4,107 results match your criteria Sports Medicine[Journal]


Correction to: Effects of Carbohydrate Mouth Rinse on Cycling Time Trial Performance: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Sports Med 2019 Feb 22. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Exercise Psychophysiology Research Group, School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, University of São Paulo, 1000 Arlindo Béttio Avenue, Ermelino Matarazzo, São Paulo, SP, 03828-000, Brazil.

Section 3.2, Fig. 2: The wording on the x-axis which previously read. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01079-9DOI Listing
February 2019

Correction to: Principles of Motor Learning to Support Neuroplasticity After ACL Injury: Implications for Optimizing Performance and Reducing Risk of Second ACL Injury.

Sports Med 2019 Feb 21. Epub 2019 Feb 21.

Exercise Science & Neuroscience Unit, Department Exercise and Health, Faculty of Science, Paderborn University, Paderborn, Germany.

"As ACL injury may alter intracortical facilitation [34] and depressed intracortical inhibition is correlated with decreased quadriceps voluntary activation capability [35], external focus training may provide a means to restore quadriceps muscle activity via increasing intracortical inhibition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01078-wDOI Listing
February 2019

Physical Exercise and Epigenetic Modifications in Skeletal Muscle.

Sports Med 2019 Feb 19. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Department of Sports Medicine, University Medicine Tübingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 6, D-72076, Tübingen, Germany.

Physical activity and sports play major roles in the overall health status of humans. It is well known that regular exercise helps to lower the risk for a broad variety of health problems, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. Being physically active induces a wide variety of molecular adaptations, for example fiber type switches or other metabolic alterations, in skeletal muscle tissue. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s40279-019-01070-4
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01070-4DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Vertebral Artery Dissection in Sport: A Systematic Review.

Sports Med 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

University of Canberra Research Institute for Sport and Exercise (UCRISE), Canberra, ACT, Australia.

Background: Vertebral artery dissection (VAD) is a potentially catastrophic injury that may occur during sports participation. A comprehensive review is needed to collate documented cases to improve understanding and inform future preventative approaches.

Objective: This review aimed to understand the extent of VAD in sport and characterise trends suggestive of mechanisms of injury. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s40279-019-01066-0
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01066-0DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Criteria-Based Return to Sport Decision-Making Following Lateral Ankle Sprain Injury: a Systematic Review and Narrative Synthesis.

Sports Med 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Faculty of Physical Education and Physiotherapy, Human Physiology Research Group, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050, Brussels, Belgium.

Objective: The aim of this systematic review was to identify prospective studies that used a criteria-based return to sport (RTS) decision-making process for patients with lateral ankle sprain (LAS) injury.

Design: Systematic review and narrative synthesis.

Data Sources: The PubMed (MEDLINE), Web of Science, PEDro, Cochrane Library, SPORTDiscus (EBSCO), ScienceDirect, and Scopus databases were searched to 23 November 2018. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01071-3DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read
5.038 Impact Factor

Estimated Age of First Exposure to American Football and Neurocognitive Performance Amongst NCAA Male Student-Athletes: A Cohort Study.

Sports Med 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Kinesiology and Applied Physiology, University of Delaware, 349 Tower at STAR, 100 Discovery Blvd, Newark, DE, 19713, USA.

Background: Repetitive head impacts in young athletes are potentially detrimental to later life (e.g., age 50 + years) neurological function; however, it is unknown what the short-term effects (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01069-xDOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Is Heat Intolerance State or Trait?

Sports Med 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Korey Stringer Institute, Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA.

The existing literature suggests two standpoints in defining heat intolerance, which are heat tolerance as state or trait. The former bases its case in the plasticity of human physiology, where one may gain or lose the adaptations associated with heat acclimatization and the ability to tolerate heat is considered transient. This phenomenon is exemplified in the recovery process of exertional heat stroke (EHS) patients in that victims of EHS are able to eventually regain heat tolerance and return to activity without recurrent episodes of EHS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01067-zDOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

The Relationship Between Motor Competence and Physical Fitness from Early Childhood to Early Adulthood: A Meta-Analysis.

Sports Med 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Sport Psychology, University of Münster, Horstmarer Landweg 62b, 49149, Münster, Germany.

Background: Motor competence and physical fitness are important factors for promoting positive trajectories of health over time. In 2008, Stodden and colleagues developed a model that discussed the role of both factors in physical activity. Furthermore, the authors hypothesized that the relationship between motor competence and physical fitness is reciprocal and changes over time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01068-yDOI Listing
February 2019

Physical Literacy, Physical Activity and Health: Toward an Evidence-Informed Conceptual Model.

Sports Med 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Physical Therapy, College of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.

Physical literacy (PL) provides a powerful lens for examining movement in relation to physical activity (PA) and motor skill outcomes, environmental context, and broader social and affective learning processes. To date, limited consideration has been given to the role PL plays in promoting positive health behaviours. There is no clear conceptual framework based on existing empirical evidence that links PL to health, nor has an evidence-informed case been made for such a position. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01063-3DOI Listing
February 2019

A Physiologically Based Approach to Prescribing Exercise Following a Sport-Related Concussion.

Sports Med 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Nutrition, Food, and Exercise Sciences, The Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA.

Clinical management of concussion has evolved over the last 20 years, and complete cognitive and physical rest remains a common clinical recommendation. The duration of rest may vary widely, from 24-48 h to several weeks or until the patient's symptoms have resolved or returned to near baseline levels. Following a period of rest, a stepwise progression of exercise is used for gradual return to play or to work. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01065-1DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Youth Distance Running: Strategies for Training and Injury Reduction.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2019 Feb;18(2):53-59

Department of Family Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN.

Running is a popular sport for children in the United States. However, review of available literature on health effects and safety recommendations for youth running has not been previously conducted. Unique factors for injury include periods of growth during puberty and potential for growth plate injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000564DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction in the Female Athlete.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2019 Feb;18(2):49-52

Department of Pediatrics and Sports Medicine Institute, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL.

Pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) is a term used to describe a variety of disorders involving moderate to severe impairment of the pelvic floor muscles. It can be divided into two broad categories. Relaxing PFD is more common, presenting with urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, or pelvic organ prolapse. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000563DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Using Ultrasound and Clinical Tools to Diagnose Gout.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2019 Feb;18(2):46-48

Department of Family Medicine, Uniformed Services, University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000562DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Developing Physician Leaders.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2019 Feb;18(2):45

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000561DOI Listing
February 2019

Medical Provision for Obstacle Course Races.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2019 Feb;18(2):43-44

UPMC Department of PM&R and Orthopedic Surgery, Pittsburgh, PA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000566DOI Listing
February 2019

Principles of Motor Learning to Support Neuroplasticity After ACL Injury: Implications for Optimizing Performance and Reducing Risk of Second ACL Injury.

Sports Med 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Exercise Science & Neuroscience Unit, Department Exercise and Health, Faculty of Science, Paderborn University, Paderborn, Germany.

Athletes who wish to resume high-level activities after an injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are often advised to undergo surgical reconstruction. Nevertheless, ACL reconstruction (ACLR) does not equate to normal function of the knee or reduced risk of subsequent injuries. In fact, recent evidence has shown that only around half of post-ACLR patients can expect to return to competitive level of sports. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01058-0DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Effects of Catheterization on Artery Function and Health: When Should Patients Start Exercising Following Their Coronary Intervention?

Sports Med 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Science, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 3AF, UK.

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of death worldwide, and percutaneous transluminal coronary angiography (PTCA) and/or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI; angioplasty) are commonly used to diagnose and/or treat the obstructed coronaries. Exercise-based rehabilitation is recommended for all CAD patients; however, most guidelines do not specify when exercise training should commence following PTCA and/or PCI. Catheterization can result in arterial dysfunction and acute injury, and given the fact that exercise, particularly at higher intensities, is associated with elevated inflammatory and oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and a pro-thrombotic milieu, performing exercise post-PTCA/PCI may transiently elevate the risk of cardiac events. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01055-3DOI Listing
February 2019
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Comment on: "Equity in Physical Activity: A Misguided Goal".

Sports Med 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Plymouth Marjon University, Plymouth, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-018-01047-9DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Reply to Williams et al.: Comment on: "Equity in Physical Activity: A Misguided Goal".

Authors:
James L Nuzzo

Sports Med 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Neuroscience Research Australia, Barker Street, Randwick, NSW, 2031, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-018-01050-0DOI Listing
January 2019

The Accuracy of Acquiring Heart Rate Variability from Portable Devices: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Sports Med 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Kinesiology, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, USA.

Background: Advancements in wearable technology have provided practitioners and researchers with the ability to conveniently measure various health and/or fitness indices. Specifically, portable devices have been devised for convenient recordings of heart rate variability (HRV). Yet, their accuracies remain questionable. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01061-5DOI Listing
January 2019
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Institutional Guidelines for Resistance Exercise Training in Cardiovascular Disease: A Systematic Review.

Sports Med 2019 Jan 30. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Graduate Program in Physical Activity Sciences, Salgado de Oliveira University, Bloco A, Rua Marechal Deodoro, 217, bloco A, Centro, Niterói, RJ, CEP 24030-060, Brazil.

Background: Institutional position stands are useful for practitioners when designing exercise routines for specific populations. Resistance training has been included in programs for patients with cardiovascular disease.

Objective: The objective of this systematic review was to analyze institutional guidelines providing recommendations for resistance training applied to cardiovascular disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01059-zDOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Comment on "Review of WADA Prohibited Substances: Limited Evidence for Performance-Enhancing Effects".

Sports Med 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Mind, Brain and Behaviour Research Centre, University of Granada, Campus Universitario de Cartuja s/n, 18011, Granada, Spain.

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s40279-019-01064-2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01064-2DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Bone Bruises Associated with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury as Indicators of Injury Mechanism: A Systematic Review.

Sports Med 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Division of Physical Therapy, Center for Human Movement Science, School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB# 7135 Bondurant Hall, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599-7135, USA.

Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is one of the most common injuries in sports, and the injury mechanisms are not completely clear. Bone bruises seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following ACL injuries may provide significant information for determining ACL injury mechanisms.

Objective: The aim was to determine ACL injury mechanisms through an evaluation of locations of bone bruises associated with ACL injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01060-6DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Reply to Holgado et al.: Comment on "Review of WADA Prohibited Substances: Limited Evidence for Performance-Enhancing Effects".

Sports Med 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Centre for Human Drug Research, Zernikedreef 8, 2333 CL, Leiden, The Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01062-4DOI Listing
January 2019

Exploring the Justifications for Selecting a Drop Landing Task to Assess Injury Biomechanics: A Narrative Review and Analysis of Landings Performed by Female Netball Players.

Sports Med 2019 Jan 25. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

The University of the Sunshine Coast, 90 Sippy Downs Drive, Sippy Downs, QLD, Australia.

When assessing biomechanics in a laboratory setting, task selection is critical to the production of accurate and meaningful data. The injury biomechanics of landing is commonly investigated in a laboratory setting using a drop landing task. However, why this task is so frequently chosen is unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-018-01045-xDOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Reflecting on Eliud Kipchoge's Marathon World Record: An Update to Our Model of Cooperative Drafting and Its Potential for a Sub-2-Hour Performance.

Sports Med 2019 Feb;49(2):167-170

Department of Health and Human Performance, University of Houston, 3875 Holman St, Houston, TX, 77204-6015, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01056-2DOI Listing
February 2019
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Exit Gluten-Free and Enter Low FODMAPs: A Novel Dietary Strategy to Reduce Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Athletes.

Authors:
Dana M Lis

Sports Med 2019 Feb;49(Suppl 1):87-97

Department of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University California Davis, Davis, CA, 95616, USA.

Exercise-associated physiological disturbances alter gastrointestinal function and integrity. These alterations may increase susceptibility to dietary triggers, namely gluten and a family of short-chain carbohydrates known as FODMAPs (fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols). A recent surge in the popularity of gluten-free diets (GFDs) among athletes without celiac disease has been exacerbated by unsubstantiated commercial health claims and high-profile athletes citing this diet to be the secret to their success. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-018-01034-0DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Fruit-Derived Polyphenol Supplementation for Athlete Recovery and Performance.

Sports Med 2019 Feb;49(Suppl 1):3-23

School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia.

Polyphenols are characterised structurally by two or more hydroxyl groups attached to one or more benzene rings, and provide the taste and colour characteristics of fruits and vegetables. They are radical scavengers and metal chelators, but due to their low concentration in biological fluids in vivo their antioxidant properties seem to be related to enhanced endogenous antioxidant capacity induced via signalling through the Nrf2 pathway. Polyphenols also seem to possess anti-inflammatory properties and have been shown to enhance vascular function via nitric oxide-mediated mechanisms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-018-0998-xDOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Heat, Hydration and the Human Brain, Heart and Skeletal Muscles.

Sports Med 2019 Feb;49(Suppl 1):69-85

Centre for Human Performance, Exercise and Rehabilitation, College of Health and Life Sciences, Brunel University London, Uxbridge, UB8 3PH, UK.

People undertaking prolonged vigorous exercise experience substantial bodily fluid losses due to thermoregulatory sweating. If these fluid losses are not replaced, endurance capacity may be impaired in association with a myriad of alterations in physiological function, including hyperthermia, hyperventilation, cardiovascular strain with reductions in brain, skeletal muscle and skin blood perfusion, greater reliance on muscle glycogen and cellular metabolism, alterations in neural activity and, in some conditions, compromised muscle metabolism and aerobic capacity. The physiological strain accompanying progressive exercise-induced dehydration to a level of ~ 4% of body mass loss can be attenuated or even prevented by: (1) ingesting fluids during exercise, (2) exercising in cold environments, and/or (3) working at intensities that require a small fraction of the overall body functional capacity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-018-1033-yDOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Food-First Approach to Enhance the Regulation of Post-exercise Skeletal Muscle Protein Synthesis and Remodeling.

Sports Med 2019 Feb;49(Suppl 1):59-68

Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 906 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL, 61801, USA.

Protein recommendations are provided on a daily basis as defined by the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) at 0.80 g protein/kg/day. However, meal-based, as opposed to daily, dietary protein recommendations are likely more informative given the role of the daily protein distribution pattern in modulating the post-exercise muscle protein synthetic response. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-018-1009-yDOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Phytochemicals for Improving Aspects of Cognitive Function and Psychological State Potentially Relevant to Sports Performance.

Authors:
David O Kennedy

Sports Med 2019 Feb;49(Suppl 1):39-58

Brain, Performance and Nutrition Research Centre, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 8ST, UK.

Subjective alertness and optimal cognitive function, including in terms of attention, spatial/working memory and executive function, are intrinsic to peak performance in many sports. Consumption of a number of plant-derived 'secondary metabolite' phytochemicals can modulate these psychological parameters, although there is a paucity of evidence collected in a sporting context. The structural groups into which these phytochemicals fall-phenolics, terpenes and alkaloids-vary in terms of the ecological roles they play for the plant, their toxicity and the extent to which they exert direct effects on brain function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-018-1007-0DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

From Paper to Podium: Quantifying the Translational Potential of Performance Nutrition Research.

Sports Med 2019 Feb;49(Suppl 1):25-37

Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Science, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 3AF, UK.

Sport nutrition is one of the fastest growing and evolving disciplines of sport and exercise science, demonstrated by a 4-fold increase in the number of research papers between 2012 and 2018. Indeed, the scope of contemporary nutrition-related research could range from discovery of novel nutrient-sensitive cell-signalling pathways to the assessment of the effects of sports drinks on exercise performance. For the sport nutrition practitioner, the goal is to translate innovations in research to develop and administer practical interventions that contribute to the delivery of winning performances. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-018-1005-2DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Performance Nutrition for Athletes.

Sports Med 2019 Feb;49(Suppl 1):1-2

Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, N1G 2W1, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-018-1027-9DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Match Running Performance in Young Soccer Players: A Systematic Review.

Sports Med 2019 Feb;49(2):289-318

FMRP Faculty of Medicine at Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Avenue Bandeirantes 3900-Monte Alegre, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, 14049-900, Brazil.

Background: To date, athletic performance has been extensively assessed in youth soccer players through laboratory and field testing. Only recently has running performance via time-motion analysis been assessed during match play. Match running data are often useful in a practical context to aid game understanding and decision making regarding training content and prescriptions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-018-01048-8DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Impact of Ad Libitum Versus Programmed Drinking on Endurance Performance: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis.

Sports Med 2019 Feb;49(2):221-232

Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, Northern California Health Care System, Sacramento, CA, USA.

Background: Debate continues on how athletes should hydrate during exercise. Several studies have recently been published comparing the effect of ad libitum (ALD) and programmed drinking (PD) on endurance performance (EP).

Objective: This work examined whether one drinking strategy offers an EP advantage over the other. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-018-01051-zDOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

The Muscle Protein Synthetic Response to Meal Ingestion Following Resistance-Type Exercise.

Sports Med 2019 Feb;49(2):185-197

Department of Human Biology, NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Protein ingestion following resistance-type exercise stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates and consequently enhances the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged training. Ingestion of ~ 20 g of quickly digestible protein isolate optimizes muscle protein synthesis rates during the first few hours of post-exercise recovery. However, the majority of daily protein intake is consumed as slower digestible, nutrient-rich, whole-food protein sources as part of mixed meals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01053-5DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Learned Helplessness After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: An Altered Neurocognitive State?

Sports Med 2019 Jan 18. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

University of Connecticut, 2095 Hillside Road, U-1110, Storrs, CT, 06269, USA.

Traumatic knee injuries, such as anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) sprains, have detrimental effects on long-term health as they initiate a cycle of chronic pain, physical inactivity, and disability. Alterations in strength and neural activity are factors that contribute to rehabilitation failure after ACL reconstruction (ACLR); however, psychological deficits also hinder rehabilitative success. Neural impairments observed following injury and ACLR may be associated with psychological dysfunction, a phenomenon defined as learned helplessness (LH). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01054-4DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Revised Approach to the Role of Fatigue in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analyses.

Sports Med 2019 Jan 18. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Exercise Science & Neuroscience Unit, Department Exercise & Health, Faculty of Science, University of Paderborn, Paderborn, Germany.

Background: Causes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are multifactorial. Anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention should thus be approached from a multifactorial perspective as well. Training to resist fatigue is an underestimated aspect of prevention programs given that the presence of fatigue may play a crucial role in sustaining an ACL injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01052-6DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Eliminating Fighting and Head Hits from Hockey: Opportunities and Barriers.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2019 Jan;18(1):35-40

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sports Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Removing fighting from ice hockey is an essential concussion prevention strategy that will improve the safety of the game at all levels. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000556DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Proceedings from the Ice Hockey Summit III: Action on Concussion.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2019 Jan;18(1):23-34

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

The Ice Hockey Summit III provided updated scientific evidence on concussions in hockey to inform these five objectives: 1) describe sport-related concussion (SRC) epidemiology, 2) classify prevention strategies, 3) define objective, diagnostic tests, 4) identify treatment, and 5) integrate science and clinical care into prioritized action plans and policy. Our action plan evolved from 40 scientific presentations. The 155 attendees (physicians, athletic trainers, physical therapists, nurses, neuropsychologists, scientists, engineers, coaches, and officials) voted to prioritize these action items in the final Summit session. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000557DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Sports-related Concussion - Genetic Factors.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2019 Jan;18(1):20-22

Department of Family and Community Medicine, Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM.

Genetic biomarkers have been evaluated for validity in predicting risk for sports-related concussion as well as prognosticating recovery from this injury. Research results from predominantly small-scale pilot studies thus far are mixed and preliminary findings have not been adequately replicated. Currently, the use of such genetic biomarkers should be considered investigational and not for routine clinical use. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000555DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

When Is It Safe to Drive after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury/Sports-related Concussion?

Curr Sports Med Rep 2019 Jan;18(1):17-19

Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM.

Driving an automobile has inherent danger, and driving after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI)/sports-related concussion (SRC) can make this task even more hazardous. There is evidence to suggest that restriction from driving for the first 24 to 48 h after mTBI/SRC is probably reasonable. However, after the first 48 h have passed, there is insufficient evidence to make a recommendation regarding return to driving. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000558DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Medical and Musculoskeletal Concerns for the Wheelchair Athlete: A Review of Preventative Strategies.

Authors:
Rebecca A Dutton

Curr Sports Med Rep 2019 Jan;18(1):9-16

University of New Mexico, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation.

Adaptive sports refers to organized sporting activities that are practiced by individuals with disabilities and are worthwhile to maintain physical and psychological health. As adaptive sports participation continues to rise, health care providers must have an enhanced understanding of injury and illness patterns specific to the adaptive athlete. Early recognition and prevention are important to ensure safe and successful participation in sport. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000560DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Are Young Athletes Strong Enough for Sport? DREAM On.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2019 Jan;18(1):6-8

Centre for Exercise and Sport Science Research, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000554DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Pondering the Perils of Too Much Iron and Round Red Cells.

Authors:
E Randy Eichner

Curr Sports Med Rep 2019 Jan;18(1):2-3

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000559DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Featuring Evan Stuart Bass, MD.

Authors:
Lori Tish

Curr Sports Med Rep 2019 Jan;18(1)

American College of Sports Medicine, Indianapolis, IN.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0000000000000552DOI Listing
January 2019
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Authors' Reply to Kindermann et al.'s Comment on: "Athlete's Heart: Diagnostic Challenges and Future Perspectives".

Sports Med 2019 Jan 8. Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Institute of Cardiology, Department of Neuroscience, Imaging and Clinical Sciences, "G. d'Annunzio" University, Chieti, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-018-01044-yDOI Listing
January 2019
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Comment on: "Athlete's Heart: Diagnostic Challenges and Future Perspectives".

Sports Med 2019 Jan 8. Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Sports and Exercise Physiology, University Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-018-01043-zDOI Listing
January 2019
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Reply to Lewin and O'Driscoll: Comment on: "Monitoring of Post-Match Fatigue in Professional Soccer: Welcome to the Real World".

Sports Med 2019 Jan 3. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Performance Department, Paris Saint-Germain Football Club, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-018-01049-7DOI Listing
January 2019
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Comment on: "Monitoring of Post-match Fatigue in Professional Soccer: Welcome to the Real World".

Sports Med 2019 Jan 3. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Arsenal Football Club, Performance and Research Department, Colney, London, AL2 1DR, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-018-01046-wDOI Listing
January 2019
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