4,505 results match your criteria Tardive Dyskinesia


The role of glutamate receptors and their interactions with dopamine and other neurotransmitters in the development of tardive dyskinesia: preclinical and clinical results.

Behav Pharmacol 2020 May 25. Epub 2020 May 25.

Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience (CFIN), University of Aarhus, 8000 Aarhus, Denmark.

Tardive dyskinesia is a serious, disabling, movement disorder associated with the ongoing use of antipsychotic medication. Current evidence regarding the pathophysiology of tardive dyskinesia is mainly based on preclinical animal models and is still not completely understood. The leading preclinical hypothesis of tardive dyskinesia development includes dopaminergic imbalance in the direct and indirect pathways of the basal ganglia, cholinergic deficiency, serotonin receptor disturbances, neurotoxicity, oxidative stress, and changes in synaptic plasticity. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/FBP.0000000000000563DOI Listing

Pharmacologic Treatment of Tardive Dyskinesia: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review.

J Clin Psychiatry 2020 May 26;81(4). Epub 2020 May 26.

Yale Child Study Center, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

Objective: To examine the efficacy of pharmacologic treatments for tardive dyskinesia (TD).

Data Sources: PubMed was searched on December 12, 2017, for randomized, placebo-controlled trials examining the treatment of TD using the search terms (drug-induced dyskinesia OR tardive dyskinesia) AND (psychotic disorders OR schizophrenia).

Study Selection: Studies were included if they examined tardive dyskinesia treatment as the primary outcome and were randomized and placebo-controlled trials. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.19r12798DOI Listing

VMAT2 inhibitors for the treatment of hyperkinetic movement disorders.

Pharmacol Ther 2020 May 23:107580. Epub 2020 May 23.

Neurology and Basic Sciences, Division of Movement Disorders, Department of Neurology, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Faculty Medical Offices, 11370 Anderson, Suite B-100, Loma Linda, CA 92350, United States of America. Electronic address:

Hyperkinetic movement disorders comprise a variety of conditions characterized by involuntary movements, which include but are not limited to tardive dyskinesia, chorea associated with Huntington's Disease, and tic disorders. The class of medications that have been used to treat these conditions includes Vesicular Monoamine Transporter-2 (VMAT2) inhibitors. In 2008, the FDA approved tetrabenazine as a treatment for chorea associated with Huntington's Disease. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pharmthera.2020.107580DOI Listing

A long-term, open-label study of valbenazine for tardive dyskinesia.

CNS Spectr 2020 May 18:1-9. Epub 2020 May 18.

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc., San Diego, California, USA.

Background.: Individuals with tardive dyskinesia (TD) who completed a long-term study (KINECT 3 or KINECT 4) of valbenazine (40 or 80 mg/day, once-daily for up to 48 weeks followed by 4-week washout) were enrolled in a subsequent study (NCT02736955) that was primarily designed to further evaluate the long-term safety of valbenazine.

Methods. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S109285292000108XDOI Listing

Schizophrenia-associated gene dysbindin-1 and tardive dyskinesia.

Drug Dev Res 2020 May 11. Epub 2020 May 11.

Tanenbaum Centre for Pharmacogenetics, Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a potentially irreversible movement disorder observed following long-term antipsychotic exposure. Its cause is unknown; however, a genetic component has been supported by studies of affected families. Dysbindin-1, encoded by the dystrobrevin-binding protein 1 DTNBP1 gene, has been associated with schizophrenia and is potentially involved in dopamine neurotransmission through its regulation of dopamine release and dopamine D2 receptor recycling, making it a candidate for investigation in TD. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddr.21681DOI Listing

5-Hydroxytryptamine Receptors and Tardive Dyskinesia in Schizophrenia.

Front Mol Neurosci 2020 24;13:63. Epub 2020 Apr 24.

Mental Health Research Institute, Tomsk National Research Medical Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia.

Background: Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a common side effect of antipsychotic treatment. This movement disorder consists of orofacial and limb-truncal components. The present study is aimed at investigating the role of serotonin receptors (HTR) in modulating tardive dyskinesia by genotyping patients with schizophrenia. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnmol.2020.00063DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7193905PMC

Association of Cholinergic Muscarinic M4 Receptor Gene Polymorphism with Schizophrenia.

Appl Clin Genet 2020 22;13:97-105. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

Mental Health Research Institute, Tomsk National Research Medical Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russian Federation.

Background: Previous studies have linked muscarinic M4 receptors (CHRM4) to schizophrenia. Specifically, the rs2067482 polymorphism was found to be highly associated with this disease.

Purpose: To test whether rs2067482 and rs72910092 are potential risk factors for schizophrenia and/or pharmacogenetic markers for antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/TACG.S247174DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7183770PMC

RE-KINECT: A Prospective Study of the Presence and Healthcare Burden of Tardive Dyskinesia in Clinical Practice Settings.

J Clin Psychopharmacol 2020 May/Jun;40(3):259-268

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc, San Diego, CA.

Purpose/background: RE-KINECT (NCT03062033) was designed to assess the presence and impact of possible tardive dyskinesia (TD) in antipsychotic-treated outpatients.

Methods/procedures: The study included adults with 3 or more months of lifetime antipsychotic exposure and 1 or more psychiatric disorder. Based on clinician observation and assessment, patients were assigned to cohort 1 (without involuntary movements or with non-TD involuntary movements) or cohort 2 (with involuntary movements confirmed by clinician as possible TD). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JCP.0000000000001201DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7190052PMC

123 Long-Term Outcomes with Valbenazine 40 mg/day in Adults With Tardive Dyskinesia.

CNS Spectr 2020 Apr;25(2):279-280

Medical Director, Medical Affairs, Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc., San Diego, CA.

Study Objective: Tardive dyskinesia (TD), a persistent and potentially disabling movement disorder, is associated with prolonged exposure to antipsychotics and other dopamine receptor blocking agents. Valbenazine (VBZ) is a novel and highly selective vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) inhibitor approved for the treatment of TD in adults. Using data from two long-term phase 3 studies (KINECT 3 [K3], NCT02274558; KINECT 4 [K4], NCT02405091) and a rollover study (1506, NCT02736955), the long-term outcomes of once-daily VBZ on TD were examined in participants who received 40mg or had a dose reduction from 80 to 40mg. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1092852920000413DOI Listing

105 Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Possible Tardive Dyskinesia Based on Patient and Clinician Assessments.

CNS Spectr 2020 Apr;25(2):268-269

Senior Director, Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc., San Diego, CA.

Study Objective: Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a persistent and potentially disabling movement disorder associated with prolonged antipsychotic use. RE KINECT, a real-world screening study of antipsychotic-treated outpatients, included patients with movements that were clinician-confirmed as possible TD (Cohort 2) and patients with no involuntary movements (Cohort 1). Baseline data from the patient rated EuroQoL 5-Dimension 5-Level questionnaire (EQ-5D-5L) and Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) were analyzed to evaluate health related quality of life (Cohort 2 vs. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1092852920000231DOI Listing

134 Long-Term Deutetrabenazine Treatment Is Associated with Sustained Treatment Response in Tardive Dyskinesia: Results from an Open-Label Extension Study.

CNS Spectr 2020 Apr;25(2):284-285

Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.

Background: In the 12-week ARM-TD and AIM-TD studies evaluating deutetrabenazine for the treatment of tardive dyskinesia (TD), the percentage of patients achieving ≥50% response was higher in the deutetrabenazine-treated group than in the placebo group. These studies also showed low rates of overall adverse events (AEs) and discontinuations associated with deutetrabenazine. The current open-label study evaluated the long-term efficacy and safety of deutetrabenazine in patients with TD. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1092852920000504DOI Listing

151 Confirmed Safety of Deutet.rabenazine for Tardive Dyskinesia in a 3-Year Open-Label Extension Study.

CNS Spectr 2020 Apr;25(2):296-297

Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.

Background: Deutetrabenazine (Austedo) is approved by the FDA for treatment of tardive dyskinesia (TD) in adults. In the 12-week ARM-TD and AIM-TD studies, deutetrabenazine showed clinically significant improvements in Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) scores compared with placebo, and there were low rates of overall adverse events (AEs) and discontinuations associated with deutetrabenazine. The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term safety and tolerability of deutetrabenazine in patients with TD at 3 years. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S109285292000067XDOI Listing

152 Development of Deutetrabenazine as a Potential New Non-Antipsychotic Treatment for Tourette Syndrome in Children and Adolescents.

CNS Spectr 2020 Apr;25(2):297

Teva Pharmaceuticals, Basel, Switzerland.

Background: Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by the hyperkinetic movements of motor and phonic tics manifested in young age. Currently approved treatments in the United States are antipsychotics: haloperidol, pimozide, and aripiprazole, which are associated with serious side effects, including tardive dyskinesia (TD). Deutetrabenazine, a vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) inhibitor, was approved in 2017 by the US FDA for the treatment of chorea associated with Huntington's disease and TD. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1092852920000681DOI Listing

116 An Experimental Study to Assess the Professional and Social Consequences of Tardive Dyskinesia.

CNS Spectr 2020 Apr;25(2):275-276

Director, Austedo® HEOR Lead, Teva Pharmaceuticals, Frazer, Pennsylvania.

Study Objective: Evaluate the impact of orofacial tardive dyskinesia (TD) symptoms on the professional and social lives of patients with TD.

Background: TD, a movement disorder affecting the face and extremities, may arise in patients taking antipsychotics. The impact of social stigma on the professional and social lives of patients with orofacial manifestations of TD has not been thoroughly examined. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1092852920000346DOI Listing

139 Early Response with Valbenazine and Long-Term Symptom Reduction in Patients with Tardive Dyskinesia: Post Hoc Analysis of the KINECT 3 Study.

CNS Spectr 2020 Apr;25(2):288-289

Medical Director, Medical Affairs, Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc., San Diego, CA.

Study Objective: Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a persistent and potentially disabling movement disorder associated with prolonged exposure to antipsychotics and other dopamine receptor blocking agents. Valbenazine is a highly selective vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) inhibitor approved for the treatment of TD in adults. Using data from a long-term study (KINECT 3; NCT02274558), the effects of once-daily valbenazine (40 mg, 80 mg) on TD were assessed using the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) in participants who were early responders based on subjective measures, including patient self-report (Patient Global Impression of Change [PGIC]) or clinician judgment (Clinical Impression of Change-Tardive Dyskinesia [CGI-TD]). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1092852920000553DOI Listing

115 An Experimental Study to Assess the Professional and Social Consequences of Mild-to-Moderate Tardive Dyskinesia.

CNS Spectr 2020 Apr;25(2):275

Director, Austedo® HEOR Lead, Teva Pharmaceuticals, Frazer, Pennsylvania.

Study Objective: To Evaluate the impact of mild-to-moderate orofacial tardive dyskinesia (TD) symptoms on the people and social lives of people with TD.

Background: TD, a movement disorder affecting the face and extremities, may arise in patients taking antipsychotics. The impact of stigma on the professional and social lives of people with moderate-to-severe TD was previously examined, but has not been investigated in those with mild-to-moderate TD. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1092852920000334DOI Listing

Risk of Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome with Vesicular Monoamine Transporter Inhibitors.

Authors:
Stanley N Caroff

Clin Psychopharmacol Neurosci 2020 May;18(2):322-326

Department of Psychiatry, Corporal Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center and University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Objective: Vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2) inhibitors have been proven to be effective for the treatment of tardive dyskinesia and their use is likely to increase. The evidence base of published clinical reports was reviewed to evaluate the possible risk of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) with these drugs.

Methods: Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science and PsycINFO databases were queried for all years using terms for "neuroleptic malignant syndrome", "hyperthermia" AND "vesicular monoamine transporter inhibitors", "reserpine", "tetrabenazine", "valbenazine" or "deutetrabenazine". Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.9758/cpn.2020.18.2.322DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7242105PMC

Pyrosequencing analysis of IRS1 methylation levels in schizophrenia with tardive dyskinesia.

Mol Med Rep 2020 Apr 12;21(4):1702-1708. Epub 2020 Feb 12.

Beijing Huilongguan Hospital, Peking University Huilongguan Clinical Medical School, Beijing 100096, P.R. China.

Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a serious side effect of certain antipsychotic medications that are used to treat schizophrenia (SCZ) and other mental illnesses. The methylation status of the insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) gene is reportedly associated with SCZ; however, no study, to the best of the authors' knowledge, has focused on the quantitative DNA methylation levels of the IRS1 gene using pyrosequencing in SCZ with or without TD. The present study aimed to quantify DNA methylation levels of 4 CpG sites in the IRS1 gene using a Chinese sample including SCZ patients with TD and without TD (NTD) and healthy controls (HCs). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2020.10984DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7057828PMC

Treatment of Tardive Dyskinesia.

Neurol Clin 2020 05 28;38(2):379-396. Epub 2020 Feb 28.

Department of Neurology, Baylor College of Medicine, Parkinson's Disease Center and Movement Disorders Clinic, 7200 Cambridge, 9th Floor, Suite 9A, Houston, TX 77030-4202, USA. Electronic address:

Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is an iatrogenic condition that encompasses a wide phenomenological spectrum of movement disorders caused by exposure to dopamine receptor blocking agents (DRBAs). TD may cause troublesome or disabling symptoms that impair quality of life. Due to frequent, often inappropriate, use of DRBAs, TD prevalence rates among patients exposed to DRBAs continue to be high. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ncl.2020.01.004DOI Listing

Clinical Rating Scales and Quantitative Assessments of Movement Disorders.

Authors:
Arjun Tarakad

Neurol Clin 2020 05 6;38(2):231-254. Epub 2020 Feb 6.

Department of Neurology, Parkinson's Disease Center and Movement Disorders Clinic, Baylor College of Medicine, 7200 Cambridge Street Suite 9A, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address:

This article reviews scales that have been developed for, validated in, and/or frequently used across multiple movement disorders with a focus on assessment of motor and nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease. Rating scales used in other disease states include those for essential tremor, dystonia (generalized dystonia, cervical dystonia, and blepharospasm), Tourette syndrome, Huntington disease, tardive dyskinesia, Wilson disease, ataxia, and functional movement disorders. Key features of each scale as well as cited criticisms and limitations of each scale are also discussed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ncl.2019.12.001DOI Listing

Investigation of the effects of cannabidiol on vacuous chewing movements, locomotion, oxidative stress and blood glucose in rats treated with oral haloperidol.

World J Biol Psychiatry 2020 May 5:1-15. Epub 2020 May 5.

Department of Biochemistry, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research Yaba Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria.

Tardive dyskinesia (TD) unlike acute dystonia may be irreversible. This study investigated the effects of oral cannabidiol (CBD) on haloperidol-induced vacuous chewing movement (VCM) model of TD. There were six experimental groups with different combinations of oral cannabidiol with 5 mg/kg of haloperidol given orally. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15622975.2020.1752934DOI Listing

Comparative Tolerability of Dopamine D2/3 Receptor Partial Agonists for Schizophrenia.

CNS Drugs 2020 May;34(5):473-507

Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia.

Aripiprazole, brexpiprazole and cariprazine differ from all other second-generation antipsychotics due to partial agonism at the dopamine D2 and D3 receptors. In contrast to aripiprazole, brexpiprazole has lower intrinsic dopamine D2 activity and higher affinity for the serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors, while cariprazine has the highest affinity for the dopamine D3 receptor, and the longest half-life. The main adverse effect of dopamine receptor partial agonists (DRPAs) is akathisia of low-to-moderate severity, which occurs in a small proportion of patients, usually in the first few weeks of treatment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40263-020-00718-4DOI Listing

Abdominal Wall Dyskinesia: Case Report.

Case Rep Neurol 2020 Jan-Apr;12(1):69-72. Epub 2020 Feb 14.

Department of Neurology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, USA.

The clinical presentation of repetitive choreiform involuntary movements of the anterior abdominal wall was first introduced as "belly dancer's dyskinesia." Etiologies of this rare condition include idiopathic causes, medication inducement, or post-abdominal surgery. We report a case of orobuccal stereotypic movements and abdominal wall dyskinesia secondary to prochlorperazine intake. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000504336DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098346PMC
February 2020

A unifying theory for the pathoetiologic mechanism of tardive dyskinesia.

Med Hypotheses 2020 Mar 16;140:109682. Epub 2020 Mar 16.

Mood Disorders Research Program, Depression Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY, United States.

Introduction: Chronic treatment with dopamine D2 receptor antagonists has been proposed to lead to dopamine receptor supersensitivity. Frequently, this is conceptualized as upregulation or changes in the structure or function of the post-synaptic D2 receptor. However, the measured 1. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2020.109682DOI Listing

Pharmacokinetic and Metabolic Profile of Deutetrabenazine (TEV-50717) Compared With Tetrabenazine in Healthy Volunteers.

Clin Transl Sci 2020 Mar 10. Epub 2020 Mar 10.

Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, Netanya, Israel.

Deutetrabenazine (Austedo, Teva Pharmaceuticals) is a deuterated form of tetrabenazine. It is the first deuterated drug to receive US regulatory approval and is approved for treatment of chorea in Huntington's disease and tardive dyskinesia. Two oral single dose studies comparing deutetrabenazine (25 mg) with tetrabenazine (25 mg) in healthy volunteers evaluated the impact of deuteration on pharmacokinetics of the active metabolites, alpha-dihydrotetrabenazine (α-HTBZ) and beta-dihydrotetrabenazine (β-HTBZ), metabolite profile, safety, and tolerability. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cts.12754DOI Listing

Use of Valbenazine in a 54-Year-Old Female with Severe Tardive Dyskinesia.

Cureus 2020 Jan 28;12(1):e6801. Epub 2020 Jan 28.

Psychiatry, Reading Hospital Tower Health, West Reading, USA.

Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a serious and often irreversible involuntary muscle movement that involves the face, lips, tongue, trunk, and extremities. TD is a risk in the use of antipsychotic medications, whether it is typical or first generation or atypical or second-generation antipsychotic. The risk is highest in patients receiving long-term antipsychotic treatment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.6801DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7045975PMC
January 2020

Unilateral akathisia and choreoathetosis as an unusual presentation of a frontal lobe dermoid cyst.

Br J Neurosurg 2020 Feb 25:1-2. Epub 2020 Feb 25.

Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK.

To consider an unusual presentation of a frontal lobe dermoid cyst. Intracranial masses very rarely present with movement disorders. We describe a highly unusual presentation of an intracranial dermoid with unilateral choreoathetosis, akathisia and facial tics. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02688697.2020.1729958DOI Listing
February 2020

Effects of NBI-98782, a selective vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) inhibitor, on neurotransmitter efflux and phencyclidine-induced locomotor activity: Relevance to tardive dyskinesia and antipsychotic action.

Pharmacol Biochem Behav 2020 03 18;190:172872. Epub 2020 Feb 18.

Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Pharmacology, and Physiology, School of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60611, United States of America. Electronic address:

Valbenazine, a vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2, SLC18A2) inhibitor, is a newly approved treatment for tardive dyskinesia. VMAT2 is present in the membrane of secretory vesicles and transports dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), serotonin (5-HT), histamine, glutamate (Glu), and GABA into vesicles for presynaptic release. We utilized microdialysis in awake, freely moving mice to determine the effect of NBI-98782, the active metabolite of valbenazine, alone, or in combination with several antipsychotic drugs (APDs), to influence neurotransmitter efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), dorsal striatum (dSTR), hippocampus and nucleus accumbens (NAC); we also compared it with tetrabenazine, the prototypical VMAT2 inhibitor. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pbb.2020.172872DOI Listing

Revisiting Tardive Dyskinesia: Focusing on the Basics of Identification and Treatment.

J Clin Psychiatry 2020 Feb 18;81(2). Epub 2020 Feb 18.

Pharmacotherapy Division, The University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy, Austin, Texas, USA.

The use of second-generation antipsychotics has not eliminated tardive dyskinesia (TD), and the prevalence of the disorder is higher than commonly realized. The involuntary movements of TD can decrease patients' quality of life, cause embarrassment, and lead to social withdrawal. Clinicians must evaluate patients taking DRBAs for TD risk factors and regularly screen them for TD using a rating scale. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.TV18059AH3CDOI Listing
February 2020

Time for a New Slate in Tardive Dyskinesia Research.

Mov Disord 2020 May 18;35(5):752-755. Epub 2020 Feb 18.

Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mds.28003DOI Listing

Teaching Video NeuroImages: Tardive diaphragmatic tremor.

Authors:
Harsh V Gupta

Neurology 2020 02 30;94(6):e656. Epub 2020 Jan 30.

From the Department of Neurology, Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000008761DOI Listing
February 2020

Medication Options and Clinical Strategies for Treating Tardive Dyskinesia.

Authors:
Leslie L Citrome

J Clin Psychiatry 2020 Jan 28;81(2). Epub 2020 Jan 28.

Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, New York Medical College, Valhalla.

Valbenazine and deutetrabenazine are FDA-approved as treatment for tardive dyskinesia (TD). Both medications are vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) inhibitors, and both are effective for reducing TD symptoms. Clinicians need to be aware of the adverse effects of valbenazine and deutetrabenazine, as well as other key differences between the two, in order to individualize treatment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.TV18059BR2CDOI Listing
January 2020

A Modified Delphi Consensus Study of the Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Tardive Dyskinesia.

J Clin Psychiatry 2020 Jan 28;81(2). Epub 2020 Jan 28.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.

Objective: A nominal group process followed by a modified Delphi method was used to survey expert opinions on best practices for tardive dyskinesia (TD) screening, diagnosis, and treatment and to identify areas lacking in clinical evidence.

Participants: A steering committee of 11 TD experts met in nominal group format to prioritize questions to be addressed and identify core bibliographic materials and criteria for survey panelists. Of 60 invited experts, 29 (23 psychiatrists and 6 neurologists) agreed to participate. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.19cs12983DOI Listing
January 2020

Early Recognition and Treatment of Tardive Dyskinesia in Patients With Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia.

J Clin Psychiatry 2020 Jan 28;81(1). Epub 2020 Jan 28.

​​​​Early Recognition and Treatment of Tardive Dyskinesia in Patients With Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia Click to enlarge page​​. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.NU18041AH5CDOI Listing
January 2020

Methamphetamine Use and Antipsychotic-related Extrapyramidal Side-effects in Patients with Psychotic Disorders.

J Dual Diagn 2020 Apr-Jun;16(2):208-217. Epub 2020 Jan 26.

Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.

Extrapyramidal side-effects (EPSE) are frequent in patients treated with antipsychotics and comorbid substance use disorders (SUDs). Methamphetamine has been shown to act as a dopaminergic neurotoxin. We aimed to determine whether EPSE occur more often in patients with psychotic disorders and co-occurring methamphetamine (MA) use disorders, and we examined the relationship between MA use, antipsychotic type, dose and EPSE. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15504263.2020.1714099DOI Listing
January 2020

Comment on Akbar et al., "Valbenazine-induced parkinsonism".

Authors:
Chirag Shah

Parkinsonism Relat Disord 2020 02 21;71:35. Epub 2020 Jan 21.

Strategic Publications & Medical Education, Medical Affairs, Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc, 12780 El Camino Real, San Diego, CA, 92130, USA. Electronic address:

This letter to the editor acknowledges the contribution of Akbar et al. to the field of tardive dyskinesia (TD) and provides important regulatory information about the potential for parkinson-like symptoms in patients with TD who are treated with valbenazine. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2020.01.011DOI Listing
February 2020

Valbenazine and deutetrabenazine: Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 inhibitors for tardive dyskinesia.

Am J Health Syst Pharm 2020 Jan;77(3):167-174

Department of Pharmacy, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA.

Purpose: The purpose of this review is to summarize the current evidence for valbenazine and deutetrabenazine use for the treatment of tardive dyskinesia (TD).

Summary: A literature search was conducted to gather relevant data regarding the use of valbenazine and deutetrabenazine for TD management. PubMed, MEDLINE, and ClinicalTrials. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajhp/zxz299DOI Listing
January 2020

Identifying Tardive Dyskinesia: Risk Factors, Functional Impact, and Diagnostic Tools.

Authors:
Stephen R Saklad

J Clin Psychiatry 2020 Jan 14;81(1). Epub 2020 Jan 14.

Pharmacotherapy Division, The University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy, Austin, Texas, USA.

Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is an involuntary movement disorder induced by dopamine-receptor blocking agents (DRBAs), including antipsychotics. Because the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics has reduced but not eliminated the risk for TD as had been hoped, recognizing and treating TD are important skills for clinicians. Many patients rely on DRBAs for chronic conditions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.TV18059BR1CDOI Listing
January 2020

Association of regulatory variants of dopamine β-hydroxylase with cognition and tardive dyskinesia in schizophrenia subjects.

J Psychopharmacol 2020 Mar 8;34(3):358-369. Epub 2020 Jan 8.

Department of Genetics, University of Delhi South Campus, New Delhi, India.

Background: Dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH, EC 1.14.17. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0269881119895539DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7150076PMC

Treatment Strategies for Tardive Dyskinesia.

Authors:
Daniel E Kremens

J Clin Psychiatry 2019 Dec 24;81(1). Epub 2019 Dec 24.

Department of Neurology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Tardive dyskinesia (TD), a condition of potentially irreversible abnormal involuntary movements that is associated with dopamine receptor blocking agents (DRBAs), produces significant impairment of functioning and quality of life for patients. Contrary to expectations, TD has not vanished despite the introduction of SGAs. Instead, changing prescription practices and increased off-label prescription of DRBAs have placed more patients than ever at risk of this potentially dangerous and disabling condition. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.NU18041BR4CDOI Listing
December 2019

Models of hyperkinetic disorders in primates.

Authors:
Erwan Bezard

J Neurosci Methods 2020 Feb 16;332:108551. Epub 2019 Dec 16.

Univ. de Bordeaux, Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives, UMR 5293, F-33000 Bordeaux, France; CNRS, Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives, UMR 5293, F-33000 Bordeaux, France. Electronic address:

Hyperkinetic movement disorders include tremors, dystonia, chorea, tics, myoclonus, stereotypies, restless legs syndrome, and various other disorders with abnormal involuntary movements. Although several disorders could be included in such a broad spectrum, a limited number of conditions are modeled in non-human primates. These disabling conditions include notably L-dopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease, tardive dyskinesia, essential tremor and Huntington's disease. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneumeth.2019.108551DOI Listing
February 2020

FDA-Approved Medications to Treat Tardive Dyskinesia.

Authors:
Joseph P McEvoy

J Clin Psychiatry 2019 Dec 17;81(1). Epub 2019 Dec 17.

Department of Psychiatry and Health Behavior, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia, USA.

Tardive dyskinesia (TD), a condition characterized by involuntary movements, is found in patients taking antipsychotics or other agents that block dopamine receptors. Symptoms of TD are associated with reduced quality of life, psychosocial problems, and medication nonadherence. Few agents tested in the treatment of TD had sufficient data to support or refute their use, until recently. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.NU18041BR3CDOI Listing
December 2019

Association Study of the Complement Component C4 Gene in Tardive Dyskinesia.

Front Pharmacol 2019 26;10:1339. Epub 2019 Nov 26.

Tanenbaum Centre for Pharmacogenetics, Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a movement disorder that may develop in schizophrenia patients being treated long-term with antipsychotic medication. TD interferes with voluntary movements and leads to stigma, and can be associated with treatment non-adherence. The etiology of TD is unclear, but it appears to have a genetic component. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2019.01339DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6901959PMC
November 2019

Psychosocial Implications of Tardive Dyskinesia in Patients With Mood Disorders Versus Schizophrenia.

Authors:
Joseph P McEvoy

J Clin Psychiatry 2019 12 3;80(6). Epub 2019 Dec 3.

Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia, USA.

Dopamine receptor blocking agents-including antipsychotics-can produce tardive dyskinesia (TD). First-generation antipsychotics were effective in treating schizophrenia and severe forms of bipolar disorder; however, they were associated with substantial extrapyramidal effects, especially at high doses. Second-generation antipsychotics are effective and produce fewer adverse movement effects; nevertheless, the risk for TD was not eliminated. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.NU18041BR2CDOI Listing
December 2019

Earlier Diagnosis of Tardive Dyskinesia.

Authors:
Daniel E Kremens

J Clin Psychiatry 2019 Dec 10;81(1). Epub 2019 Dec 10.

Department of Neurology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Because the symptoms of tardive dyskinesia (TD) have an insidious onset and fluctuating nature, and the risk of TD associated with second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) treatment has been underestimated, it has been challenging for clinicians to make an early and accurate TD diagnosis. More patients are at risk of developing this potentially permanent, disabling condition than ever before because of the widespread use of SGAs; therefore, prevention of TD, if possible, is of utmost importance. Clinicians must use reliable screening tools and diagnostic criteria to assess patients for TD, rule out other abnormal movement conditions, and make an accurate TD diagnosis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.NU18041BR1CDOI Listing
December 2019

Cumulative Burden of Illness in Veterans With Tardive Dyskinesia and Serious Mental Disorders.

J Clin Psychopharmacol 2020 Jan/Feb;40(1):38-45

From the Behavioral Health Service, Corporal Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center.

Purpose/background: To inform cost-benefit decisions for veterans, the risk of tardive dyskinesia (TD) and its impact on comorbidities and outcomes were assessed.

Methods/procedures: In a retrospective study, veterans with schizophrenia/schizoaffective, and bipolar and major depressive disorders receiving antipsychotics during the period October 1, 2014, to September 30, 2015, were identified. Tardive dyskinesia was determined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JCP.0000000000001142DOI Listing

[Tardive dyskinesia following discontinuation of neuroleptic therapy in 87-year-old patient].

Soins Gerontol 2019 Nov - Dec;24(140):41-42

Service de gériatrie aiguë polyvalente; UFR Médecine, Paris Sorbonne Université, 91, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France. Electronic address:

In the absence of a therapeutic alternative, the use of neuroleptics in geriatrics should be limited to the bare minimum, given their potentially serious deleterious effects in frail elderly patients. Dyskinesia is one of their most common side effects. Case of an elderly patient in whom the dyskinesia was revealed following abrupt cessation of a neuroleptic taken in the long term with discussions of the etiological hypotheses of this rare situation, which nevertheless deserve to be known. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sger.2019.09.010DOI Listing
December 2019

Valbenazine-induced parkinsonism.

Parkinsonism Relat Disord 2020 01 25;70:13-14. Epub 2019 Nov 25.

Brown University, Department of Neurology, Providence, RI, USA; Butler Hospital, Providence, RI, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2019.11.021DOI Listing
January 2020