160 results match your criteria Supportive Cancer Therapy[Journal]


Vitamin e for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: rationale for an ongoing clinical trial.

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Sep;4(4):251-3

Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN.

Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a troubling side effect that can lead to dose reductions and discontinuation of treatment. This can be quite distressing for patients. Current treatments for CIPN are limited, can have side effects, and are generally of limited efficacy. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S154329121360169
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.023DOI Listing
September 2007
4 Reads

A Phase II/III Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Clinical Trial of Ginger (Zingiber officinale) for Nausea Caused by Chemotherapy for Cancer: A Currently Accruing URCC CCOP Cancer Control Study.

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Sep;4(4):247-50

James P. Wilmot Cancer Center at the University of Rochester, NY.

Despite the widespread use of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist antiemetics such as ondansetron and granistron, up to 70% of patients with cancer receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy agents experience postchemotherapy nausea and vomiting. Delayed postchemotherapy nausea (nausea that occurs >/= 24 hours after chemotherapy administration) and anticipatory nausea (nausea that develops before chemotherapy administration, in anticipation of it) are poorly controlled by currently available antiemetic agents. Scientific studies suggest that ginger (Zingiber officinale) might have beneficial effects on nausea and vomiting associated with motion sickness, surgery, and pregnancy. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S154329121360168
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.022DOI Listing
September 2007
3 Reads

Topiramate in the treatment of neuropathic pain in patients with cancer.

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Sep;4(4):241-6

Division of Hematology-Oncology, New York University Medical Center.

Introduction: Neuropathic pain has been reported to affect 40%-50% of patients with cancer.

Patients And Methods: Consecutive patients selected from the outpatient/adult patient palliative care clinic of the Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the Indiana University Palliative Clinic were reviewed. A verbal pain linear analogue assessment scale was used to assess neuropathic pain. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S154329121360167
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.021DOI Listing
September 2007
6 Reads

Symptom Burden for Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treated with First-Line FOLFOX or FOLFIRI with and Without Bevacizumab in the Community Setting.

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Sep;4(4):233-40

Supportive Oncology Services, Memphis, TN Accelerated Community Oncology Research Network, Memphis, TN West Clinic, Memphis, TN.

Background: FOLFOX (oxaliplatin/leucovorin/5-fluorouracil) and FOLFIRI (irinotecan/leucovorin/5-fluorouracil) with or without bevacizumab have become standard-of-care regimens in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. However, there is a paucity of symptom burden information regarding these regimens from the patient perspective in community oncology.

Patients And Methods: This retrospective chart review and telephone interview study examined patients with first-line metastatic colorectal cancer from 5 community oncology centers treated with FOLFOX or FOLFIRI with and without bevacizumab. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S15432912136016
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.020DOI Listing
September 2007
7 Reads

An extended dosing regimen of epoetin alfa 60,000 units every 2 weeks in anemic patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy.

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Sep;4(4):225-32

Division of Hematology and Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL.

Purpose: This open-label study evaluated the safety and efficacy of epoetin alfa 60,000 U once weekly Initialsly followed by 60,000 U every 2 weeks in anemic patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy.

Patients And Methods: Patients receiving weekly or every- 4-weeks chemotherapy regimens for nonmyeloid malignancy and with hemoglobin (Hb) level Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.019DOI Listing
September 2007
11 Reads

Phase II Evaluation of Desipramine for the Treatment of Hot Flashes.

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Sep;4(4):219-24

Comprehensive Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN.

Purpose: Newer antidepressants with serotonergic effects reduce hot flashes significantly better than placebo. This pilot study was designed to test the efficacy of desipramine, an older antidepressant targeting norepinephrine, in women desiring therapy for hot flashes and to evaluate the toxicity of desipramine.

Patients And Methods: In this nonrandomized trial, eligible women were required to have reported >/= 14 bothersome hot flashes per week for >/= 1 month. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.018DOI Listing
September 2007
8 Reads

Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia in patients receiving capecitabine and intratumor thymidine phosphorylase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase: is there a pharmacologic explanation?

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Sep;4(4):211-8

Yale University, New Haven, CT.

Background: Palmar-plantar erythordysesthesia (PPE) is the most common toxicity of capecitabine. Preclinical studies have shown that radiation therapy (RT) upregulates thymidine phosphorylase (TP), which could in turn increase the efficacy of capecitabine. Capecitabine is degraded by dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), and a deficiency in this enzyme can increase the toxicity of capecitabine. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S154329121360163
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.017DOI Listing
September 2007
11 Reads

Rapid and sustained influence of intravenous zoledronic Acid on course of pain and analgesics consumption in patients with cancer with bone metastases: a multicenter open-label study over 1 year.

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Sep;4(4):203-10

Department of Hematology, Oncology and Tumor Immunology, Robert Roessle Klinik der Charité - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Buch am HELIOS-Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Berlin.

Background: Bone metastases might lead to severe bone pain, pathologic fractures, and hypercalcemia. Osteolytic destruction is caused by the activation of osteoclasts by release of tumor-derived stimulating factors. Bisphosphonates are known to inhibit osteoclast function and, therefore, to alleviate the adverse effects of tumor-induced bone resorption. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.016DOI Listing
September 2007
32 Reads

Sunshine and rash: testing the role of sunscreen to prevent epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor-induced rash.

Authors:
Aminah Jatoi

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Sep;4(4):198-202

Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Most patients who receive epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors develop a rash. To date, no effective palliative therapy has been developed for these rashes. This review describes the rationale behind N05C4, a placebo-controlled trial of sunscreen as an intervention to prevent EGFR inhibitor-related rash. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S154329121360161
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.015DOI Listing
September 2007
5 Reads

The effect of palifermin on chemotherapyand radiation therapy-induced mucositis: a review of the current literature.

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Sep;4(4):188-97

Division of Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC.

Oral mucositis is a painful ulceration of the mucosal lining of the oropharynx. It occurs frequently in patients receiving radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy for solid tumors and has been reported in up to 98% of patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The development of mucositis is associated with significant morbidity, including longer hospital stays, increased bacteremia, and pain that interferes with talking, eating, and sleeping. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.014DOI Listing
September 2007
3 Reads

Urinary N-telopeptide is a rapid predictor of response to and palliative benefit from bisphosphonate therapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Sep;4(4):182-7

Division of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Bone is the most common site of metastases in patients with advanced breast cancer. In these patients, the primary aim of therapy is to prevent and delay the occurrence of skeletal-related events (SREs), which can be defined as follows: (1) pain requiring radiation or surgical intervention, (2) spinal cord compression, (3) pathologic fracture, or (4) hypercalcemia. Unfortunately, determining which patients are at highest risk for an SRE is difficult with current imaging techniques. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.013DOI Listing
September 2007
5 Reads

Hitting our stride.

Authors:
Jeffrey Crawford

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Sep;4(4):178-9

Research in Cancer, Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Clinical Research, Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Durham, NC.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.012DOI Listing
September 2007
7 Reads

Selected clinical trials in supportive cancer therapy.

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Jul;3(4):254

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July 2006
6 Reads

Radiation injury to the rectum and amifostine.

Authors:
Martin Borg

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Jul;3(4):251-3

Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, South Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2006.n.024DOI Listing
July 2006
3 Reads

Adverse effects of bevacizumab and their management in solid tumors.

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Jul;3(4):247-50

University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX.

Bevacizumab is the first successful example of targeting the vasculature for the treatment of solid tumors. Although generally well tolerated in combination with different chemotherapy regimens, bevacizumab has side effects that are unique to this class of agents. In this review, we discuss the side effects associated with bevacizumab and potential treatments to ameliorate these toxicities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2006.n.023DOI Listing
July 2006
7 Reads

Pilot evaluation of aprepitant for the treatment of hot flashes.

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Jul;3(4):240-6

Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN.

Background: Hot flashes are a major cause of morbidity among postmenopausal women, including many survivors of breast cancer. Hormone therapy decreases hot flashes but is not used as much as is has been because of toxicity concerns. Various new centrally acting agents have also been shown to decrease hot flashes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2006.n.022DOI Listing
July 2006
12 Reads

Efficacy of Darbepoetin Alfa in the Treatment of Chemotherapy-Induced Anemia in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Jul;3(4):232-9

Department of Hematology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL.

Background: Patients receiving chemotherapy often experience chemotherapy-induced anemia, which contributes to a significant reduction in their quality of life. This exploratory analysis assessed the efficacy, dosing, and safety of darbepoetin alfa administered every 2 weeks to a subset of patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chemotherapy-induced anemia who were enrolled in 2 large, multicenter, open-label, community-based studies: the Successful Outcomes in Anemia Research (SOAR) trial and the Study to Understand and Reduce Patients' Anemia Symptom Severity (SURPASS).

Patients And Methods: Eligible patients were receiving multicycle chemotherapy and were anemic, with hemoglobin levels Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2006.n.021DOI Listing
July 2006
10 Reads

The Severe Chronic Neutropenia International Registry: 10-Year Follow-up Report.

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Jul;3(4):220-31

Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle.

Background: The Severe Chronic Neutropenia International Registry (SCNIR) was organized 10 years ago to improve understanding and treatment of the group of rare hematologic disorders causing blood neutrophil counts to be < 500/muL for months or years.

Patients And Methods: Patients now enrolled include those with severe congenital neutropenia (n = 526), cyclic neutropenia (n = 205), idiopathic neutropenia (n = 349), autoimmune neutropenia (n = 68), and other (n = 15). More than 90% (1053 of 1163) of patients in the SCNIR have been treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), median dose 3. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2006.n.020DOI Listing
July 2006
15 Reads

Supportive care aspects of vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty in patients with cancer.

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Jul;3(4):214-9

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York.

As cancer survival rates continue to improve, many patients with cancer experience an increased incidence of osteolytic bone destruction that can lead to vertebral collapse. Many people with vertebral compression fractures develop pain and spinal deformity, mainly kyphosis. Kyphosis has been associated with a decrease in physical function, depression, loss of independence, decreased lung capacity, malnutrition because of early satiety, and death. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2006.n.019DOI Listing
July 2006
22 Reads

Role of prophylactic antibiotics in the prevention of infections after chemotherapy: a literature review.

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Jul;3(4):207-16

The Cancer Centre, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Queen Elizabeth Cancer Centre, UK.

Febrile neutropenia is a serious sequel of chemotherapy and can result in significant morbidity and mortality. The use of prophylactic antibiotics during neutropenia to reduce this complication has been widely investigated. Historical trials that tested a variety of approaches were generally small and reported mixed results. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2006.n.018DOI Listing
July 2006
2 Reads

Support for supportive cancer therapy.

Authors:
Jeffrey Crawford

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Jul;3(4):203

Clinical Research, Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Durham, NC.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2006.n.017DOI Listing
July 2006
3 Reads

Selected clinical trials in supportive cancer therapy.

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Apr;3(3):187

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April 2006
4 Reads

Abbreviated rasburicase dosing for the prevention and treatment of hyperuricemia in adults at risk for tumor lysis syndrome.

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Apr;3(3):178-82

H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL.

Background: The purpose of this study is to report the experience of using abbreviated rasburicase dosing for adult patients at risk for developing hyperuricemia secondary to tumor lysis syndrome.

Patients And Methods: All patients who received rasburicase from January 2003 through March 2004 were identified, and a retrospective chart review was conducted.

Results: Thirteen patients received >/= 1 dose of rasburicase for the prevention or treatment of hyperuricemia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2006.n.016DOI Listing
April 2006
4 Reads

Greater physical and psychological symptom burden in patients with grade 3/4 chemotherapy-induced neutropenia.

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Apr;3(3):173-7

Supportive Oncology Services and Accelerated Community Oncology Research Network and the West Clinic, Memphis, TN.

Background: Neutropenia is a common toxicity caused by chemotherapy that can lead to febrile neutropenia, infection, and dose reductions or delays that can diminish the efficacy of treatment. The relationship between chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and symptom burden is less well known. Recent data show a trend toward a greater incidence, duration, and severity of other toxicities of chemotherapy in patients with grade 4 neutropenia. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S154329121360008
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2006.n.015DOI Listing
April 2006
4 Reads

Supportive care in colon cancer.

Authors:
Dorothy M K

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Apr;3(3):171-2

Department of Medical Oncology, RAH Cancer Center, University of Adelaide, South Australia.

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April 2006
2 Reads

Supportive care in the management of colon cancer.

Authors:
Michael A Morse

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Apr;3(3):158-70

Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC.

Patients with colorectal cancer present a number of supportive care challenges including those related to the underlying disease, such as gastrointestinal obstruction, nausea, anorexia, and fatigue, and those caused by the treatments, such as oral mucositis, neuropathy, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Unique toxicities can accompany specific routes of administration of colon cancer drugs such as hand-foot syndrome with oral capecitabine and continuous infusion fluorouracil and biliary sclerosis with intrahepatic arterial floxuridine. The newer targeted therapies also present new toxicities, such as cardiovascular events and wound-healing complications with bevacizumab and rash and hypomagnesemia with cetuximab. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2006.n.014DOI Listing
April 2006
3 Reads

Mucositis management in patients with cancer.

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Apr;3(3):154-7

Department of Medical Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, South Australia.

Mucositis is an important toxicity to be aware of in anticancer therapy. It contributes to a reduction in cure rates from cancer. Until recently, it has been poorly understood and therefore has not been well managed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2006.n.013DOI Listing
April 2006
21 Reads

Role of bisphosphonates for the management of skeletal complications and bone pain from skeletal metastases.

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Apr;3(3):143-53

Hospital de Santa Maria, Faculdade de Medicina de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.

Bone metastases are common in patients with advanced-stage cancer; they can lead to skeletal complications (ie, pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, tumor-induced hypercalcemia, and severe bone pain) that often require orthopedic surgery or palliative radiation therapy and negatively affect quality of life. The primary role of bisphosphonates for the management of bone metastases in patients with advanced-stage cancer is the prevention of these painful skeletal complications. In placebo-controlled trials, a number of bisphosphonates, including oral clodronate, oral and intravenous (I. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S154329121360004
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2006.n.012DOI Listing
April 2006
3 Reads

Novel neurokinin-1 antagonists as antiemetics for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced emesis.

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Apr;3(3):140-2

CIG Media Group, LP, Dallas, TX.

Despite significant advances in supportive care in oncology, many patients with cancer still experience chemotherapy- induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). Historically, there were only 3 neurotransmitter receptors (dopamine D2, cannabinoid- 1, and 5-hydroxytryptamine-3) that were the known targets for antiemetic therapy. Major advances in the management of chemotherapy-induced emesis were seen with the introduction of 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor antagonists, which include palonosetron, ondansetron, tropisetron, dolasetron, and granisetron. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2006.n.011DOI Listing
April 2006
4 Reads

Clinical utility of novel agents in the treatment of central venous catheter occlusion.

Authors:
G Kesava Reddy

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Apr;3(3):135-9

CIG Media Group, LP, Dallas, TX.

Central venous catheter (CVC) occlusion occurs frequently and remains a significant clinical problem in patients with cancer receiving infusional or intravenous chemotherapy. Thrombotic occlusions frequently limit the benefits of potentially curable cytotoxic agents by interrupting the delivery of infusion of chemotherapy, intravenous medication, nutritional support, and blood products, as well as the frequent acquisition of venous blood samples for laboratory testing. Urokinase has been used as a thrombolytic agent for dysfunctional occluded CVCs, but the alterations in manufacturing practice prompted the Food and Drug Administration to suspend further production of urokinase in 1999. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2006.n.010DOI Listing
April 2006
6 Reads

Becoming a supportive cancer therapy generalist.

Authors:
Jeffrey Crawford

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Apr;3(3):134

Medical Oncology, Division of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2006.n.009DOI Listing
April 2006
3 Reads

Selected clinical trials in supportive cancer therapy.

Support Cancer Ther 2007 May;4(3):168

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May 2007
5 Reads

Symptom clusters in patients with advanced-stage cancer referred for palliative radiation therapy in an outpatient setting.

Support Cancer Ther 2007 May;4(3):157-62

Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Toronto Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Canada.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the presence of symptom clusters in patients with advanced cancer.

Patients And Methods: Patients with metastatic cancer referred to an outpatient palliative radiation therapy clinic were asked to rate their symptom distress using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS). Baseline demographic data were obtained. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S154329121360034
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.010DOI Listing
May 2007
4 Reads

Tamoxifen-associated hot flashes in women.

Support Cancer Ther 2007 May;4(3):152-6

Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN.

Purpose: The most prominent toxicity from the antiestrogenic agent tamoxifen is hot flashes. The objective of this project was to better describe the incidence and severity of hot flashes in younger women receiving tamoxifen.

Patients And Methods: This article reports the vasomotor effects associated with the initiation of tamoxifen in 27 women aged < 50 years, most of whom were premenopausal and had received chemotherapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.009DOI Listing
May 2007
7 Reads

Catheter-related thrombosis: a critical review.

Support Cancer Ther 2007 May;4(3):145-51

Medical Oncology Department, La Paz Hospital, Madrid, Spain.

The use of indwelling central venous catheters (CVCs) has improved the management of patients with cancer. However, these devices can be complicated by thrombosis because of their procoagulant state, therapies, immobility, and comorbidities. In addition, an indwelling CVC is a foreign body within the blood stream and can cause a mechanical injury during its insertion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.008DOI Listing
May 2007
3 Reads

May day.

Authors:
Jeffrey Crawford

Support Cancer Ther 2007 May;4(3):135-6

Research in Cancer, Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Clinical Research, Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Durham, NC.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.007DOI Listing
May 2007
2 Reads

Selected clinical trials in supportive cancer therapy.

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Jan;4(2):123

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January 2007
4 Reads

Chocolate as a cough suppressant: rationale and justification for an upcoming clinical trial.

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Jan;4(2):119-22

Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Cough is a troubling symptom for many patients with cancer. Current cough suppressants can cause side effects and, at the same time, might not provide absolute cough palliation. Suprisingly, accumulating evience suggests that dark chocolate can carry antitussive effects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.006DOI Listing
January 2007
3 Reads

Patient expectation of the partial response and response shift in pain score.

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Jan;4(2):110-8

Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Toronto Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Canada.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to define the minimum reduction in pain level that patients would expect and to examine whether response shift exists in the treatment of bone metastases with palliative radiation therapy (RT).

Patients And Methods: Patients with bone metastases were asked to quantify the minimal level of pain reduction by 2 months that they considered would justify the palliative RT based on their current pain (on a scale of 0-10 and a 4-point scale of none, mild, moderate, or severe). At the 2-month follow-up, they were asked the conventional "post-test" question, ie, what is their level of pain now? In addition, they were asked to retrospectively reevaluate their baseline "pretest" level of pain, which is referred to as a "then-test," ie, how would they now rate their level of pain before RT?

Results: Two hundred seventeen patients were enrolled. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.005DOI Listing
January 2007
4 Reads

Balancing risk and benefit for first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: a graphic communication tool for patients and physicians.

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Jan;4(2):101-9

Department of Medical Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London Regional Cancer Program.

Advances in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer have improved overall survival (OS); however, this might come at the cost of increased toxicity. Health-related quality of life, a significant concern closely related to toxicity and important when discussing palliative therapy, is infrequently assessed and reported in older clinical trials. As the number of tested regimens increases, the question arises on how to best present palliative treatment options. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S154329121360026
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.004DOI Listing
January 2007
4 Reads

Treatment of bone metastases and bone pain with bisphosphonates.

Authors:
Allan Lipton

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Jan;4(2):92-100

Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey.

Many solid tumors metastasize to bone, leading to debilitating skeletal complications such as intractable bone pain and pathologic fractures. Patients who experience a skeletal-related event (SRE) are at higher risk for subsequent events. After an SRE such as a pathologic fracture, spinal cord compression, or the requirement for orthopedic surgery or palliative radiation therapy, a patient's quality of life and functional independence could decline substantially. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.003DOI Listing
January 2007
5 Reads

Epoetin alfa treatment for patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia.

Authors:
David H Henry

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Jan;4(2):78-91

Joan Karnell Cancer nell Cancer Center, Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia.

Anemia (hemoglobin [Hb] < 12 g/dL) is a frequent and debilitating complication in the treatment of cancer. The negative effects of anemia include impairment of organ systems, disruption of important aspects of patient quality of life, and potential interference with completion and outcomes of cancer chemotherapy. Guidelines issued by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network and the American Society of Hematology/American Society of Clinical Oncology jointly suggest that anemia in patients with cancer be managed by restoring Hb levels to approximately 12 g/dL, thereby minimizing transfusion requirements and resolving clinical symptoms associated with anemia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.002DOI Listing
January 2007
2 Reads

Cancer management in the era of targeted agents.

Authors:
Jeffrey Crawford

Support Cancer Ther 2007 Jan;4(2):69

Research in Cancer, Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Clinical Research, Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Durham, NC.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2007.n.001DOI Listing
January 2007
2 Reads

Selected clinical trials in supportive cancer therapy.

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Oct;4(1):64

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October 2006
2 Reads

Utility of cancer web sites for a public hospital empoli (florence), Italy oncology population in tuscany, Italy.

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Oct;4(1):63

Istituto Tumori Toscano, Dipartimento Oncologico, Ospedale Generale S. Giuseppe, Empoli (Florence), Italy.

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October 2006
12 Reads

An open-label pilot study to evaluate a flexible dosing regimen of epoetin alfa for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia: 60,000 units weekly followed by 60,000 units every 2 weeks.

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Oct;4(1):56-62

St. Joseph's Mercy Cancer Center, Hot Springs, AR.

Purpose: This open-label, single-arm pilot study assessed the safety and efficacy of administering an Initials epoetin alfa dose of 60,000 U subcutaneously once weekly (Initials dosing phase [IDP]) followed by an extended dose regimen of 60,000 U subcutaneously every 2 weeks (extended dosing phase [EDP]).

Patients And Methods: Patients who had a hematologic response, defined as hemoglobin (Hb) level increase >/= 1 g/dL from week 1 baseline at any time during the 4-week IDP (the primary efficacy endpoint), were eligible to enter the EDP at week 5 and receive every-other-week treatment for up to 12 additional weeks. Patients who did not exhibit this increase in the IDP were withdrawn. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2006.n.032DOI Listing
October 2006
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Effect of treatment with epoetin Beta on thromboembolic events in anemic patients with cancer: a metaanalysis.

Support Cancer Ther 2006 Oct;4(1):49-55

Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Service d'Hematologie, Lyon, France.

Purpose: Epoetin therapy is associated with a slight increase in thromboembolic event (TEE) incidence, although causality is uncertain. This metaanalysis compared TEE incidence in patients with cancer-related anemia treated with epoetin beta versus a control group (placebo or standard treatment) and investigated the impact of hemoglobin (Hb) parameters on thromboembolic risk.

Patients And Methods: Patients from 9 randomized trials were pooled (epoetin beta group, n = 800; control group, n = 613). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3816/SCT.2006.n.031DOI Listing
October 2006
5 Reads