540 results match your criteria Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Review [Journal]


The Effects of Endurance Sports on Children and Youth.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2019 Mar;27(1):35-39

Cleveland Clinic Department of Orthopaedics, Cleveland, OH.

In the United States, youth participation in sports continues to increase yearly. This increase in participation, in conjunction with the trend toward early sports specialization and year round training, has led to a similar increase in athletically developed injuries. These injuries vary in nature and acuity, with the type of injury often related to the athlete's age, sport, and level of training. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000230DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Depression in Ultra-endurance Athletes, A Review and Recommendations.

Authors:
John Onate

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2019 Mar;27(1):31-34

Department of Psychiatry, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA.

Depression affects 6.7% of the adult population each year and studies indicate the annual prevalence is similar or even higher in athletes. It is often insidious and not recognized. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000233DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Common and Uncommon Injuries in Ultra-endurance Sports.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2019 Mar;27(1):25-30

North Carolina Orthopaedic Clinic, Duke University Health System, Durham, NC.

Ultra-endurance sports are associated with prolonged physical exercise both during training and competition. Musculoskeletal injuries are common as a result of the repetitive physical stresses. Stress fractures in the weight-bearing bones should always be suspected when ultra-endurance athletes present with pain over bony structures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000217DOI Listing
March 2019
9 Reads

Cardiac Risk of Extreme Exercise.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2019 Mar;27(1):e1-e7

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Sports Cardiology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.

Habitual moderate intensity exercise is a vital component of a healthy lifestyle. For most of the population, increasing exercise duration and intensity beyond current recommendations appears to impart additional cardiovascular benefits; however, recent data has raised the possibility of an inflection point after which additional exercise no longer imparts benefit and may even result in negative cardiovascular outcomes. Exercise at the extremes of human endurance places a large hemodynamic stress on the heart and results in occasionally profound cardiac remodeling in order to accommodate the huge increases in cardiac output demanded by such endeavors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000215DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Fueling and Recovery.

Authors:
Katherine Patton

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2019 Mar;27(1):22-24

Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.

As ultra-endurance races continue to rise in popularity, it is critical that athletes understand how to nourish their bodies with proper amounts of calories from carbohydrate, protein, and fat. The importance of carbohydrate for fueling endurance exercise and protein for recovery is well established; however, the role of fat is debated. Specific amounts of carbohydrate per kilogram of body weight are recommended for before, during, and after ultra-endurance exercise. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000213DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

The Physiology and Biomechanics of the Master Runner.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2019 Mar;27(1):15-21

Exercise, Sports and Movement Sciences, School of Health Studies, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN.

The Master runner (age 35 y and above) represents a unique athletic patient. Lifelong participation in endurance running slows the inevitable age-related decline in aerobic function and muscular strength. Still, the Master runner does not escape the inevitable effects of aging. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000212DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Proper Hydration During Ultra-endurance Activities.

Authors:
Martin D Hoffman

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2019 Mar;27(1):8-14

Department of Veterans Affairs, Northern California Health Care System, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service.

The health and performance of ultra-endurance athletes is dependent on avoidance of performance limiting hypohydration while also avoiding the potentially fatal consequences of exercise-associated hyponatremia due to overhydration. In this work, key factors related to maintaining proper hydration during ultra-endurance activities are discussed. In general, proper hydration need not be complicated and has been well demonstrated to be achieved by simply drinking to thirst and consuming a typical race diet during ultra-endurance events without need for supplemental sodium. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000229DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Participation Trends of Ultra Endurance Events.

Authors:
Volker Scheer

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2019 Mar;27(1):3-7

Institute of Sports Medicine, University of Paderborn and Ultra Sports Science Foundation, Germany.

Ultra endurance events are defined as sporting activities lasting >6 hours and include events such as ultramarathon foot races, ultra triathlons, ultra distance swimming, ultra cycling, and cross-country skiing. Popularity in these events has risen especially over the last 25 years with increasing participation notably in ultramarathon races where an exponential increase in participation has been observed. This is in large part due to the increasing popularity and participation of women and master athletes in these events. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000198DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

The Mystical Experience-An Editorial.

Authors:
Jack T Andrish

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2019 Mar;27(1):1-2

Department for Orthopaedic Surgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000210DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Surgery in Tendinopathies.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Dec;26(4):200-202

Department of Musculoskeletal Disorders, School of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy.

Tendinopathies are challenging. The term "tendinopathy" refers to clinical condition characterized by pain, swelling, and functional limitations of tendons and nearby structures. Tendinopathies give rise to significant morbidity, and, at present, only limited scientifically proven management modalities exist. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000214DOI Listing
December 2018
13 Reads

The Surgical Applications of Biologics in Sports Medicine.

Authors:
F Alan Barber

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Dec;26(4):196-199

Plano Orthopedic Sports Medicine Center, Plano, TX.

Over the past 25 years an increased appreciation of the positive impact of biologic interventions has driven significant advances in the surgical treatment of shoulder and knee conditions. These biologic adjuncts to treatment promote improved outcomes and have set the stage and increased research and development in this arena. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000219DOI Listing
December 2018
8 Reads

Ankle Arthroscopic Surgery.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Dec;26(4):190-195

Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI.

Ankle arthroscopy is a diagnostic and therapeutic surgical procedure which was first attempted on cadavers by Dr Burman in 1931 and first successfully described in patients by Dr Takagi in 1939. Two general approaches to ankle arthroscopy currently exist: (1) anterior ankle arthroscopy and (2) posterior ankle arthroscopy. The indications for ankle arthroscopy have expanded as increased experience has been obtained treating various pathologic entities and as the surgical results have been reported in the literature. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000222DOI Listing
December 2018
11 Reads

Hip Arthroscopy - State of the Art in 2018.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Dec;26(4):185-189

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Surgery, Stanford University, Redwood City, CA.

The field of hip arthroscopy has undergone considerable change in the past 25 years and continues to evolve at a rapid pace. Lessons from the early complications and challenges of hip arthroscopy have led to improved safety and refinement of instrumentation and techniques. The pathophysiology of hip injuries is better understood, and advances in surgical technique have helped expand indications, particularly as a shift from pathology resection to anatomic repair and reconstructive procedures has occurred. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000223DOI Listing
December 2018
9 Reads

Elbow Surgery in Athletes.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Dec;26(4):181-184

Andrews Sports Medicine, Birmingham, AL.

Injuries and disorders of the elbow in athletes are common especially among throwing athletes. Common injuries encountered in the throwing athlete include ulnar collateral ligament injuries, ulnar neuritis, capitellar osteochondritis dissecans, valgus extension overload with posterior olecranon impingement, olecranon stress fracture, and loose bodies. A thorough knowledge of both the functional anatomy as well as throwing biomechanics are required to properly diagnosis and treat these problems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000227DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Surgical Management of Proximal Long Head Biceps Tendon Disorders.

Authors:
Richard L Angelo

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Dec;26(4):176-180

ProOrtho Clinic, Kirkland, Washington.

Disorders of the long head of the biceps tendon can make a significant contribution to shoulder pain and dysfunction. Historically, open biceps tenotomy or a proximal tenodesis of the tendon through a deltopectoral approach was used to manage biceps tendonitis and instability. Recent developments have added additional options. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000197DOI Listing
December 2018
7 Reads

Rotator Cuff Repair: Single Row Repair Versus Double Row Repair and Superior Capsular Reconstruction.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Dec;26(4):171-175

The San Antonio Orthopaedic Group, Burkhart Research Institute for Orthopaedics (BRIO), San Antonio, TX.

The surgical management of rotator cuff (RC) tears has progressed considerably in recent decades. Arthroscopic procedures now represent the mainstay of contemporary treatment approaches. The success of repair is predicated upon the achievement of a secure, durable repair that promotes tendon-to-bone healing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000228DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Shoulder Instability: Anterior, Posterior, Multidirectional, Arthroscopic Versus Open, Bone Block Procedures.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Dec;26(4):168-170

UConn Health, Farmington, CT.

This article presents a retrospective comprehensive review of the history of anterior, posterior, and multidirectional shoulder instability and also reviews key concepts such as open versus arthroscopic repair and glenoid and humeral head bone loss and associated treatments. The future of shoulder instability will continue to evolve as research and clinical experience will determine the direction of the future. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000211DOI Listing
December 2018
11 Reads

Preservation of Knee Articular Cartilage.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Dec;26(4):e23-e30

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL.

Hyaline articular cartilage is critical for the normal functioning of the knee joint. Untreated focal cartilage defects have the potential to rapidly progress to diffuse osteoarthritis. Over the last several decades, a variety of interventions aiming at preserving articular cartilage and preventing osteoarthritis have been investigated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000226DOI Listing
December 2018
12 Reads

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

Authors:
John C Richmond

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Dec;26(4):165-167

Tufts University School of Medicine, New England Baptist Hospital, Outpatient Care Center, Dedham, MA.

The past 3+ decades have been a period of intense interest in the anterior cruciate ligament. Graft choices, techniques, and fixation devices have all evolved. Our understanding of the anatomy has improved. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000218DOI Listing
December 2018
10 Reads

Meniscus Repair and Replacement.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Dec;26(4):160-164

Department of Orthopedics, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY.

The importance of preserving the function of the meniscus is seen with renewed interest. There has been an evolution of arthroscopic meniscus repair from inside-out, outside-in, meniscal fixators, to all-inside suturing techniques. Tear patterns once ignored or thought to be irreparable, such as root tears and horizontal cleavage tears, have recently been undergoing repair with promising results. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000224DOI Listing
December 2018
11 Reads

The Evolution of Patellofemoral Instability Surgery During the Past 25 Years.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Dec;26(4):157-159

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD.

Surgical treatment of patellofemoral instability has evolved during the past 25 years as we developed a better appreciation of anatomy and a more sophisticated understanding of pathophysiology. Currently, most patellofemoral surgeons use soft tissue procedures like medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction to treat medial soft tissue insufficiency and tibial tuberosity or femoral osteotomy to correct substantial bony malalignment. Advances in imaging technology and computational analysis have allowed for more precise preoperative planning and outcome modeling so that the optimum operation using ≥1 of these procedures can be designed to meet the unique needs of an individual patient. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000221DOI Listing
December 2018
11 Reads

Treatment of ACL Tears in the Skeletally Immature Patient.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Dec;26(4):153-156

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Connecticut.

The understanding and treatment of anterior cruciate ligament tears in skeletally immature patients continues to evolve. While conservative management was a mainstay of treatment, poor outcomes have led to several surgical techniques aimed at stabilizing the knee, optimizing outcome, and minimizing the chance of growth disturbance. Current techniques have, in large part, accomplished these goals but challenges remain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000216DOI Listing
December 2018
17 Reads

Knee Dislocation and Multiple Ligament Injuries of the Knee.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Dec;26(4):150-152

GHS Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Danville, PA.

The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the progress in treatment of knee dislocations and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)-based multiple ligament knee injuries over the past 25 years. The perspectives of where we were 25 years ago, where we are today, and where we will be in the future will be explored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000220DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Allograft Use in Shoulder Surgery: Instability and Rotator Cuff.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Sep;26(3):145-148

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY.

Shoulder instability and rotator cuff pathology can provide a challenging problem, especially in the revision setting. Allograft use in primary or revision surgical intervention for shoulder instability and rotator cuff tear may be a valuable resource. This paper reviews allograft tissue use in shoulder surgery for instability and rotator cuff tear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000208DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Long Head of Biceps Injury: Treatment Options and Decision Making.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Sep;26(3):139-144

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY.

The long head of the biceps brachii is a well-known "pain generator" in the shoulder. Biceps tendinitis, instability, and rupture encompass the majority of symptomatic lesions. Clinical diagnosis, particularly of biceps tendinitis, can be difficult, given the nonspecific physical examination findings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000206DOI Listing
September 2018
9 Reads

Options for Failed Rotator Cuff Repair.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Sep;26(3):134-138

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Division of Sports Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY.

Failed rotator cuff repairs can pose a clinical challenge to the treating orthopedic surgeon. There are many nonsurgical and surgical options available to address the failed rotator cuff repair. Surgical options include revising the primary repair, partial or nonanatomic repair, tendon transfer, biological augmentation or use of tissue-engineered grafts for reconstruction, or total joint arthroplasty (typically with a modern reverse total shoulder arthroplasty system). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000205DOI Listing
September 2018
5 Reads

Rotator Cuff Disease: Treatment Options and Considerations.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Sep;26(3):129-133

UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA.

Rotator cuff disease encompasses a broad spectrum of injury and pathology with an increasing incidence with age. Pain with overhead activity, localizing to the deltoid region, and loss of active range of motion of the shoulder are among the most common presenting symptoms. Treatment options are dependent on the extent of disease and patient symptoms, and may range from physical therapy to surgical repair using a variety of possible techniques. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000207DOI Listing
September 2018
6 Reads

Treatment of Articular Cartilage Injuries in the Glenohumeral Joint.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Sep;26(3):120-128

CU Sports Medicine and Performance Center Champions Center, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO.

Articular cartilage injuries in the glenohumeral joint present a unique and difficult problem for the patient and surgeon alike. Various etiologies exist for the development of these cartilage lesions; therefore, treatment options are vast and must be chosen thoughtfully, especially in the young, active patient. Across all treatment modalities, the goal is for the patient to regain lasting function and mobility while decreasing pain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000201DOI Listing
September 2018
4 Reads

Multidirectional Instability of the Shoulder: Treatment Options and Considerations.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Sep;26(3):113-119

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.

Multidirectional instability (MDI) is a debilitating condition that involves chronic subluxation or dislocation of the shoulder in >1 direction. Numerous proposed mechanisms of MDI exist, which occurs in the setting of redundant capsular tissue. Symptoms can range from recurrent dislocations or subluxations to vague aching pain that disrupts activities of daily living. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000199DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Traumatic Instability: Treatment Options and Considerations for Recurrent Posttraumatic Instability.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Sep;26(3):102-112

American Sports Medicine Institute, Andrews Sports Medicine & Orthopaedic Center, Birmingham, AL.

Recurrent traumatic glenohumeral instability is a complex problem with multiple variables to consider, but patient demographics, activities, as well as clinical and radiographic findings provide significant information to help choose the best treatment option. Although nonoperative treatment is a viable option for primary glenohumeral instability and in-season instability, recurrent instability exhibits anatomic factors which render nonsurgical treatment limited in scope. A proper patient history, clinical examination, and standard and advanced imaging are necessary in the assessment of patients with recurrent traumatic instability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000204DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Traumatic Anterior Instability: Treatment Options for Initial Instability.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Sep;26(3):95-101

American Sports Medicine Institute, Birmingham, AL.

Because of the lack of bony restraints and minimal articular contact, the glenohumeral joint can attain significant range of motion; however, this results in the propensity for instability. The most generic form of instability, traumatic anterior instability, reliably produces a series of pathoanatomic findings. While reliable, these findings contribute to the complexities of caring for patients after an initial instability event. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000203DOI Listing
September 2018
14 Reads

Anatomy and Physical Examination of the Shoulder.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Sep;26(3):e10-e22

Department of Orthopaedics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY.

The shoulder is a complex joint, with a wide range of motion and functional demands. An understanding of the intricate network of bony, ligamentous, muscular, and neurovascular anatomy is required in order to properly identify and diagnose shoulder pathology. There exist many articulations, unique structural features, and anatomic relationships that play a role in shoulder function, and therefore, dysfunction and injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000202DOI Listing
September 2018
5 Reads

The Overhead Athletes Shoulder.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Sep;26(3):88-94

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

The overhead athlete places tremendous forces across the shoulder which result in necessary adaptive, but also potentially pathologic structural change. In this chapter we aim to review the biomechanics of throwing, the mechanisms of injury with overhead sports, the detailed history, and physical examination in this population, and concluding with specific diagnoses and the various treatment options. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000200DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Complex Issues in Shoulder Surgery: Instability and Rotator Cuff.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 09;26(3):87

Division of Sports Medicine, URMC Surgery Center, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000209DOI Listing
September 2018
7 Reads

Complications of Tibial Tuberosity Osteotomy: Erratum.

Authors:

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 06;26(2):86

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000196DOI Listing
June 2018
1 Read

Alternatives to Biologics in Management of Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Jun;26(2):79-85

University of Salerno School of Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry, Salerno, Italy.

Background: Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is a common condition encountered by physicians. KOA is addressed by a wide array of modalities including a number of nonbiological treatments.

Methods: PubMed, ISI Web of Science, and SPORTDiscus were searched for level 1 to 4 studies published from inception to August 2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000190DOI Listing
June 2018
6 Reads

ACL Allograft: Advantages and When to Use.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Jun;26(2):75-78

Orthopedic Clinic Association, Phoenix, AZ.

It is commonly recommended to reconstruct a torn anterior cruciate ligament in active patients; however, there is no consensus concerning the tissue source to use for the reconstruction. Bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring (semitendinosis +/- gracilis) autografts are most commonly used, with allografts being another option. Each tissue has its pros and cons, with allografts often cited as having higher failure rates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000194DOI Listing
June 2018
1 Read

Amniotic Epithelial Stem Cells: Salient Features and Possible Therapeutic Role.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Jun;26(2):70-74

Department of Musculoskeletal Disorders, University of Salerno School of Medicine and Dentistry, Salerno, Italy.

This is a study of amniotic epithelial cells, which form the innermost layer of the amniotic membrane. These cells can be easily isolated and display peculiar and unique properties, such as plasticity and differentiation potential toward the 3 germinal layers, that may aid regeneration and/or repair of damaged or diseased tissues and organs. A robust literature based on in vitro, experimental, and clinical studies in large animals demonstrates that these cells can enhance the regeneration of tendons, bone, and articular cartilage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000189DOI Listing
June 2018
4 Reads

Microcapsule Technology for Controlled Growth Factor Release in Musculoskeletal Tissue Engineering.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Jun;26(2):e2-e9

Department of Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry, University of Salerno, Baronissi (SA), Italy.

Tissue engineering strategies have relied on engineered 3-dimensional (3D) scaffolds to provide architectural templates that can mimic the native cell environment. Among the several technologies proposed for the fabrication of 3D scaffold, that can be attractive for stem cell cultivation and differentiation, moulding or bioplotting of hydrogels allow the stratification of layers loaded with cells and with specific additives to obtain a predefined microstructural organization. Particularly with bioplotting technology, living cells, named bio-ink, and additives, such as biopolymer microdevices/nanodevices for the controlled delivery of growth factors or biosignals, can be organized spatially into a predesigned 3D pattern by automated fabrication with computer-aided digital files. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000188DOI Listing
June 2018
1 Read

Making Them Commit: Strategies to Influence Phenotypic Differentiation in Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Jun;26(2):64-69

Department of Musculoskeletal Disorders, School of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy.

Tendon injuries, bone defects, and cartilage defects are complex clinical conditions leading to pain and dysfunctions. Tendon, bone, and cartilage are highly specialized and organized tissues, and the self-healing may be limited by their histologic features, or impaired by the local conditions. Furthermore, the resultant tissue often shows inferior properties compared with native tissue, leading to high rates of reruptures and revision surgeries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000187DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

Platelet-rich Plasma and Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Exciting, But … are we there Yet?

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Jun;26(2):59-63

Department of Musculoskeletal Disorders, University of Salerno School of Medicine and Dentristry, Salerno, Italy.

Joint conditions incapacitate free movement driving to a sedentary lifestyle, a major risk factor for chronic diseases. Regenerative procedures, involving the use of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells along with platelet-rich plasma (PRP), can help patients with these conditions. We describe the main characteristics of cellular products (bone marrow concentrate, stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue, and mesenchymal stem/stromal cells derived from these tissues), and the potential benefits of combination with PRP in 3 scenarios: PRP lysates used during laboratory cell expansion; PRP to prime cellular products or the host tissue before cell implantation; PRP used as a vehicle for cell transplantation and to provide trophic signals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000191DOI Listing
June 2018
4 Reads

Cell Therapies in Tendon, Ligament, and Musculoskeletal System Repair.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Jun;26(2):48-58

Department of Musculoskeletal Disorders, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy.

In the last few decades, several techniques have been used to optimize tendon, ligament, and musculoskeletal healing. The evidence in favor of these techniques is still not proven, and level I studies are lacking. We performed an analysis of the therapeutic strategies and tissue engineering projects recently published in this field. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000192DOI Listing
June 2018
3 Reads

PRP as an Adjunct to Rotator Cuff Tendon Repair.

Authors:
F Alan Barber

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Jun;26(2):42-47

Plano Orthopedic Sports Medicine and Spine Center, Plano, TX.

Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a commonly performed repair. Technical developments provide surgeons the tools to create biomechanically robust repairs. How can the biological response mirror the strong and stable surgery? Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a supraphysiological platelet concentration which may positively augment rotator cuff healing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000193DOI Listing
June 2018
9 Reads

Biological Therapies in Orthopedic Sports Medicine.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 06;26(2):41

Plano Orthopedic Sports Medicine Center, Plano, TX.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000186DOI Listing
June 2018
1 Read

Articular Cartilage: Injury Pathways and Treatment Options.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Mar;26(1):31-39

Orthopaedic Research Institute and the Southern California Center for Sports Medicine, Long Beach, CA.

Articular cartilage injury and degeneration is a frequent occurrence in synovial joints. Treatment of these articular cartilage lesions are a challenge because this tissue is incapable of quality repair and/or regeneration to its native state. Nonoperative treatments endeavor to control symptoms, and include anti-inflammatory medication, viscosupplementation, bracing, orthotics, and activity modification. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000182DOI Listing
March 2018
3 Reads

Achilles Tendinopathy.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Mar;26(1):16-30

Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Mile End Hospital, London, England.

Achilles tendinopathy is a common cause of disability. Despite the economic and social relevance of the problem, the causes and mechanisms of Achilles tendinopathy remain unclear. Tendon vascularity, gastrocnemius-soleus dysfunction, age, sex, body weight and height, pes cavus, and lateral ankle instability are considered common intrinsic factors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000185DOI Listing
March 2018
11 Reads

Osteotomies in Patello-Femoral Instabilities.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 Mar;26(1):8-15

2 rue de l'Hôpital, 2000 Neuchâtel, Switzerland.

Patellar instability is defined by clinical and radiologic criteria. The surgical treatment is aimed at restoring the congruence of the patellofemoral articulation and correcting extensor mechanism malalignment, to prevent recurrence of dislocation. The standard soft-tissue procedures are lateral release and vastus medialis advancement and medial patello femoral ligament plasty. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000183DOI Listing
March 2018
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Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Review (Issue 1 Editorial).

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 03;26(1):e1

Department of Orthopaedics, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, New York.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000175DOI Listing
March 2018
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Historical Perspectives: Twenty-five Years in Review.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2018 03;26(1)

Greenville Health System, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, San Francisco.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000174DOI Listing
March 2018
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Ankle MRI and Arthroscopy Correlation With Cartilaginous Defects and Symptomatic Os Trigonum.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2017 Dec;25(4):237-245

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.

Arthroscopic intervention of the foot and ankle is used for a growing number of procedures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be a helpful technique while detecting pathology before surgical intervention. A common use of MRI is detecting osteochondral lesion of the talus; however, other pathology can be detected including but not limited to symptomatic Os trigonum and subtalar osteochondral defects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000169DOI Listing
December 2017
4 Reads