970 results match your criteria The British journal of sociology[Journal]


Perception of Western governments' hostility to Islam among European Muslims before and after ISIS: the important roles of residential segregation and education.

Br J Sociol 2019 Apr 19. Epub 2019 Apr 19.

University of Oklahoma.

Perception of Western governments' hostility to Islam is one of the indicating features of Islamic fundamentalism and, in some cases, is serving as a pull to join extremist groups. In this paper, using data from two waves of a cross-national survey, we investigate what affects European Muslims' opinions about Western governments. We find that residential segregation is associated with perceived hostility of Western governments to Islam. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12673DOI Listing

Greening the poor: the trap of moralization.

Authors:
Hadrien Malier

Br J Sociol 2019 Apr 3. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS).

This article uses ethnographic data to engage a critical reflection on the tension between individual responsibility for the environment and inequality. While research has shown that the majority of sustainable consumers are middle and upper class, educated and white individuals, the study explores how the ethical injunction to ecological sustainability is being introduced to lower-income neighbourhoods in France. It draws on the observation of a national programme which aims at supporting inhabitants of public housing estates in the process of greening their lifestyle in order to fight climate change and fuel poverty. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12672DOI Listing

School tracking and its role in social reproduction: reinforcing educational inheritance and the direct effects of social origin.

Br J Sociol 2019 Mar 29. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Institute for Employment Research (IAB).

The degree of social reproduction varies considerably between industrialized countries, raising the question of which institutional regulations promote or restrict this process. Education is considered the main mediator of social reproduction. Because school tracking - the sorting of children according to ability and interest at different ages - is known to affect educational attainment and the degree of tracking varies strongly across countries, it may thus account for differences in social reproduction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12655DOI Listing

Wrangling with the Black monster: young Black mixed-race men and masculinities.

Br J Sociol 2019 Mar 28. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

Social Sciences, University of Manchester.

In recent times there has been a proliferation of scholarship exploring 'mixedness' and mixed-race people. This is evidenced by the emergence of Critical Mixed Race Studies (CMRS) as a distinct field of academic inquiry. However, despite the growth of CMRS, there remains a scarcity of scholarship that considers mixed-race experiences from a disaggregated, intersectional perspective. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12670DOI Listing

Parental values in the UK.

Br J Sociol 2019 Mar 26. Epub 2019 Mar 26.

University of Exeter, Graduate School of Education.

This article investigates the extent to which parental values differ between social groups in the UK at the start of the twenty-first century. The study of parental values is an important area of sociological enquiry that can inform scholarship from across the social sciences concerned with educational inequality and cultural variability in family life. We draw on data from the Millennium Cohort Study to show how parent's social class, religion, religiosity, race and ethnicity, and education are related to the qualities they would like their children to have. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12658DOI Listing

Social class background and gender-(a)typical choices of fields of study in higher education.

Authors:
Sara Seehuus

Br J Sociol 2019 Mar 26. Epub 2019 Mar 26.

Centre for the Study of Professions, OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University.

By employing a Bourdieu-inspired class scheme that differentiates between classes' volume and composition of capital, and by analysing Norwegian administrative register data for birth cohorts between 1987 and 1992, this paper examines the relationship between social class background and gender-(a)typical choices of higher education. Fields of study in higher education in much of the Western world remain segregated by gender despite the gender gap in educational attainment having been reversed. However, some changes have taken place due to the influx of women into male-dominated, high-status fields. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12668DOI Listing

The field of graduate recruitment: leading financial and consultancy firms and elite class formation.

Br J Sociol 2019 Mar 24. Epub 2019 Mar 24.

Department of Education, University of Durham.

The symbolic value of being recruited by a high status multinational company likely represents an important marker of distinction. For the first time, a unique Destinations of Leavers in Higher Education (DLHE) data-set is used here to model entry to elite multinational company in finance, accountancy and consultancy sectors among graduates of different social origins, universities, degree subjects and with different degree classifications. From a sample of 11,755 graduates working across these three sectors, we examine what predicts entry to 31 leading firms and then examine pay hierarchies among the 3,260 graduates working for these companies using random-effects models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12659DOI Listing

Interrogating the tribal: the aporia of 'tribalism' in the sociological study of the Middle East.

Br J Sociol 2019 Mar 20. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Centro de Estudios de Asia y África.

In this paper, we intend to deconstruct the term 'tribalism' as a colonial category, which figures as a prominent concept in social studies on Kurds as well as the Middle East at large. Blithely used, tribalism has occupied a central place, especially in the existing scholarship on Kurdistan. Some earlier anthropological works have gone so far as to regard tribalism as the 'DNA' of Middle Eastern people. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12656DOI Listing

Making space for 'the social': connecting sociology and professional practices in urban lighting design1.

Br J Sociol 2019 Mar 12. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Department of Sociology, London School of Economics.

Lighting is increasingly recognized as a significant social intervention by both lighting professionals and academic social scientists. However, what counts as 'the social' is diverse and contested, with consequences for what kind of 'social' is performed or invented. Based on a long-term research programme, we argue that collaboration between sociologists and lighting professionals requires negotiating discourses and practices of 'the social'. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12657DOI Listing

Normalizing covert surveillance: the subterranean world of policing.

Authors:
Bethan Loftus

Br J Sociol 2019 Mar 6. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

School of History, Philosophy and Social Sciences, Bangor University.

In this article, I draw on data derived from an ethnographic field study of covert policing in the United Kingdom to demonstrate that the deployment of covert surveillance has become normalized, both in policing thought and operational practice. In a break with earlier patterns, the methods of covert surveillance are used extensively and are no longer regarded as a tactic of last resort. Covert policing is well anchored within organizational arrangements, empowered by a series of internal rationales mobilized to justify the expansion of covert tactics over and above more traditional, overt forms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12651DOI Listing

Social network engagement and subjective well-being: a life-course perspective.

Br J Sociol 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Psychology, School of Social Sciences, Nottingham Trent University.

Social networking is a digital phenomenon embraced by billions worldwide. Use of online social platforms has the potential to generate a number of benefits including to well-being from enhanced social connectedness and social capital accumulation, but is also associated with several negative behaviours and impacts. Employing a life-course perspective, this paper explores social networking use and its relationship with measures of subjective well-being. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12644DOI Listing
February 2019

Everyone deserves quiche: French school lunch programmes and national culture in a globalized world.

Authors:
Rahsaan Maxwell

Br J Sociol 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Political Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Globalization poses many challenges for national cultural unity, especially in Europe. Some doubt whether national cultures will be able to survive, but there are many counter-trends pushing to maintain national cultural unity. I analyse the dual trends of global diversity and maintaining unity through an everyday manifestation of French culture: elementary school lunches. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12643DOI Listing
February 2019

Editorial.

Authors:

Br J Sociol 2019 Jan;70(1)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12638DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Cross-domain comparison and the politics of difference.

Br J Sociol 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

University of California, Los Angeles.

This paper makes the case for cross-domain comparison as an undertheorized form of comparative analysis. The units of analysis in such comparisons are not (as in most comparative analysis) predefined units within a domain or system of formally similar yet substantively different categories or entities; they are the domains or systems of categorically organized differences themselves. Focusing on domains of categorical difference that are central to the contemporary politics of difference, we consider two examples of cross-domain comparison. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12490DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

A thirst for the authentic: craft drinks producers and the narration of authenticity.

Br J Sociol 2019 Jan 17. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

School of Social Sciences, Loughborough University, Room U2, 18 Brockington Building, Ashby Road, Loughborough, UK.

There is a long academic tradition which positions the desire for authenticity as emerging as a symptom of dissatisfactions with modernity. Most recently, this has involved consumption of products that are valued for being authentic in contrast to mass produced commodities which are seen as being homogeneous, standardized and therefore inauthentic. A recent resurgence in interest in the idea of craft and craftwork has brought to the fore concerns about re-establishing connections between products, consumers and producers beyond rational market exchange. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12634DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Agency and clientship in public encounters: co-constructing 'neediness' and 'worthiness' in shelter placement meetings.

Br J Sociol 2019 Jan 9. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Department of Sociology, Goldsmith, University of London.

This article seeks to develop our understanding of the agency of vulnerable groups who at first sight may not seem to have much agency in their lives. It explores the co-constructed nature of agency in three Danish homeless shelters. Unlike earlier interview-based studies, our research is based on naturalistic data drawn from 23 video-recorded placement meetings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12633DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Terrorism and lethal moralism in the United States and United Kingdom, 1970-2017.

Br J Sociol 2019 Jan 4. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Department of Sociology, King's University College at Western.

The current paper examines terrorism as a special form of moralistic violence, with several key features that distinguish such behaviour from other types of violence. The theory of lethal moralism highlights the importance of social polarization, characterized by vast differences in social space and inequality between adversaries as crucial to explaining deadly terrorist attacks. Where the differences are more permanent or chronic - and the groups in question define and justify their existence specifically in contradistinction to 'other' groups - then the polarization intensifies and attacks tend to be more lethal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12635DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Curriculum requirements and subsequent civic engagement: is there a difference between 'forced' and 'free' community service?

Br J Sociol 2019 Jan 4. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Department of Psychology, Wilfrid Laurier University.

Despite figures showing the growth of mandatory community service programmes, there is mixed empirical evidence of their effectiveness. This paper addresses the relationship of mandated community service to one of its purported aims: subsequent volunteerism. It compares current volunteerism among four university student cohorts: those doing no service in secondary school, those volunteering with no requirement, those volunteering both before and after the introduction of a requirement, and those introduced to service through a requirement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12627DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Introduction to BJS Special Section: New Approaches to Socal Mobility.

Authors:
Andrew Miles

Br J Sociol 2018 Dec;69(4):1056-1062

Sociology, School of Social Sciences, University of Manchester.

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1468-4446.12626
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12626DOI Listing
December 2018
4 Reads

Socio-spatial mobilities and narratives of class identity in Britain.

Br J Sociol 2018 Dec;69(4):1063-1095

Loughborough University.

In this article we carry out the most comprehensive analysis of social and spatial mobility in the UK to date and the first to directly link different dimensions of mobility to processes of social class formation. Using new analytical techniques in this field, we integrate quantitative and qualitative data from the 1958 Birth Cohort Study, combining text-mining and correspondence analysis in order to examine the intersection of geographical and social mobility with class identities. This work reflects a revival of interest in the spatialization of class inequalities, which is connected to policy concerns about the regional dimension of Britain's mobility 'crisis' that have intensified in the wake of the 'Brexit' vote. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1468-4446.12624
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12624DOI Listing
December 2018
21 Reads

From democratic participation to civic resistance: the loss of institutional trust as an outcome of activism in the refugee solidarity movement.

Authors:
Jonas Toubøl

Br J Sociol 2018 Dec 12. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Adding to the literature on non-institutional political action and trust, this article argues that the loss of institutional trust is not only a cause but also an outcome of political activism. Studying the Danish refugee solidarity movement in a mixed-methods research design including survey and qualitative interview data, the article shows that three kinds of activism - political activism, humanitarian activity, and civil disobedience - relate differently to the loss of trust in the institutions of the Parliament, the legal system, and the police. Political activism primarily affects a loss of trust in the Parliament due to low external efficacy and a closed political opportunity structure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12622DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

A dynamic and multifunctional account of middle-range theories.

Authors:
Tuukka Kaidesoja

Br J Sociol 2018 Nov 21. Epub 2018 Nov 21.

Practical Philosophy, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 24 (Unioninkatu 40A), 00014, Finland.

This article develops a novel account of middle-range theories for combining theoretical and empirical analysis in explanatory sociology. I first revisit Robert K. Merton's original ideas on middle-range theories and identify a tension between his developmental approach to middle-range theorizing that recognizes multiple functions of theories in sociological research and his static definition of the concept of middle-range theory that focuses only on empirical testing of theories. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12621DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Agency of internal transnationalism in social memory.

Authors:
Nelly Bekus

Br J Sociol 2018 Nov 21. Epub 2018 Nov 21.

College of Humanities, University of Exeter.

The article examines the limitations of methodological nationalism in the studies of social memory through a case study of memory of Stalinist repression in Belarus. It analyses how various social agencies - national and local activists, religious organisations, and international foundations - use the memory of repression for constructing post-Soviet Belarusian identity by embedding their national representations in larger transnational frameworks. Drawing on the concept of 'internal globalisation', this article develops the idea of 'internal transnationalism' that suggests the importance of wider transnational configurations for the definition of nation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12620DOI Listing
November 2018
14 Reads

Class and status: on the misconstrual of the conceptual distinction and a neo-Bourdieusian alternative.

Br J Sociol 2018 Nov 11. Epub 2018 Nov 11.

Department of Media, Culture and Social Sciences, University of Stavanger.

In this article, we address the classical debate about the relationship between the economic and cultural aspects of social stratification, typically cast in terms of Weber's distinction between class and status. We discuss in particular Chan and Goldthorpe's influential, yet largely unchallenged, attempt to reinstate a strict version of the class-status distinction, mounted as an attack on 'Bourdieusian' accounts. We argue that this is unconvincing in two respects: There are fundamental problems with their conceptualization of status, producing a peculiar account where one expression of status honour explains the other; in addition, their portrayal of the Bourdieusian approach as one-dimensional is highly questionable. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12508DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Money as a social relation beyond the state: a contribution to the institutionalist approach based on the Argentinian trueque.

Authors:
Hadrien Saiag

Br J Sociol 2018 Nov 8. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

IIAC/LAIOS, EHESS.

This paper provides a contribution to the institutionalist approach to money through ethnographic research carried out in two local currency systems in Argentina (known as trueque). It argues that Argentinian local currencies must be considered as monies in their own right even if they differ from state and bank issued currencies, because they can be understood as systems of evaluation and settlement of debts denominated in a specific unit of account (the crédito). Money is said to be an ambivalent social relation because in the two cases studied it mediates very different dynamics, exacerbating inequality in one context and promoting collective emancipation in another. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12610DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

The collective/affective practice of cancer survivorship.

Br J Sociol 2018 Nov 8. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

Clinical Research Unit, The Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Cancer Care Services, Ground Floor Building 34, Herston, QLD, 4029, Australia.

Whether within an atmosphere of hope, or amidst relations of fear, the emotions of cancer are unavoidably collectively produced. Yet persistent individualistic paradigms continue to obscure how the emotions of cancer operate relationally - between bodies, subjects, discourses, and practices - and are intertwined with circulating beliefs, cultural desires, and various forms of normativity. Drawing on interviews with 80 people living with cancer in Australia, this paper illustrates why recognition of the collective enterprise of survivorship - and the collective production of emotion, more generally - is important in light of persistent, culturally dominant conceptions of the individual patient as the primary 'afflicted', 'feeling', and 'treated' subject. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1468-4446.12616
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12616DOI Listing
November 2018
13 Reads

Group formation, styles, and grammars of commonality in local activism.

Authors:
Eeva Luhtakallio

Br J Sociol 2018 Nov 8. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

University of Tampere.

This article argues that in order to analyse democracy as a pattern constantly processed in a given society, it is useful to look at activist groups' agenda setting and recruitment principles, group bonds and boundaries, and how these actions direct and influence ways of creating the common. Based on an ethnographic study on bicycle activism in Helsinki, Finland, it describes a local critical mass movement that was successful in promoting a bicycle friendly and sustainable city, yet dissolved due to lack of people involved, and the bicycle demonstrations stopped at a moment of high public interest. This empirical puzzle is addressed by combining three theoretical perspectives: Kathleen Blee's work on path dependencies in nascent activist groups; Nina Eliasoph and Paul Lichterman's work on group styles, and Laurent Thévenot's work on the grammars of commonality. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1468-4446.12606
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12606DOI Listing
November 2018
12 Reads

Educational assortative mating: a micro-educational approach.

Br J Sociol 2018 Nov 8. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

The Danish Center for Social Science Research (VIVE).

This article presents a new way of analysing educational assortative mating patterns, using a detailed 'micro-educational' classification capturing both hierarchical and horizontal forms of educational differentiation. Taking advantage of rich Danish population data, we apply log-linear models that include four ways of measuring educational homogamy patterns: (a) by returns to education, (b) by macro-education (five aggregated levels), (c) by field of study (16 categories), and (d) by a disaggregated micro-educational classification, combining levels and fields of study (54 groups). Our results show declines in educational homogamy from 1984 to 2013, but the odds ratios of being educationally homogamous at the university college and university levels remain of substantial magnitude, by both the macro- and micro-educational measures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12488DOI Listing
November 2018
17 Reads

The Islamic worlds of welfare.

Br J Sociol 2018 Oct 31. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

New York University Abu Dhabi.

Studying the varieties of welfare can offer surprising insights in the workings and tensions of Islamist social movements in such major countries as Iran, Egypt, and Turkey. Based on extensive fieldwork and (for Iran) the batteries of socio-economic data, the recent monographs of sociologists Kevan Harris and Cihan Tuğal offer a high-resolution yet panoramic overview. Harris re-positions the Iranian historical 'improvisation called Islamic Republic' as the 'warfare/welfare state' forged in the sacrificial defense against Saddam Hussein's onslaught in the 1980s. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1468-4446.12608
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12608DOI Listing
October 2018
5 Reads

Political entrepreneurship in the field of Māori sovereignty in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Authors:
Thomas O'Brien

Br J Sociol 2018 Oct 30. Epub 2018 Oct 30.

Department of Sociology, University of York.

Individual actors have the potential to shape political outcomes through creative use of opportunities. Political entrepreneurship identifies how such actors recognize and exploit opportunities, for personal or collective gain. The existing literature focuses on individuals operating within institutional settings, with less attention paid to other types of actors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12611DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

How states tighten control: a field theory perspective on journalism in contemporary Crimea.

Authors:
Olga Zeveleva

Br J Sociol 2018 Oct 26. Epub 2018 Oct 26.

Newnham College, University of Cambridge, Sidgwick Ave, Cambridge, CB3 9DF.

This article contributes to denationalizing Bourdieu's field theory by analysing the relationship between a regional news media field, the state and transnational influences. The article seeks to answer the question of how a state can impose limits on the autonomy of the news media field during political transition. Field theory is applied to changes that have taken place in Crimean news media since Russia's annexation of the peninsula in 2014. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12615DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Investigative ignorance in international investigations: how United Nations Panels of Experts create new relations of power by seeking information.

Br J Sociol 2018 Dec 25;69(4):984-1006. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

CIPSS, McGill University.

How do political investigations affect relations of power? Earlier studies have focused on the empowering effects of political knowledge - in contrast, I analyse how the pursuit of such knowledge makes the investigator dependent on others. I hypothesize that where the will to know empowers others, ignorance becomes a strategic alternative. This mechanism should play out strongly at the intersection of global governance and local political crises: here, global governance actors lack knowledge, investigations often constitute the first direct interaction between actors from both sides, and solidification of power (instead of empowering others) should be a central interest of global governance actors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12603DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Groups and individuals: conformity and diversity in the performance of gendered identities.

Br J Sociol 2018 Oct 23. Epub 2018 Oct 23.

Cardiff School of Social Sciences, Glamorgan Building, King Edward VII Avenue, Cardiff, CF10 3WT.

The nature and role of social groups is a central tension in sociology. On the one hand, the idea of a group enables sociologists to locate and describe individuals in terms of characteristics that are shared with others. On the other, emphasizing the fluidity of categories such as gender or ethnicity undermines their legitimacy as ways of classifying people and, by extension, the legitimacy of categorization as a goal of sociological research. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1468-4446.12507
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12507DOI Listing
October 2018
13 Reads

Structural and motivational mechanisms of academic achievement: a mediation model of social-background effects on academic achievement.

Br J Sociol 2018 Oct 17. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich.

This paper takes up ongoing discussions on the inequality of educational opportunities and formulates a conceptual model to link separate lines of research. Our particular focus is on combining motivational and structural approaches into a mediation model that explains differences in academic achievement. In the literature, four main mechanisms of social reproduction are discussed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12506DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

The social life of DNA: racial reconciliation and institutional morality after the genome.

Authors:
Alondra Nelson

Br J Sociol 2018 Sep 17;69(3):522-537. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Columbia University and Social Science Research Council.

This 2017 British Journal of Sociology Lecture builds upon ideas developed in The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation after the Genome (Nelson 2016). I argue that one of the more significant developments of the postgenomic era is the circulation of DNA analysis outside of the life sciences, especially commercial applications such as direct-to-consumer genealogical testing. These tests are increasingly taken up in 'reconciliation projects' - endeavours in which DNA analysis is put to the use of repairing the past, including a recently launched attempt in the United States to locate descendants of enslaved persons sold by the Jesuit stewards of Georgetown College in order to bolster that institution's finances. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12607DOI Listing
September 2018
13 Reads

Risking safety and rights: online sex work, crimes and 'blended safety repertoires'.

Br J Sociol 2018 Oct 14. Epub 2018 Oct 14.

University of Leicester.

It has been well established that those working in the sex industry are at various risks of violence and crime depending on where they sell sex and the environments in which they work. What sociological research has failed to address is how crime and safety have been affected by the dynamic changing nature of sex work given the dominance of the internet and digital technologies, including the development of new markets such as webcamming. This paper reports the most comprehensive findings on the internet-based sex market in the UK demonstrating types of crimes experienced by internet-based sex workers and the strategies of risk management that sex workers adopt, building on our article in the British Journal of Sociology in 2007. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12493DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

A post-liberal theory of stratification.

Br J Sociol 2018 Dec 11;69(4):1096-1133. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

Stanford University.

The iconic 'liberal theory' of stratification fails to attend to the many types of downward mobility and wage loss generated by late-industrial stratification systems. Although the liberal theory and its close cousins assume that loss and failure will be interpreted in individualistic terms, recent developments suggest instead that they are generating solidary groups that are increasingly locked into zero-sum contest and successfully mobilized by politicians and other norm entrepreneurs. These developments imply a Marxisant future for late-industrial inequality that bears scant resemblance to the highly individualized, unstructured, and non-conflictual stratification system envisaged by the liberal theory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12505DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Race, Rome and the genome.

Authors:
Jenny Reardon

Br J Sociol 2018 Sep 11;69(3):565-574. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

University of California, Santa Cruz.

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1468-4446.12601
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12601DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

The social life of DNA: racial reconciliation and institutional morality after the genome - a response.

Authors:
Alondra Nelson

Br J Sociol 2018 Sep 11;69(3):575-579. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

Columbia University, Sociology.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12612DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

How do international lawyers handle facts? The role of folk sociological theories at the International Criminal Court.

Authors:
Julien Seroussi

Br J Sociol 2018 Dec 9;69(4):962-983. Epub 2018 Oct 9.

Génocide, Crime contre l'humanité et Crimes et délits de guerre, Tribunal de Grande Instance de Paris.

The International Criminal Court (ICC) investigates international crimes committed in different parts of the world. Earlier scholarly analysis of the work performed by the ICC judges has pointed out that judges often lack cultural and national understanding of the local norms and customs of regions where defendants come from. This article treats this lack of contextual knowledge displayed by the court as a case of structural ignorance rather than an aberration to be 'exposed' or censured. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1468-4446.12604
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12604DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Strategic ignorance and global governance: an ecumenical approach to epistemologies of global power.

Br J Sociol 2018 Dec 9;69(4):884-909. Epub 2018 Oct 9.

University of Essex.

How can we account for the role of ignorance and knowledge in global governance? It is a contention of earlier scholarship in international relations and political sociology that knowledge production is tightly coupled with rational action - regardless of whether knowledge widely influences different stakeholders or not. This scholarship equally tends to assume an ignorance-knowledge binary relationship that associates ignorance with powerlessness and knowledge with power. This is a view we dispute. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1468-4446.12504
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12504DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Developing a critical trans gerontology.

Authors:
Michael Toze

Br J Sociol 2018 Oct 9. Epub 2018 Oct 9.

University of Lincoln.

Within existing academic literature, ageing within trans populations has primarily been addressed from the perspective of offering advice to service providers and clinicians, with relatively limited application of critical sociological perspectives. This article seeks to integrate the critical perspectives on gerontology with transfeminism, identifying areas of commonality regarding accounts of an integrated lifecourse, scepticism of biomedicalization, and an emphasis on local context. The article suggests that this integration provides a fruitful basis for developing future research into the study of trans ageing, and also provides theoretical development across many debates around age, gender and the lifecourse. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1468-4446.12491
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12491DOI Listing
October 2018
6 Reads

Money and relationships online: communication and norm formation in women's discussions of couple resource allocation.

Br J Sociol 2018 Oct 7. Epub 2018 Oct 7.

Birmingham Business School.

Research on intra-household resource allocation practices has largely ignored the role of communication within but especially beyond the household. This article shows that discussions engaged in outside of the household shed light on intra-household deliberation and also contribute to an understanding of how norms are formed and used in discussions and negotiations. Using data from the website Mumsnet, and grounding our analysis in a framework that combines the literature on gender norms in allocation practices with insights from the study of online communication, we contribute to the sociological literature on household distribution in three ways: first, we show that women use discussion sites like Mumsnet to clarify and sometimes contest social norms regarding money and relationships; second, we show that users conceive the ability to communicate with partners as a source of 'relationship power' and use online discussion with other women to develop that skill; third, we argue that sites like Mumsnet provide fresh insights into household resource allocation processes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12492DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

The IMF failure that wasn't: risk ignorance during the European debt crisis.

Authors:
Pierre Pénet

Br J Sociol 2018 Dec 6;69(4):1031-1055. Epub 2018 Oct 6.

Paul Bairoch Institute of Economic History, University of Geneva, 40, Boulevard du Pont d'Arve, CH - 1205, Genève.

This article builds on ignorance studies to revisit how we understand the role of expertise in international policymaking. A fundamental component of ignorance is concealing what you know. For experts, risk ignorance is a strategic resource when the policymaking process becomes a contested exchange. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12602DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Plausible folk theories: throwing veils of plausibility over zones of ignorance in global governance.

Br J Sociol 2018 Dec 5;69(4):936-961. Epub 2018 Oct 5.

American Bar Foundation.

In an age of expertise, where knowledge ostensibly reigns, global governance not infrequently settles for ignorance. To understand this puzzle, this article draws upon extensive empirical research on two sites within the global governance of finance. One is directed to the suppression of money laundering and combating the financing of terrorism by the Financial Action Task Force and International Monetary Fund. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1468-4446.12605
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12605DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Morality in racialized institutions.

Authors:
James R Jones

Br J Sociol 2018 Sep 5;69(3):560-564. Epub 2018 Oct 5.

Rutgers University-Newark, Department of African American Studies and Sociology.

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1468-4446.12598
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12598DOI Listing
September 2018
3 Reads

DNA, reconciliation and social empowerment.

Authors:
Yulia Egorova

Br J Sociol 2018 Sep 5;69(3):545-551. Epub 2018 Oct 5.

Durham University.

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1468-4446.12597
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12597DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Antagonistic recursivities and successive cover-ups: the case of private nuclear proliferation.

Br J Sociol 2018 Dec 5;69(4):1007-1030. Epub 2018 Oct 5.

Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies.

"Legal recursivity" is a concept introduced by socio-legal scholars to capture the progressive elaboration of transnational rules through policy linkages at the international and domestic levels, and the associated jurisdictional expansion of international institutions to new policy areas. Recursivity can take many forms, and this article introduces the concept of "antagonistic recursivity" to capture a dual process of recursive legal innovation and antagonistic obstruction by the same policy actors. The article shows how such antagonistic recursivity worked in the case of the global fight against private nuclear proliferators after the 2003 revelations about the reach of the A. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1468-4446.12494
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12494DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

The uses of disorder in negotiated information orders: information leveraging and changing norms in global public health governance.

Authors:
Carol A Heimer

Br J Sociol 2018 Dec 4;69(4):910-935. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

Northwestern University and American Bar Foundation.

The SARS epidemic that broke out in late 2002 in China's Guangdong Province highlighted the difficulties of reliance on state-provided information when states have incentives to conceal discrediting information about public health threats. Using SARS and the International Health Regulations (IHR) as a starting point, this article examines negotiated information orders in global public health governance and the irregularities in the supply of data that underlie them. Negotiated information orders within and among the organizations in a field (here, e. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1468-4446.12495
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12495DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads