4,100 results match your criteria Tularemia


The prevalence of spp. in different natural surface water samples collected from northwest of Iran.

Iran J Microbiol 2019 Feb;11(1):19-24

National Reference Laboratory for Plague, Tularemia and Q Fever, Research Centre for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Akanlu, Kabudar Ahang, Hamadan, Iran.

Background And Objectives: has a wide distribution in northern hemisphere of the world. Up to now, there was little information about the spp. situation in the environmental samples in Iran. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6462269PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Vaccines for emerging pathogens: from research to the clinic.

Authors:
E D Williamson

Clin Exp Immunol 2019 May;196(2):155-156

Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, Porton Down, Salisbury, UK.

In this two-part series of reviews, we have invited experts in their fields to contribute articles on the status of vaccine research and development for emerging pathogens. This topic has been brought into sharp focus in recent years following significant outbreaks of viral diseases such as those causing severe acute respiratory syndrome and Middle East respiratory syndrome, as well as devastating outbreaks of diseases caused by the Ebola, Marburg, Zika and Lassa fever viruses, to name only a few examples. Additionally, bacterial infections leading to bubonic and pneumonic plague, most notably in Madagascar in 2018, as well as malaria in many tropical countries, melioidosis in south east Asia and tularaemia in northern Europe and North America, have incurred significant morbidity and mortality. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/cei.13303
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cei.13303DOI Listing
May 2019
2 Reads

[Zoonoses related to leisure activities].

Authors:
Nadia Haddad

Rev Prat 2019 Mar;69(3):336-340

UMR BIPAR, Ecole nationale vétérinaire d'Alfort, Anses, INRA, université Paris-Est, Maisons- Alfort, France.

Zoonoses related to leisure activities. Many zoonoses can be contracted by humans during recreational activities. In the context of a walk, some of them, such as Lyme disease, are transmissible by biological vectors, particularly ticks, or by aerosol (Q fever, hantavirose), whereas others can be contracted in case of aquatic activities (leptospirosis), hunting (tularaemia), and visits to pet farms or fairs (especially the hemolytic uremic syndrome). Read More

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March 2019
3 Reads

[Animal and human bites : what to do and what to know ?]

Rev Med Suisse 2019 Apr;15(646):780-785

Service des maladies infectieuses, HUG, 1211 Genève 14.

Animal and human bites are a common cause of admission to the emergency room and the infections are common, although they are often trivialized. Complications can range from simple cellulitis to septic shock especially in asplenic patients with Capnoyctophaga canimorsus infection. Other less common infections are possible such as rat-bite fever, leptospirosis, tularemia, and evaluation of post-exposure prophylaxis (anti-tetanus, anti-rabies, HIV, HBV) is essential. Read More

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April 2019
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Development of an indirect ELISA based on whole cell Brucella abortus S99 lysates for detection of IgM anti-Brucella antibodies in human serum.

Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis 2019 Apr 19;63:87-93. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Department of Molecular Biology, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Pasteur Ave., Tehran, 13164, Iran. Electronic address:

Background: Brucellosis is the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the diagnostic performance of an indirect-ELISA (I-ELISA) method based on whole cell Brucella abortus S99 lysates for detection of IgM anti-Brucella antibodies in a human serum.

Materials And Methods: The study was conducted in two species-rich endemic areas of Iran (Tehran and Lorestan provinces). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cimid.2019.01.007DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read
2.015 Impact Factor

High prevalence and risk factors of Coxiella burnetii in milk of dairy animals with a history of abortion in Iran.

Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis 2019 Apr 2;63:127-130. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatics, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran; National Reference Laboratory of Plague, Tularemia and Q Fever, Research Centre for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Akanlu, Kabudar-Ahang, Hamadan, Iran.

Coxiella burnetii is causative agent of Q fever, which is a public health problem in most countries. The aim of this study was to study the prevalence rate of C. burnetii in raw milk of dairy animals in Iran with previous history of abortion. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01479571193002
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cimid.2019.01.015DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

Mortality due to Tyzzer's Disease of Muskrats in Northern Ohio, USA.

J Wildl Dis 2019 Apr 3. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

1 US Geological Survey, National Wildlife Health Center, 6006 Schroeder Road, Madison, Wisconsin 53711, USA.

In 2017, we investigated a mortality event of muskrat ( Ondatra zibethicus) in Northwest Ohio, USA, and determined the causes of death to be from Tyzzer's disease due to Clostridium piliforme and Klebsiella pneumoniae septicemia. The gross presentation resembled tularemia, which highlighted the importance of a complete diagnostic investigation. Read More

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April 2019
2 Reads

Tularemia ( Francisella tularensis) in a Black-Tailed Prairie Dog ( Cynomys ludovicianus) Colony.

J Wildl Dis 2019 Mar 28. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

2 Wildlife Health Branch, Biological Resources Division, National Park Service, 1201 Oakridge Drive, Fort Collins, Colorado 80525, USA.

Tularemia is a bacterial zoonosis caused by Francisella tularensis. We conducted a serosurvey of black-tailed prairie dogs ( Cynomys ludovicianus) in Devils Tower National Monument, Wyoming, following an epizootic in voles ( Microtus spp.) due to F. Read More

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A detailed review of the mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) of Iran and their medical and veterinary importance.

Acta Trop 2019 Mar 18;194:106-122. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Department of Life Sciences, Natural History Museum, London, UK.

Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are the most significant arthropods of medical importance because of the burden of diseases, such as malaria, encephalitis and filariasis, which are caused by pathogens and parasites they transmit to humans. In 2007, the most recently published checklist of Iranian mosquitoes included 64 species representing seven genera. Public databases were searched to the end of August 2018 for publications concerning the diseases in Iran caused by mosquito-borne pathogens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2019.03.019DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Glycoconjugate vaccine using a genetically modified O antigen induces protective antibodies to .

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2019 Apr 14;116(14):7062-7070. Epub 2019 Mar 14.

Department of Immunology, Blavatnik Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115;

is the causative agent of tularemia, a category A bioterrorism agent. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O antigen (OAg) of has been considered for use in a glycoconjugate vaccine, but conjugate vaccines tested so far have failed to confer protection necessary against aerosolized pulmonary bacterial challenge. When OAg was purified under standard conditions, the antigen had a small molecular size [25 kDa, low molecular weight (LMW)]. Read More

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http://www.pnas.org/lookup/doi/10.1073/pnas.1900144116
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1900144116DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6452683PMC
April 2019
3 Reads

Role of peroxiredoxin of the AhpC/TSA family in antioxidant defense mechanisms of Francisella tularensis.

PLoS One 2019 14;14(3):e0213699. Epub 2019 Mar 14.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, United States of America.

Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of a lethal human disease known as tularemia. Due to its extremely high virulence and potential to be used as a bioterror agent, F. tularensis is classified by the CDC as a Category A Select Agent. Read More

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0213699PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6417708PMC
March 2019
1 Read
3.234 Impact Factor

Precision medicine: retrospective chart review and data analysis of 200 patients on dapsone combination therapy for chronic Lyme disease/post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome: part 1.

Int J Gen Med 2019 18;12:101-119. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Hudson Valley Healing Arts Center, Hyde Park, NY 12538, USA,

Purpose: We collected data from an online survey of 200 of our patients, which evaluated the efficacy of dapsone (diaminodiphenyl sulfone, ie, DDS) combined with other antibiotics and agents that disrupt biofilms for the treatment of chronic Lyme disease/post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). We also collected aggregate data from direct retrospective chart review, including laboratory testing for Lyme, other infections, and associated tick-borne coinfections. This helped us to determine the frequency of exposure to other infections/coinfections among a cohort of chronically ill Lyme patients, evaluate the efficacy of newer "persister" drug regimens like DDS, and determine how other infections and tick-borne coinfections may be contributing to the burden of chronic illness leading to resistant symptomatology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S193608DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6388746PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

Severe infections due to Francisella tularensis ssp. holarctica in solid organ transplant recipient: report of two cases and review of literature.

BMC Infect Dis 2019 Mar 8;19(1):238. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Department of Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of Tours, Hospital Bretonneau, 2, boulevard Tonnellé, 37044, Tours Cedex 9, France.

Background: Tularemia is a rare zoonotic infection caused by bacterium Francisella tularensis. It has been well described in immunocompetent patients but poorly described in immunocompromised patients notably in solid organ transplant recipients.

Case Presentations: We report here two cases of tularemia in solid organ transplant recipients including first case after heart transplant. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12879-019-3863-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6408858PMC
March 2019
2 Reads

Phylogeographic Distribution of Human and Hare Subsp. Strains in the Netherlands and Its Pathology in European Brown Hares .

Front Cell Infect Microbiol 2019 11;9:11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Dutch Wildlife Health Centre, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.

Sequence-based typing of has led to insights in the evolutionary developments of tularemia. In Europe, two major basal clades of subsp. exist, with a distinct geographical distribution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2019.00011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6378916PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

Seroprevalence of Q fever among high-risk occupations in the Ilam province, the west of Iran.

PLoS One 2019 19;14(2):e0211781. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Research Centre for Emerging and Reemerging infectious diseases, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Q fever is a zoonotic disease of great public health importance in Iran. This disease is presented with high phase I antibody development in chronic and high phase II antibody in the acute form of illness. This study was conducted to evaluate the seroprevalence of Q fever among high-risk occupations in the Ilam province in Western Iran. Read More

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0211781PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6380538PMC
February 2019
8 Reads
3.234 Impact Factor

[A comparative study of experimental and commercial serological tests for detection of antibodies in humans with tularemia.]

Klin Lab Diagn 2018;63(10):630-635

Irkutsk Antiplague Research Institute of Siberia and Far East, 664047, Irkutsk, Russian Federation.

Experimental serological tests were developed to determine anti-tularensis antibodies in humans in immunochromatography formats (LF-test LPS Ft15) and enzyme immunoassay (ELISA LPS Ft15) using as an antigen highly purified LPS F. tularensis 15 NIIEG. Analysis was conducted of the sensitivity and specificity of the developed tests and commercial tularemia antigen «RNGA-Tul-AG» (production Stavropol research anti-plague Institute) in comparison with the commercial reference antigen, registered in the Russian Federation for the quantitative determination of human IgG tularemia - «ELISA classic Francisella tularensis IgG» SERION, Germany (IgG SERION ELISA). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18821/0869-2084-2018-63-10-630-635DOI Listing
January 2018
2 Reads

Prevalence of Francisella tularensis in Dermacentor variabilis Ticks, Minnesota, 2017.

Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

1 Foodborne, Waterborne, Vectorborne, and Zoonotic Diseases Section, Minnesota Department of Health, St. Paul, Minnesota.

Introduction: The prevalence of Francisella tularensis in Minnesota ticks is unknown. Ticks collected at seven sites were tested to determine the infection prevalence of F. tularensis in Dermacentor variabilis in Minnesota. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/vbz.2018.2388DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Molecular prevalence of Coxiella burnetii in milk in Iran: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Trop Anim Health Prod 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Rajaie Cardiovascular Medical and Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Q fever is a major zoonotic disease in the world. The aim of this meta-analysis was to estimate the prevalence of Coxiella burnetii in animal milk in Iran. We systematically reviewed the literature to identify eligible studies from January 2008 to June 2016 in English or Farsi (Persian) databases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11250-019-01807-3DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads
0.817 Impact Factor

Genetic evidence of Coxiella burnetii infection in acute febrile illnesses in Iran.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2019 02 11;13(2):e0007181. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Rajaie Cardiovascular Medical and Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Mounting evidence suggests that Q-fever is more prevalent in Iran than originally believed. However, in most parts of the country, clinicians do not pay enough attention to Q fever in their differential diagnosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Coxiella burnetii in suspected cases of acute Q fever in north-western Iran using molecular techniques. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0007181DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6386404PMC
February 2019
5 Reads

Francisella tularensis Transmission by Solid Organ Transplantation, 2017.

Emerg Infect Dis 2019 Apr 17;25(4):767-775. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

In July 2017, fever and sepsis developed in 3 recipients of solid organs (1 heart and 2 kidneys) from a common donor in the United States; 1 of the kidney recipients died. Tularemia was suspected only after blood cultures from the surviving kidney recipient grew Francisella species. The organ donor, a middle-aged man from the southwestern United States, had been hospitalized for acute alcohol withdrawal syndrome, pneumonia, and multiorgan failure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2504.181807DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6433034PMC
April 2019
7 Reads

Contributions of TolC Orthologs to Schu S4 Multidrug Resistance, Modulation of Host Cell Responses, and Virulence.

Infect Immun 2019 Apr 25;87(4). Epub 2019 Mar 25.

Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, School of Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, USA

is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of tularemia. Previous studies with the attenuated live vaccine strain (LVS) identified a role for the outer membrane protein TolC in modulation of host cell responses during infection and virulence in the mouse model of tularemia. TolC is an integral part of efflux pumps that export small molecules and type I secretion systems that export a range of bacterial virulence factors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/IAI.00823-18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6434128PMC
April 2019
2 Reads

Tularemia: an experience of 13 cases including a rare myocarditis in a referral center in Eastern Switzerland (Central Europe) and a review of the literature.

Infection 2019 Jan 17. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Division of Infectious Diseases and Hospital Epidemiology, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Rorschacher Strasse 95, 9007, St. Gallen, Switzerland.

Background: Tularemia, a zoonotic disease caused by Francisella tularensis, can cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans including six major clinical presentations: the ulceroglandular, glandular, oculoglandular, oropharyngeal, typhoidal and pneumonic form. The epidemiology and ecology and thus transmission of tularemia are complex, depending on conditions unique to specific locations.

Case Series And Methods: Thirteen cases with different forms of the disease and one very rare case of a myocarditis are reported, discussed, and reviewed within the scope of current literature. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s15010-019-01269-7DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Global Analysis of Genes Essential for Francisella tularensis Schu S4 Growth and for Fitness during Competitive Infection of Fischer 344 Rats.

J Bacteriol 2019 Apr 13;201(7). Epub 2019 Mar 13.

Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, Chemical, Biological and Radiological Division, Salisbury, United Kingdom.

The highly virulent intracellular pathogen is a Gram-negative bacterium that has a wide host range, including humans, and is the causative agent of tularemia. To identify new therapeutic drug targets and vaccine candidates and investigate the genetic basis of virulence in the Fischer 344 rat, we have constructed an Schu S4 transposon library. This library consists of more than 300,000 unique transposon mutants and represents a transposon insertion for every 6 bp of the genome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.00630-18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6416918PMC
April 2019
8 Reads

[Tularemia: A case report].

Ann Dermatol Venereol 2019 Feb 9;146(2):131-134. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Service de dermatologie, université catholique Lille, hôpital Saint-Vincent de Paul, boulevard de Belfort - BP 387, 59020 Lille cedex, France.

Background: Tularaemia is a zoonotic disease caused by inoculation with the Gram-negative coccobacillus Francisella tularensis. It was first described in the United States in 1911 and is a rare disease with an annual reported incidence in France between 2002 and 2012 of 0.07 cases per 100,000 habitants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annder.2018.11.004DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

An O-Antigen Glycoconjugate Vaccine Produced Using Protein Glycan Coupling Technology Is Protective in an Inhalational Rat Model of Tularemia.

J Immunol Res 2018 29;2018:8087916. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP4 0JQ, UK.

There is a requirement for an efficacious vaccine to protect people against infection from , the etiological agent of tularemia. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of is suboptimally protective against a parenteral lethal challenge in mice. To develop a more efficacious subunit vaccine, we have used a novel biosynthetic technique of protein glycan coupling technology (PGCT) that exploits bacterial N-linked glycosylation to recombinantly conjugate O-antigen glycans to the immunogenic carrier protein exoprotein A (ExoA). Read More

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https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jir/2018/8087916/
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/8087916DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6304830PMC
April 2019
17 Reads

How universal is the transcription regulatory moonlighting role of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase?

Authors:
Sailen Barik

J Theor Biol 2019 Mar 28;464:112-114. Epub 2018 Dec 28.

3780 Pelham Drive, Mobile, AL 36619, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtbi.2018.12.037DOI Listing
March 2019
7 Reads

Tularemia: diagnosis of an unexpected oculoglandular case in a non-endemic area by universal PCR.

Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin 2018 Dec 27. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Department Head Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain; School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Oviedo, Asturias, Spain; Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias (IUOPA), Spain. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eimc.2018.12.003DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Human tularaemia associated with exposure to domestic dogs-United States, 2006-2016.

Zoonoses Public Health 2018 Dec 16. Epub 2018 Dec 16.

Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colorado.

Dogs have been implicated in the zoonotic transmission of numerous pathogens. Whereas cats are known to transmit Francisella tularensis to humans via bite and other routes, the role of dogs in facilitating infection is much less understood. We reviewed tularaemia case investigation records collected through national surveillance during 2006-2016 to summarize those with dog involvement, characterize the nature of dog-related exposure and describe associated clinical characteristics. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/zph.12552
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/zph.12552DOI Listing
December 2018
16 Reads

A survey on endoparasites in wild rodents of the Jaz Murian depression and adjacent areas, southeast of Iran.

J Parasit Dis 2018 Dec 13;42(4):589-597. Epub 2018 Oct 13.

Department of Plant Protection, Faculty of Agriculture, Higher Educational Complex of Saravan, Saravan, Iran.

In this survey, rodents and their endoparasites were investigated in the Jaz Murian depression and adjacent areas, southeast Iran. In total, 146 specimens of rodents belong to 13 species were trapped. In general, 10 different genera of endoparasites including 11 species were collected. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12639-018-1040-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6261136PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

Evaluation of an outbred mouse model for Francisella tularensis vaccine development and testing.

PLoS One 2018 11;13(12):e0207587. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

Department of Immunology & Microbial Disease, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY, United States of America.

Francisella tularensis (Ft) is a biothreat agent for which there is no FDA-approved human vaccine. Currently, there are substantial efforts underway to develop both vaccines and the tools to assess these vaccines. Tularemia laboratory research has historically relied primarily upon a small number of inbred mouse strains, but the utility of such findings to outbred animals may be limited. Read More

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0207587PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6289435PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

A case of ulceroglandular tularemia presenting with lymphadenopathy and an ulcer on a linear morphoea lesion surrounded by erysipelas.

Int Med Case Rep J 2018 12;11:313-318. Epub 2018 Nov 12.

Department of Infectious Diseases, Regional Hospital of Bellinzona e Valli, 6500 Bellinzona, Ticino, Switzerland.

Tularemia is a zoonosis caused by the infection of (a gram-negative aerobic bacterium). Transmission to other animals or humans usually occurs through insect or tick bites, direct contact with a contaminated environment (mud or water), infected animals - mainly lagomorphs - or by ingesting undercooked meat or inhaling contaminated dust (hay or soil). This paper discusses the case of a 32-year-old man, who came to our Emergency Room presenting with persistent fever, inguinal lymphadenopathy, and an ulcer on his left lower limb on a linear morphoea lesion that had been there for some time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IMCRJ.S178561DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6237246PMC
November 2018
4 Reads

Francisella tularensis Exposure Among National Park Service Employees During an Epizootic: Devils Tower National Monument, Wyoming, 2015.

Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 2018 Dec 1. Epub 2018 Dec 1.

4 Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , Fort Collins, Colorado.

Introduction: Tularemia is a zoonotic infection caused by the highly infectious bacterium Francisella tularensis. Persons having outdoor professions are more likely than others to be exposed to F. tularensis through increased contact with arthropods, infected animals, and contaminated aerosols. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/vbz.2018.2360DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

First Case of Tularemia Reported in Portugal: Probably of Imported Origin.

Front Public Health 2018 19;6:325. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

Internal Medicine Service 4, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central, Santa Marta Hospital, Lisbon, Portugal.

The authors report the case of a 47-year-old man who walked in the countryside on the island of Bornholm, during the summer period. Three days later, fever, myalgias and adynamia began. The serological tests, Real-time PCR and isolation of the bacteria from the culture of lymph biopsy confirmed the presence of subsp. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2018.00325DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6252358PMC
November 2018
3 Reads

A case report of human tularemia from Iran.

Iran J Microbiol 2018 Aug;10(4):250-253

National Reference Laboratory for Plague, Tularemia and Q Fever, Research Centre for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Akanlu, Kabudar Ahang, Hamadan, Iran.

Tularemia is one of the most contagious bacterial infections. Here, we report a human case of glandular tularemia in Iran following the first report in 1980. The patient was a 6-year-old girl who had consumed a hunted hare in Kurdistan Province in western Iran. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6243145PMC
August 2018
6 Reads

Nanoparticle Formulation of Moxifloxacin and Intramuscular Route of Delivery Improve Antibiotic Pharmacokinetics and Treatment of Pneumonic Tularemia in a Mouse Model.

ACS Infect Dis 2019 Feb 10;5(2):281-291. Epub 2018 Dec 10.

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine , University of California , CHS 37-121, 10833 Le Conte Avenue , Los Angeles , California 90095-1688 , United States.

Francisella tularensis causes a serious and often fatal infection, tularemia. We compared the efficacy of moxifloxacin formulated as free drug vs disulfide snap-top mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) in a mouse model of pneumonic tularemia. We found that MSN-formulated moxifloxacin was more effective than free drug and that the intramuscular and subcutaneous routes were markedly more effective than the intravenous route. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsinfecdis.8b00268DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Detection of Francisella tularensis in three vole species in Central Europe.

Transbound Emerg Dis 2019 Mar 8;66(2):1029-1032. Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Institute of Novel and Emerging Infectious Diseases, Greifswald-Insel Riems, Germany.

Francisella tularensis is a zoonotic, gram-negative bacterium that causes tularemia in humans. Depending on its subspecies and the route of transmission, mild to lethal courses have been reported. F. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/tbed.13078
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbed.13078DOI Listing
March 2019
14 Reads

Case of the month: What's your diagnosis?

Schweiz Arch Tierheilkd 2018 Nov;160(11):673-675

Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.17236/sat00185DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Aerosol prime-boost vaccination provides strong protection in outbred rabbits against virulent type A Francisella tularensis.

PLoS One 2018 22;13(10):e0205928. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

Center for Vaccine Research, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States of America.

Tularemia, also known as rabbit fever, is a severe zoonotic disease in humans caused by the gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis (Ft). While there have been a number of attempts to develop a vaccine for Ft, few candidates have advanced beyond experiments in inbred mice. We report here that a prime-boost strategy with aerosol delivery of recombinant live attenuated candidate Ft S4ΔaroD offers significant protection (83% survival) in an outbred animal model, New Zealand White rabbits, against aerosol challenge with 248 cfu (11 LD50) of virulent type A Ft SCHU S4. Read More

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0205928PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6197691PMC
April 2019
15 Reads

Current Status of Tick-Borne Diseases in South Korea.

Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 2019 Apr 17;19(4):225-233. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

1 Department of Internal Medicine and Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon, Republic of Korea.

Background: Bites with tick-borne pathogens can cause various bacterial, viral, or parasitic diseases in humans. Tick-transmitted diseases are known as contributing factors to the increasing incidence and burden of diseases. The present article investigated the epidemiology of tick-borne diseases in South Korea. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/vbz.2018.2298DOI Listing
April 2019
10 Reads

Human infectious diseases and the changing climate in the Arctic.

Environ Int 2018 12 11;121(Pt 1):703-713. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

Arctic Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland; Thule Institute, University of Arctic, University of Oulu, Finland.

Climatic factors, especially temperature, precipitation, and humidity play an important role in disease transmission. As the Arctic changes at an unprecedented rate due to climate change, understanding how climatic factors and climate change affect infectious disease rates is important for minimizing human and economic costs. The purpose of this systematic review was to compile recent studies in the field and compare the results to a previously published review. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01604120183120
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2018.09.042DOI Listing
December 2018
24 Reads

Babesia conradae infection in coyote hunting dogs infected with multiple blood-borne pathogens.

J Vet Intern Med 2018 Sep 11;32(5):1609-1617. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, California.

Background: Babesia conradae is an intraerythrocytic piroplasm infecting dogs in the southern United States. Ticks have been suspected, but unproven, as vectors. We identified B. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/jvim.15233
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jvim.15233DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6189381PMC
September 2018
6 Reads

Protection induced by a Francisella tularensis subunit vaccine delivered by glucan particles.

PLoS One 2018 8;13(10):e0200213. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

CBR Division, Dstl Porton Down, Salisbury, United Kingdom.

Francisella tularensis is an intracellular pathogen causing the disease tularemia, and an organism of concern to biodefence. There is no licensed vaccine available. Subunit approaches have failed to induce protection, which requires both humoral and cellular immune memory responses, and have been hampered by a lack of understanding as to which antigens are immunoprotective. Read More

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0200213PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6175290PMC
March 2019
37 Reads

RECENT CHANGES IN INFECTIOUS DISEASES IN EUROPEAN WILDLIFE.

J Wildl Dis 2019 Jan 4;55(1):3-43. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

3   National Veterinary Institute (SVA), Ulls väg 2B, SE75189 Uppsala, Sweden.

Many infectious diseases originating from, or carried by, wildlife affect wildlife conservation and biodiversity, livestock health, or human health. We provide an update on changes in the epidemiology of 25 selected infectious, wildlife-related diseases in Europe (from 2010-16) that had an impact, or may have a future impact, on the health of wildlife, livestock, and humans. These pathogens were selected based on their: 1) identification in recent Europe-wide projects as important surveillance targets, 2) inclusion in European Union legislation as pathogens requiring obligatory surveillance, 3) presence in recent literature on wildlife-related diseases in Europe since 2010, 4) inclusion in key pathogen lists released by the Office International des Epizooties, 5) identification in conference presentations and informal discussions on a group email list by a European network of wildlife disease scientists from the European Wildlife Disease Association, or 6) identification as pathogens with changes in their epidemiology during 2010-16. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7589/2017-07-172DOI Listing
January 2019
35 Reads

Structural and functional studies of the metalloregulator Fur identify a promoter-binding mechanism and its role in virulence.

Commun Biol 2018 17;1:93. Epub 2018 Jul 17.

Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, CEA, BIG-LCBM, 38000 Grenoble, France.

is a Gram-negative bacterium causing tularaemia. Classified as possible bioterrorism agent, it may be transmitted to humans via animal infection or inhalation leading to severe pneumonia. Its virulence is related to iron homeostasis involving siderophore biosynthesis directly controlled at the transcription level by the ferric uptake regulator Fur, as presented here together with the first crystal structure of the tetrameric Fur in the presence of its physiological cofactor, Fe. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s42003-018-0095-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6123631PMC
July 2018
2 Reads

Tularemia transmission to humans: a multifaceted surveillance approach.

Epidemiol Infect 2018 Dec 25;146(16):2139-2145. Epub 2018 Sep 25.

Department of Molecular Epidemiology,National Centre for Disease Control and Public Health,Tbilisi,Georgia.

Tularemia has sustained seroprevalence in Eurasia, with estimates as high as 15% in endemic regions. The purpose of this report is to characterise the current epidemiology of Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica in Georgia. Three surveillance activities are summarised: (1) acute infections captured in Georgia's notifiable disease surveillance system, (2) infectious disease seroprevalence study of military volunteers, and (3) a study of seroprevalence and risk factors in endemic regions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0950268818002492DOI Listing
December 2018
8 Reads

Mobilizable Plasmids for Tunable Gene Expression in .

Front Cell Infect Microbiol 2018 31;8:284. Epub 2018 Aug 31.

Biozentrum, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

is the causative agent of the life-threatening disease tularemia. However, the molecular tools to study are limited. Especially, expression plasmids are sparse and difficult to use, as they are unstable and prone to spontaneous loss. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2018.00284DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6128221PMC
August 2018
11 Reads

[Painful lymphadenopathy after an insect bite-a case report].

Hautarzt 2019 Jan;70(1):47-50

Dermatologische Klinik, UniversitätsSpital Zürich, Gloriastr. 31, 8091, Zürich, Schweiz.

Tularemia is a bacterial zoonosis which is commonly transmitted through tick or insect bites or contact with meat of infected animals. We report the case of a 36-year-old man who developed fever, chills, headaches, and a painful, unilateral, inguinal lymphadenopathy with a red-livid skin discoloration after an insect bite on his abdomen. Ulceroglandular tularemia was diagnosed through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and serology. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00105-018-4237-z
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00105-018-4237-zDOI Listing
January 2019
26 Reads

Tetracyclines for Treatment of Tularemia: A Case Series.

Open Forum Infect Dis 2018 Sep 3;5(9):ofy176. Epub 2018 Sep 3.

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine.

Tetracyclines for tularemia have been associated with higher failure rates. There were 48 cases of tularemia at the University of Missouri between 1988 and 2015. We retrospectively analyzed 17 patients with tularemia who were successfully treated with tetracyclines, and 9 of these patients also underwent aspiration or incision and drainage. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/ofid/article/doi/10.1093/ofid/ofy17
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ofid/ofy176DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6122728PMC
September 2018
40 Reads

Glandular Tularemia.

N Engl J Med 2018 Sep;379(10):967

Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMicm1801531DOI Listing
September 2018
8 Reads