371 results match your criteria Superior Labrum Lesions


Is arthroscopic repair superior to biceps tenotomy and tenodesis for type II SLAP lesions? A meta-analysis of RCTs and observational studies.

J Orthop Surg Res 2019 Feb 13;14(1):48. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Department of Joint and Sport Medicine, Tianjin Union Medical Center, Jieyuan Road 190, Hongqiao District, Tianjin, 300121, People's Republic of China.

Objective: Labral repair and biceps tenotomy and tenodesis are routine operations for type II superior labrum anterior posterior (SLAP) lesion of the shoulder, but evidence of their superiority is lacking. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic repair versus biceps tenotomy and tenodesis intervention.

Methods: The eight studies were acquired from PubMed, Medline, Embase, CNKI, and Cochrane Library. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13018-019-1096-yDOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Effectiveness of biceps tenodesis versus SLAP repair for surgical treatment of isolated SLAP lesions: A systemic review and meta-analysis.

J Orthop Translat 2019 Jan 4;16:23-32. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

Department of Sports Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.

Background: Type II superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions could induce chronic shoulder pain and impaired movement. Current management of Type II SLAP lesions consists of two well-established surgical procedures: arthroscopic biceps tenodesis and SLAP repair. However, which technique is preferred over the other is still a controversy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jot.2018.09.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6350076PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

Current trends in the evaluation and treatment of SLAP lesions: analysis of a survey of specialist shoulder surgeons.

JSES Open Access 2018 Mar 1;2(1):48-53. Epub 2018 Feb 1.

Melbourne Orthopaedic Group, Windsor, VIC, Australia.

Background: Controversies exist in the classification and management of superior labral anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions. Our aims were to assess the concordance rate of a group of specialist shoulder surgeons on the diagnosis of SLAP types and to assess the current trends in treatment preferences for different SLAP types.

Methods: Shoulder surgeons (N = 103) who are members of the Shoulder and Elbow Society of Australia were invited to participate in a multimedia survey on the classification and management of SLAP lesions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jses.2017.12.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6334883PMC
March 2018
1 Read

Arthroscopic Findings and Clinical Outcomes in Patients 40 Years of Age and Older With Recurrent Shoulder Dislocation.

Arthroscopy 2019 Feb 3;35(2):314-322. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Shoulder & Elbow Clinic, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address:

Purpose: The present study investigates the intra-articular findings and clinical outcomes after arthroscopic surgery in patients after age 40 with chronic anterior shoulder instability.

Methods: Fifty patients older than 40 years who underwent arthroscopic stabilization for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation were analyzed.

Results: The mean age at the time of surgery was 44. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07498063183073
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2018.08.041DOI Listing
February 2019
7 Reads

Surgical Management of Comminuted, Displaced Greater Tuberosity Fractures: A New Technique of Subacromial Spacer on Top of Double-Row Suture Anchor Fixation.

Authors:
Leslie Naggar

Joints 2018 Sep 31;6(3):211-214. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Cabinet Médical, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Arthroscopic treatment of greater tuberosity (GT) fractures has been previously described. Arthroscopy allows identifying and addressing coexisting injuries, such as rotator cuff tears, labrum, or superior labrum anterior and posterior lesions, which are often present. Fracture comminution precludes the use of rigid fracture fixation with screws and arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is performed instead. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0038-1675162DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6301850PMC
September 2018
2 Reads

Athletes With Musculoskeletal Injuries Identified at the NFL Scouting Combine and Prediction of Outcomes in the NFL: A Systematic Review.

Orthop J Sports Med 2018 Dec 12;6(12):2325967118813083. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York, USA.

Background: Prior to the annual National Football League (NFL) Draft, the top college football prospects are evaluated by medical personnel from each team at the NFL Scouting Combine. On the basis of these evaluations, each athlete is assigned an orthopaedic grade from the medical staff of each club, which aims to predict the impact of an athlete's injury history on his ability to participate in the NFL.

Purpose: (1) To identify clinical predictors of signs, symptoms, and subsequent professional participation associated with football-related injuries identified at the NFL Combine and (2) to assess the methodological quality of the evidence currently published. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2325967118813083DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6293380PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

Elite Rowers Demonstrate Consistent Patterns of Hip Cartilage Damage Compared With Matched Controls: A T2* Mapping Study.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2018 Nov 27. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

B. Bittersohl, C. Benedikter, A. Franz. T. Hesper, R. Krauspe, C. Zilkens, Department of Orthopedics, University of Düsseldorf, Medical Faculty, Düsseldorf, Germany C. Schleich, G. Antoch, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Düsseldorf, Medical Faculty, Düsseldorf, Germany H. S. Hosalkar, Hosalkar Institute, San Diego, CA, USA; Joint Preservation and Deformity Correction, Paradise Valley Hospital, San Diego, CA, USA; and Hip Preservation, Tricity Medical Center, San Diego, CA, USA One of the authors certifies that he (RK) has received or may receive payments or benefits, during the study period, an amount of less than USD 10,000 from Corin (Cirencester, UK).

Background: Rowing exposes the femoral head and acetabulum to high levels of repetitive abutment motion and axial loading that may put elite athletes at an increased risk for developing early hip osteoarthritis.

Questions/purposes: Do elite rowers demonstrate characteristic hip cartilage lesions on T2 MRI sequences compared with asymptomatic individuals who do not row?

Methods: This study included 20 asymptomatic rowers (mean age, 23 ± 3 years; nine females, 11 males) who had a minimum of 5 years of intensive (≥ 12 hours/week) training. The recruiting of the rowers took place from the central German federal rowing base, which has inherent intense training and selection requirements to declare these athletes as "elite rowers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000576DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Effect of Anterior Anchor on Clinical Outcomes of Type II SLAP Repairs in an Active Population.

Orthopedics 2019 Jan 7;42(1):e32-e38. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

This study evaluated the role of anchor position in persistence of pain and/or revision biceps tenodesis after arthroscopic repair of type II superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions and assessed for patient- and injury-specific variables influencing clinical outcomes. Active-duty service members who underwent arthroscopic repair of type II SLAP lesions between March 1, 2007, and January 23, 2012, were identified. Patients with less than 2-year clinical follow-up; type I, III, and IV SLAP lesions; and primary treatment with biceps tenodesis and/or rotator cuff repair at the time of index surgery were excluded. Read More

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https://www.healio.com/doiresolver?doi=10.3928/01477447-2018
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/01477447-20181102-04DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Effect of Posterior Glenoid Labral Tears at the NFL Combine on Future NFL Performance.

Orthop J Sports Med 2018 Oct 4;6(10):2325967118787464. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, Colorado, USA.

Background: Posterior labral injuries have been recognized as a particularly significant clinical problem in collision and contact athletes.

Purpose: To evaluate the effect that posterior labral tears have on early National Football League (NFL) performance based on position, associated injuries, and operative versus nonoperative management.

Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2325967118787464DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6172941PMC
October 2018
4 Reads

A positive scapular assistance test is equally present in various shoulder disorders but more commonly found among patients with scapular dyskinesis.

Phys Ther Sport 2018 Nov 25;34:129-135. Epub 2018 Sep 25.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tel-Aviv Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel.

Objective: Assess the frequency of a positive scapular assistance test (SAT) in different shoulder disorders and establish its association with scapular dyskinesis.

Design: Cross-sectional.

Setting: Shoulder clinic. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1466853X183038
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ptsp.2018.09.008DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Shoulder Instability: Interobserver and Intraobserver Agreement in the Assessment of Labral Tears.

Orthop J Sports Med 2018 Sep 6;6(9):2325967118793372. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Investigation performed at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA.

Background: The glenohumeral joint combines large range of motion and insufficient bony stabilization, making it susceptible to instability and dislocations. Arthroscopic surgery is routinely used as a diagnostic tool and has been considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of shoulder lesions. However, several studies have demonstrated variability in intraobserver and interobserver agreement. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/2325967118793372
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2325967118793372DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6128077PMC
September 2018
14 Reads

Current Concepts in the Evaluation and Management of Type II Superior Labral Lesions of the Shoulder.

Open Orthop J 2018 31;12:331-341. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

Tulane University School of Medicine, Department of Orthpaedic Surgery, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

Background: Superior labrum tears extending from anterior to posterior (SLAP lesion) are a cause of significant shoulder pain and disability. Management for these lesions is not standardized. There are no clear guidelines for surgical versus non-surgical treatment, and if surgery is pursued there are controversies regarding SLAP repair versus biceps tenotomy/tenodesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1874325001812010331DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6110065PMC
July 2018
3 Reads

MR Imaging of SLAP Lesions.

Open Orthop J 2018 31;12:314-323. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, UC Davis School of Medicine, 4860 Y St., Suite 3800, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA.

Background: SLAP lesions of the shoulder are challenging to diagnose by clinical means alone. Interpretation of MR images requires knowledge of the normal appearance of the labrum, its anatomical variants, and the characteristic patterns of SLAP lesions. In general, high signal extending anterior and posterior to the biceps anchor is the hallmark of SLAP lesions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1874325001812010314DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6110058PMC
July 2018
3 Reads

Superior Labral Anterior to Posterior Tear Management in Athletes.

Open Orthop J 2018 31;12:303-313. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Tx 77030, USA.

Background: The diagnosis and treatment of Superior Labrum Anterior to Posterior (SLAP) tears have been evolving and controversial. The lack of clear diagnostic criteria on physical examination, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and arthroscopic evaluation clouds the issue. The high rate of MRI diagnosed SLAP lesions in the asymptomatic population of athletes and non-athletes warrants consideration when planning treatment for those with shoulder pain. Read More

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https://openorthopaedicsjournal.com/VOLUME/12/PAGE/303/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1874325001812010303DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6110067PMC
July 2018
4 Reads

Treatment of SLAP Lesions.

Open Orthop J 2018 31;12:288-294. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

University of Ioannina, Orthopaedic Department, Ioannina, Greece.

Background: The surgical treatment of a Superior Labrum Anterior and Posterior (SLAP) lesion becomes more and more frequent as the surgical techniques, the implants and the postoperative rehabilitation of the patient are improved and provide in most cases an excellent outcome.

Objective: However, a standard therapy of SLAP lesions in the shoulder surgery has not been established yet. An algorithm on how to treat SLAP lesions according to their type and data on the factors that influence the surgical outcome is essential for the everyday clinical practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1874325001812010288DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6110059PMC
July 2018
3 Reads

Is Anatomical Healing Essential for Better Clinical Outcome in Type II SLAP Repair? Clinico-Radiological Outcome after Type II SLAP Repair.

Clin Orthop Surg 2018 Sep 22;10(3):358-367. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea.

Background: We hypothesized that anatomical healing in superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) repair is associated with good clinical outcome. The purposes of this study were to assess the failure rate of anatomical healing after arthroscopic repair of SLAP lesions using computed tomography arthrography (CTA), investigate correlation of the rate with clinical outcomes, and identify prognostic factors for anatomical failure following SLAP repair.

Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the outcome of 43 patients at a minimum follow-up of 1 year after arthroscopic surgery for SLAP lesions or SLAP lesions associated with Bankart lesions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4055/cios.2018.10.3.358DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6107812PMC
September 2018
8 Reads

Magnetic Resonance Arthrographic Demonstration of Association of Superior Labrum Anterior and Posterior Lesions With Extended Anterior Labral Tears.

J Comput Assist Tomogr 2019 Jan/Feb;43(1):51-60

Department of Orthopedic, Medical Faculty, Ataturk University, Erzurum, Turkey.

Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the full extent of anterior labral tear and associated other labral tears on magnetic resonance arthrographic images in patients with anterior shoulder instability.

Materials And Methods: One hundred ten magnetic resonance arthrography images with anterior labral tear were retrieved from the database of the Radiology Department. Two skeletal radiologists, one with 15 years of experience and the other with 5 years of experience analyzed the images in random order. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/RCT.0000000000000775DOI Listing
January 2019
12 Reads

Technique for Type IV SLAP Lesion Repair.

Arthrosc Tech 2018 Apr 12;7(4):e337-e342. Epub 2018 Mar 12.

Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, Colorado, U.S.A.

Type IV SLAP tears involve bucket-handle tears of the superior labrum with the tears extending into the biceps tendon. Surgical treatment options involve either primary repair or biceps tenodesis. Recent literature has shown good clinical outcomes after subpectoral biceps tenodesis for the treatment of type II and IV SLAP lesions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eats.2017.10.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5981853PMC
April 2018
3 Reads

Outcome of arthroscopic SLAP repair using knot-tying-suture anchors compared with knotless-suture anchors in athletes.

Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 2018 Sep 22;138(9):1273-1285. Epub 2018 May 22.

Department of Sports Orthopedics, Knee- and Shoulder-Surgery, Berufsgenossenschaftliche Unfallklinik Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

Introduction: Arthroscopic repair is one option for the surgical treatment of type II superior labrum tears from anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions in athletes' shoulders.

Materials And Methods: Sixty-one of 78 (78.2%) athletes were retrospectively examined after isolated arthroscopic SLAP repair (group 1/G1: 28x knot-tying anchors; group 2/G2: 33 knotless anchors; follow-up 24 months) and compared to two specific, separate matched volunteer athlete control groups (group 3/G3: 28 athletes matched to G1; group 4/G4: 33 athletes matched to G2). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00402-018-2951-8DOI Listing
September 2018
3 Reads

[Arthroscopic suprapectoral tenodesis of the long head of the biceps tendon].

Authors:
B Finke W Petersen

Oper Orthop Traumatol 2018 Feb 2;30(1):47-63. Epub 2018 Feb 2.

Klinik für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie, Martin-Luther-Krankenhaus Berlin, Berlin, Deutschland.

Objective: The aim of a tenotomy of the long biceps tendon is to remedy a painful pathology in the proximal region of the tendon. Tenodesis of the tendon can restore the motor and cosmetic function of the biceps brachii muscle.

Indications: Partial rupture or tendopathy of the long biceps tendon, injuries of the anchor of the long biceps tendon (SLAP lesions; SLAP: superior labrum anterior posterior), lesions of the pulley system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00064-017-0530-8DOI Listing
February 2018
4 Reads

Arthroscopic Triple Labral Repair in an Adolescent.

Arthrosc Tech 2017 Oct 18;6(5):e1587-e1591. Epub 2017 Sep 18.

OrthoIllinois, Rockford, Illinois, U.S.A.

Traumatic glenohumeral dislocations often result in significant injury to the anterior-inferior labrum, most commonly leading to recurrent anterior instability. While in skeletally immature patients, shoulder trauma more commonly results in fracture versus a true dislocation, shoulder instability does occur and can be difficult to manage in the setting of open physes. In any event, the goal of treatment is to reduce the risk of recurrence and allow full participation in activities, including sports. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eats.2017.06.040DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5710137PMC
October 2017
4 Reads

Neurofilament distribution in the superior labrum and the long head of the biceps tendon.

J Orthop Surg Res 2017 Nov 22;12(1):181. Epub 2017 Nov 22.

AUVA Trauma Center Meidling, Kundratstraße 37, 1120, Vienna, Austria.

Background: The postoperative course after arthroscopic superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) repair using suture anchors is accompanied by a prolonged period of pain, which might be caused by constriction of nerve fibres. The purpose was to histologically investigate the distribution of neurofilament in the superior labrum and the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT), i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13018-017-0686-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5700685PMC
November 2017
5 Reads

The high frequency of superior labrum, biceps tendon, and superior rotator cuff pathologies in patients with subscapularis tears: A cohort study.

J Orthop Sci 2018 Mar 17;23(2):304-309. Epub 2017 Nov 17.

Gazi University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Ankara, Turkey.

Background: The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency of superior labrum anterior posterior (SLAP) lesions, long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) pathologies, and superior rotator cuff tears accompanying subscapularis tears. We hypothesised that LHBT lesions, superior rotator cuff tears, and especially SLAP lesions were very frequent with subscapularis tears.

Methods: The digital files of patients who underwent shoulder arthroscopy were reviewed retrospectively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jos.2017.10.014DOI Listing
March 2018
6 Reads

Arthroscopic Evaluation of Subluxation of the Long Head of the Biceps Tendon and Its Relationship with Subscapularis Tears.

Clin Orthop Surg 2017 Sep 4;9(3):332-339. Epub 2017 Aug 4.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the angle between the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) and the glenoid during arthroscopic surgery and its correlation with biceps subluxation on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Furthermore, we evaluated the relationship of this angle with subscapularis tears and biceps pathologies.

Methods: MRI and arthroscopic images of 270 consecutive patients who had undergone arthroscopic surgery were retrospectively evaluated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4055/cios.2017.9.3.332DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5567029PMC
September 2017
24 Reads

A technique for an arthroscopic proximal biceps tenodesis using a fork anchor.

J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong) 2017 Sep-Dec;25(3):2309499017727944

5 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Lenox Hill Hospital, North Shore-LIJ, New York, NY, USA.

Pathology to the proximal biceps tendon has the potential to be a major source of pain in the shoulder, secondary to complex superior labrum from anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions, partial biceps tears, and subluxations. In order to restore function and improve the patient's quality of life, repair of these injuries is crucial. Tenodesis has long been the ideal treatment of persistent pain caused by pathology of the proximal biceps tendon. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2309499017727944DOI Listing
March 2018
18 Reads

Glenohumeral Instability Related to Special Conditions: SLAP Tears, Pan-labral Tears, and Multidirectional Instability.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2017 Sep;25(3):e12-e17

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at West Point; Keller Army Community Hospital, West Point, NY.

Glenohumeral instability is one of the more common conditions seen by sports medicine physicians, especially in young, active athletes. The associated anatomy of the glenohumeral joint (the shallow nature of the glenoid and the increased motion it allows) make the shoulder more prone to instability events as compared with other joints. Although traumatic dislocations or instability events associated with acute labral tears (ie, Bankart lesions) are well described in the literature, there exists other special shoulder conditions that are also associated with shoulder instability: superior labrum anterior/posterior (SLAP) tears, pan-labral tears, and multidirectional instability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000153DOI Listing
September 2017
29 Reads

Arthroscopic Knot Removal for Failed Superior Labrum Anterior-Posterior Repair Secondary to Knot-Induced Pain.

Am J Sports Med 2017 Sep 11;45(11):2563-2568. Epub 2017 Jul 11.

Shoulder & Elbow Clinic, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Background: Studies on failed superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) repair are increasing. However, the number of reports on treatment options for failed SLAP repair remains quite low, and the clinical results vary between different study groups.

Purpose: To describe the clinical presentation of failed SLAP repair due to knot-induced pain and evaluate the efficacy of arthroscopic knot removal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0363546517713662DOI Listing
September 2017
18 Reads

Arthroscopic Tenodesis of the Long Head of the Biceps Tendon.

JBJS Essent Surg Tech 2017 Sep 12;7(3):e19. Epub 2017 Jul 12.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea.

Lesions of the long head of the biceps brachii tendon (LHBT) are a common source of shoulder pain and dysfunction. Although the exact role of the LHBT in shoulder biomechanics is not clearly understood, pathological involvement of this tendon is a well-known pain generator and frequently the clinical presentation consists of both anterior pain and flexion loss. The initial treatment for lesions of the LHBT should be nonoperative, but if that fails or if the LHBT lesion is combined with rotator cuff lesions or other lesions that need to be repaired surgically, surgical intervention is indicated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.ST.16.00089DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6132708PMC
September 2017
3 Reads

Concomitant SLAP repair does not influence the surgical outcome for arthroscopic Bankart repair of traumatic shoulder dislocations.

J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong) 2017 May-Aug;25(2):2309499017718952

4 Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Lutfiye Nuri Burat State Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Background: Prior studies revealed the presence of superior labrum anterior-to-posterior (SLAP) injury together with Bankart lesions in some patients. The purpose of the study is to compare the clinical results of isolated Bankart repairs with the clinical results of Bankart repairs when performed with concomitant SLAP repairs.

Methods: The patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery for treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability were evaluated retrospectively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2309499017718952DOI Listing
March 2018
30 Reads

Diagnosis and Management of the Biceps-Labral Complex.

Instr Course Lect 2017 Feb;66:65-77

Shoulder and Elbow, Sports Medicine, Hinsdale Orthopaedics, Joliet, Illinois.

The long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) is a common source of pathology. The biceps-labral complex (BLC) is the collective anatomic and clinical features shared by the biceps tendon and the superior labrum. LHBT pathology can be caused by inflammation, instability, or trauma. Read More

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February 2017
39 Reads

Pulley lesions in rotator cuff tears: prevalence, etiology, and concomitant pathologies.

Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 2017 Aug 29;137(8):1097-1105. Epub 2017 May 29.

Department of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, ATOS Clinic Munich, Effnerstraße 38, 81925, Munich, Germany.

Purpose: This study aimed to demonstrate the prevalence of lesions in the biceps pulley complex in a representative, consecutive series of rotator cuff tears and rotator cuff interval treatments. We also analyzed associated tear pattern of rotator cuff injuries and superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions. We evaluated the relationships of these lesions to traumatic genesis and the prevalence of pulley lesions in revision cases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00402-017-2721-zDOI Listing
August 2017
21 Reads

Sham surgery versus labral repair or biceps tenodesis for type II SLAP lesions of the shoulder: a three-armed randomised clinical trial.

Br J Sports Med 2017 Dec 11;51(24):1759-1766. Epub 2017 May 11.

Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Background: Labral repair and biceps tenodesis are routine operations for superior labrum anterior posterior (SLAP) lesion of the shoulder, but evidence of their efficacy is lacking. We evaluated the effect of labral repair, biceps tenodesis and sham surgery on SLAP lesions.

Methods: A double-blind, sham-controlled trial was conducted with 118 surgical candidates (mean age 40 years), with patient history, clinical symptoms and MRI arthrography indicating an isolated type II SLAP lesion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2016-097098DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5754846PMC
December 2017
20 Reads

Clinical Assessment of the Dynamic Labral Shear Test for Superior Labrum Anterior and Posterior Lesions.

Am J Sports Med 2017 Mar 1;45(4):775-781. Epub 2017 Mar 1.

Division of Sports Medicine and Shoulder Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Background: Diagnosing superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions through physical examination remains challenging. The dynamic labral shear test (DLST) has been shown to have likelihood ratios (LRs) of 31.6 and 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0363546517690349DOI Listing
March 2017
4 Reads
3 Citations
4.362 Impact Factor

Management of Proximal Biceps Pathology in Overhead Athletes: What Is the Role of Biceps Tenodesis?

Am J Orthop (Belle Mead NJ) 2017 Jan/Feb;46(1):E71-E78

Jordan-Young Institute for Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, Virginia Beach, VA.

Overhead throwing is a common causative factor in disorders of the proximal biceps in athletes. In recent years, arthroscopic repair of unstable superior labral tears or biceps tendonitis involving the long head of the biceps tendon anchor has become the standard of care. However, in some cases, superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) repair requires additional evaluation and even revision surgery, which contributes to patient dissatisfaction. Read More

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March 2017
9 Reads

The Use of Accessory Portals in Bankart Repair With Posterior Extension in the Lateral Decubitus Position.

Arthrosc Tech 2016 Oct 3;5(5):e1121-e1128. Epub 2016 Oct 3.

Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.

The Bankart lesion, in which the anteroinferior labrum is detached from the glenoid, is the critical anatomic lesion in the majority of patients with anterior glenohumeral instability. Some patients with anterior glenohumeral instability will have Bankart lesions with posterior extension beyond the 6-o'clock position, and achieving anatomic labral repair in these cases can present a technical challenge. In our experience, the lateral decubitus position and use of accessory portals allow superior visualization of the inferior half of the glenohumeral joint for glenoid and labral preparation, anchor placement, and suture management. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S22126287163006
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eats.2016.06.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5310186PMC
October 2016
5 Reads

MR arthrography of the shoulder: evaluation of isotropic 3D intermediate-weighted FSE and hybrid GRE T1-weighted sequences.

Radiol Med 2017 May 15;122(5):353-360. Epub 2017 Feb 15.

Department of Radiology, Sacro Cuore Hospital, Negrar, Italy.

Purpose: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) fast spin echo (FSE) intermediate-weighed (IW-3D) and 3D hybrid double-echo steady-state T1-weighted sequences (Hy-3D) and two-dimensional (FSE) images (2D) at shoulder MR arthrography (MRA).

Materials And Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained and informed consent was waived for this retrospective study. From September 2011 to October 2014, 102 patients who had undergone 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11547-017-0728-8DOI Listing
May 2017
7 Reads

A Prospective Randomized Study Comparing the Interference Screw and Suture Anchor Techniques for Biceps Tenodesis.

Am J Sports Med 2017 Feb 22;45(2):440-448. Epub 2016 Oct 22.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea.

Background: Several methods are used to perform biceps tenodesis in patients with superior labrum-biceps complex (SLBC) lesions accompanied by a rotator cuff tear. However, limited clinical data are available regarding the best technique in terms of clinical and anatomic outcomes.

Purpose: To compare the clinical and anatomic outcomes of the interference screw (IS) and suture anchor (SA) fixation techniques for biceps tenodesis performed along with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0363546516667577DOI Listing
February 2017
10 Reads

Magnetic resonance arthrography results that indicate surgical treatment for partial articular-sided supraspinatus tendon avulsion: a retrospective study in a tertiary center.

Acta Radiol 2017 Sep 18;58(9):1115-1124. Epub 2017 Jan 18.

1 Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Medical Convergence Research Institute, and Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Background Specific findings on magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) that indicate the need for surgery in patients with partial articular-sided supraspinatus tendon avulsion (PASTA) are not well understood. Purpose To determine which MRA findings are characteristic of patients who undergo surgery for PASTA. Material and Methods From July 2011 to February 2014, MRA findings for patients treated for PASTA were retrospectively reviewed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0284185116684673DOI Listing
September 2017
16 Reads

Is clinical evaluation alone sufficient for the diagnosis of a Bankart lesion without the use of magnetic resonance imaging?

Ann Transl Med 2016 Nov;4(21):419

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore 169865, Singapore.

Background: Imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA) offer great utility in diagnosing Bankart lesions but they are associated with a high degree of intra and interobserver variability. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of clinical evaluation and imaging modalities in Bankart lesions such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRA of the shoulder.

Methods: Between February 2004 to January 2015, a retrospectively review of the surgical records at a tertiary hospital identified a total of 250 patients treated with a shoulder arthroscopy for Bankart repair. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/atm.2016.11.22DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5124608PMC
November 2016
10 Reads

Patient-specific chondrolabral contact mechanics in patients with acetabular dysplasia following treatment with peri-acetabular osteotomy.

Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2017 05 3;25(5):676-684. Epub 2016 Dec 3.

Department of Orthopaedics, University of Utah, 590 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA; Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, James LeVoy Sorenson Molecular Biotechnology Building, 36 S. Wasatch Drive, Rm. 3100, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA; Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, 72 S Central Campus Drive, Room 3750, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA; Department of Physical Therapy, University of Utah, 520 Wakara Way, Suite 240, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA. Electronic address:

Objective: Using a validated, patient-specific finite element (FE) modeling protocol, we evaluated cartilage and labrum (i.e., chondrolabral) mechanics before and after peri-acetabular osteotomy (PAO) to provide insight into the ability of this procedure to improve mechanics in dysplastic hips. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2016.11.016DOI Listing
May 2017
8 Reads

Reliability of magnetic resonance imaging versus arthroscopy for the diagnosis and classification of superior glenoid labrum anterior to posterior lesions.

Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 2017 Feb 30;137(2):241-247. Epub 2016 Nov 30.

Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Bezmialem Vakif University, Vatan Cd, Fatih, 34093, Istanbul, Turkey.

Purpose: The physical examination of the shoulder is usually not reliable for the true diagnosis of superior glenoid labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been routinely used for the diagnosis. This prospective study investigates the radiological diagnosis of the SLAP lesions and compares accuracy of arthroscopic and MRI classifications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00402-016-2605-7DOI Listing
February 2017
12 Reads

A systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic test of MRA versus MRI for detection superior labrum anterior to posterior lesions type II-VII.

Skeletal Radiol 2017 Feb 8;46(2):149-160. Epub 2016 Nov 8.

Section for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand.

Objective: To determine the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in superior labrum anterior to posterior lesions (type II-VII) of the shoulder.

Material And Methods: PubMed and Scopus search engines, an electronic search of articles was performed from inception to February 19, 2016. Diagnostic performance of index tests was compared by the summary area under receiver operator characteristic curve (AUROC). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00256-016-2525-1DOI Listing
February 2017
2 Reads

Shoulder and Elbow Injuries in the Adolescent Athlete.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2016 Dec;24(4):188-194

Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH.

With the recent increase in youth sports participation and single-sport youth athletes over the past 30 years, there has been an increase in the number of acute and overuse sports injuries in this population. This review focuses on overuse and traumatic injuries of the shoulder and elbow in young athletes. In particular we discuss little league shoulder, glenohumeral internal rotation deficit, glenohumeral instability, superior labrum anterior posterior lesions, Little League elbow, Panner disease, osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum, posteromedial elbow impingement, and posterolateral rotatory instability of the elbow. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000131DOI Listing
December 2016
11 Reads

Superior Labral Anterior-Posterior (SLAP) Tears in the Military.

Sports Health 2016 Nov/Dec;8(6):503-506. Epub 2016 Oct 8.

Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, Colorado.

Context: Given the notable physical demands placed on active members of the military, comprehension of recent trends in management and outcomes of superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) tears in this patient population is critical for successful treatment.

Evidence Acquisition: Electronic databases, including PubMed, MEDLINE, and Embase, were reviewed for the years 1985 through 2016.

Study Design: Database review. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1941738116671693DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5089360PMC
August 2017
7 Reads

Imaging the Glenoid Labrum and Labral Tears.

Radiographics 2016 Oct;36(6):1628-1647

From the Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium (T.D.C.); Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego Medical Center, 200 W Arbor Dr, San Diego, CA 92103 (S.S.N., C.B.C.); Department of Radiology, Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá, Bogotá, Colombia (M.T.); and Radiology Service, VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, Calif (C.B.C.).

The shoulder joint is the most unstable articulation in the entire human body. While this certainly introduces vulnerability to injury, it also confers the advantage of broad range of motion. There are many elements that work in combination to offset the inherent instability of the glenohumeral joint, but the glenoid labrum is perhaps related most often. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/rg.2016160020DOI Listing
October 2016
15 Reads

Simplified Knotless Mattress Repair of Type II SLAP Lesions.

Arthrosc Tech 2015 Dec 30;4(6):e763-7. Epub 2015 Nov 30.

Brighton & Sussex University Hospital NHS Trust, Brighton, England.

Arthroscopic repair of lesions of the superior labrum and biceps anchor has been shown to provide good to excellent results. We describe a simplified arthroscopic surgical technique using a single knotless anchor with a mattress suture configuration. This technique provides an effective and reproducible method to reattach and re-create the normal appearance of the superior labrum and biceps anchor in a time-efficient manner without the need for knot tying. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eats.2015.07.024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4886353PMC
December 2015
4 Reads

Anterior Shoulder Instability with Concomitant Superior Labrum from Anterior to Posterior (SLAP) Lesion Compared to Anterior Instability without SLAP Lesion.

Clin Orthop Surg 2016 Jun 10;8(2):168-74. Epub 2016 May 10.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea.

Background: The aims of this study were to investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with combined anterior instability and superior labrum from anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions, and to analyze the effect of concomitant SLAP repair on surgical outcomes.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent arthroscopic stabilization for anterior shoulder instability between January 2004 and March 2013. A total of 120 patients were available for at least 1-year follow-up. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4055/cios.2016.8.2.168DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4870320PMC
June 2016
5 Reads

The Snyder Classification of Superior Labrum Anterior and Posterior (SLAP) Lesions.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2016 Sep 13;474(9):2075-8. Epub 2016 Apr 13.

Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, University of Washington, 325 9th Avenue, Box 359798, Seattle, WA, 98104, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11999-016-4826-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4965366PMC
September 2016
3 Reads

Comparison of Treatments for Superior Labrum-Biceps Complex Lesions With Concomitant Rotator Cuff Repair: A Prospective, Randomized, Comparative Analysis of Debridement, Biceps Tenotomy, and Biceps Tenodesis.

Arthroscopy 2016 06 23;32(6):958-67. Epub 2016 Feb 23.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Chungmu Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Purpose: To compare the clinical outcomes in patients with concomitant superior labrum-biceps complex (SLBC) lesions and rotator cuff tears who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, according to 3 different treatment methods (simple debridement, biceps tenotomy, or biceps tenodesis) for the SLBC lesions.

Methods: One hundred twenty patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with SLBC lesions (biceps partial tears <50%, partial pulley lesions, and type II SLAP lesions) were enrolled in this prospective comparative study and randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups (simple debridement [Deb], biceps tenotomy only [BTo], or biceps tenodesis with one suture anchor [BTd]). Patients with isolated subscapularis tears or osteoarthritis were excluded. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2015.11.036DOI Listing
June 2016
8 Reads