agent of the fatal human disease known as tularemia is classified as a Category A Select Agent by the Centers for Disease Control. No licensed vaccine is currently available for prevention of tularemia in the United States. Previously, we published that a tri-antigen tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) vaccine confers 50% protection in immunized mice against respiratory tularemia caused by . Read More

View Article
June 2018
2 Reads
3.940 Impact Factor

Zoonoses under our noses.

Microbes Infect 2018 Jun 18. Epub 2018 Jun 18.

Living Systems Institute, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QD United Kingdom.

One Health is an effective approach for the management of zoonotic disease in humans, animals and environments. Examples of the management of bacterial zoonoses in Europe and across the globe demonstrate that One Health approaches of international surveillance, information-sharing and appropriate intervention methods are required to successfully prevent and control disease outbreaks in both endemic and non-endemic regions. Additionally, a One Health approach enables effective preparation and response to bioterrorism threats. Read More

View Article
June 2018
7 Reads

Newly emerging ulceroglandular tularaemia in Western Austria.

Ticks Tick Borne Dis 2018 07 6;9(5):1331-1333. Epub 2018 Jun 6.

Department of Internal Medicine II, Infectious Diseases, Immunology, Rheumatology, Pneumology, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.

Tularaemia is a rare zoonotic disease caused by Francisella tularensis in humans. In Europe infections of humans and animals are mainly caused by F. tularensis subspecies holarctica. Read More

View Article
July 2018
9 Reads

Live Attenuated Tularemia Vaccines for Protection Against Respiratory Challenge With Virulent subsp. .

Front Cell Infect Microbiol 2018 15;8:154. Epub 2018 May 15.

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, 37-121 Center for Health Sciences, School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, United States.

is the causative agent of tularemia and a Tier I bioterrorism agent. In the 1900s, several vaccines were developed against tularemia including the killed "Foshay" vaccine, subunit vaccines comprising protein(s) or lipoproteins(s) in an adjuvant formulation, and the Live Vaccine Strain (LVS); none were licensed in the U.S. Read More

View Article
May 2018
7 Reads

Environmental Surveillance of Zoonotic in the Netherlands.

Front Cell Infect Microbiol 2018 8;8:140. Epub 2018 May 8.

Zoonoses and Environmental Microbiology, Centre for Infectious Diseases Control, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands.

Tularemia is an emerging zoonosis caused by the Gram-negative bacterium , which is able to infect a range of animal species and humans. Human infections occur through contact with animals, ingestion of food, insect bites or exposure to aerosols or water, and may lead to serious disease. may persist in aquatic reservoirs. Read More

View Article
May 2018
5 Reads