623 results match your criteria Spinal Stenosis and Neurogenic Claudication


Natural Course and Diagnosis of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: WFNS Spine Committee Recommendations.

World Neurosurg X 2020 Jul 28;7:100073. Epub 2020 Feb 28.

Neurosurgery Department, Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Milan, Italy.

Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is defined as a degenerative disorder showing a narrowing of the spinal canal. The diagnosis is straightforward in cases with typical neurogenic claudication symptoms and unequivocal imaging findings. However, not all patients present with typical symptoms, and there is obviously no correlation between the severity of stenosis and clinical complaint. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wnsx.2020.100073DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7322797PMC

Minimally invasive lumbar decompression: a review of indications, techniques, efficacy and safety.

Pain Manag 2020 Jul 1. Epub 2020 Jul 1.

Florida Pain Institute, Melbourne, FL 32940, USA.

Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common degenerative spine condition. In properly selected patients, minimally invasive lumbar decompression () may be an option to improve outcomes. This review provides an in-depth description of the  procedure and a comprehensive examination of safety and efficacy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/pmt-2020-0037DOI Listing

A new interspinous process distraction device BacFuse in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis with 5 years follow-up study.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2020 Jun;99(26):e20925

Department of Orthopedics, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China.

To explore a suitable indication of interspinous process distraction device for lumbar spinal stenosis with BacFuse.Patients of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) who experienced interspinous process distraction device surgery with BacFuse from June 2014 to January 2015 in our institute were included. We classified LSS into central and lateral types, and then divided these into severe and moderate according to the degree of stenosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000020925DOI Listing

The Impact of Age on the Outcomes of Minimally Invasive Lumbar Decompression for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

Med Devices (Auckl) 2020 4;13:151-161. Epub 2020 Jun 4.

Center for Pain Relief, Charleston, WV, USA.

Background And Purpose: Minimally invasive lumbar decompression () is an effective long-term therapy for patients with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) resulting primarily from hypertrophic ligamentum flavum (HLF). Most subjects in clinical studies of the procedure have been older adults (age≥65). While the incidence of LSS increases with age, a substantial number of adults (age<65) also suffer from neurogenic claudication secondary to HLF. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/MDER.S251556DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7280254PMC

Comparative Study Between Uniportal Full-Endoscopic Interlaminar and Tubular Approach in the Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Pilot Study.

Global Spine J 2020 Apr 28;10(2 Suppl):70S-78S. Epub 2020 May 28.

Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain.

Study Design: Multicenter, prospective, randomized, and double-blinded study.

Objectives: To compare tubular and endoscopic interlaminar approach.

Methods: Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and neurogenic claudication of were randomized to tubular or endoscopic technique. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2192568219878419DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7263328PMC

Etiology-Based Classification of Adjacent Segment Disease Following Lumbar Spine Fusion.

HSS J 2020 Jul 30;16(2):130-136. Epub 2019 Oct 30.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, 1611 W. Harrison St., Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.

Background: Adjacent segment disease (ASDz) is a potential complication following lumbar spinal fusion. A common nomenclature based on etiology and ASDz type does not exist and is needed to assist with clinical prognostication, decision making, and management.

Questions/purposes: The objective of this study was to develop an etiology-based classification system for ASDz following lumbar fusion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11420-019-09723-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7253547PMC

Normative data of a smartphone app-based 6-minute walking test, test-retest reliability, and content validity with patient-reported outcome measures.

J Neurosurg Spine 2020 May 29:1-10. Epub 2020 May 29.

1Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Zurich and Clinical Neuroscience Center, University of Zurich, Switzerland.

Objective: The 6-minute walking test (6WT) is used to determine restrictions in a subject's 6-minute walking distance (6WD) due to lumbar degenerative disc disease. To facilitate simple and convenient patient self-measurement, a free and reliable smartphone app using Global Positioning System coordinates was previously designed. The authors aimed to determine normative values for app-based 6WD measurements. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2020.3.SPINE2084DOI Listing

The necessity and risk factors of subsequent fusion after decompression alone for lumbar spinal stenosis with lumbar spondylolisthesis: 5 years follow-up in two different large populations.

Spine J 2020 May 15. Epub 2020 May 15.

Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 E. 70th St, New York, NY 10021, USA; Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address:

Background/context: Although decompression without fusion is a reasonable surgical treatment option for some patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) secondary to spondylolisthesis, some of these patients will require secondary surgery for subsequent fusion. Long-term outcome and need for subsequent fusion in patients treated with decompression alone in the setting of lumbar spondylolisthesis remains controversial.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the rate, timing, and risk factors of subsequent fusion for patients after decompression alone for LSS with spondylolisthesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.spinee.2020.04.026DOI Listing

Funicular pain: a case report of intermittent claudication induced by cervical cord compression.

BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2020 May 14;21(1):302. Epub 2020 May 14.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Wakayama Medical University, 811-1 Kimiidera, Wakayama City, Wakayama, 641-8509, Japan.

Background: Neurogenic origin intermittent claudication is typically caused by lumbar spinal canal stenosis. However, there are few reports of intermittent claudication caused by cervical spinal cord compression.

Case Presentation: We present the case of a 75-year-old woman who presented with intermittent claudication. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12891-020-03299-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7227285PMC

The Role of Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgical Procedures in the Elderly Patient: An Analysis of 49 Patients Between 75 and 95 Years of Age.

Cureus 2020 Mar 4;12(3):e7180. Epub 2020 Mar 4.

Neurosurgery, University of Miami Hospital, Miami, USA.

As the population gets older, yet remains active, the number of patients presenting with symptomatic spinal disease over the age of 75 increases. These include pain from osteoporotic spinal fractures, lumbar degenerative disease, as well as radiculopathy or neurogenic claudication from stenosis over the age of 75 and older increases. While some of these patients are very healthy, taking minimal medication, many are not good candidates for more invasive surgical procedures under general anesthesia because of medical co-morbidities such as insulin-dependent diabetes and medication use such as anti-coagulants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.7180DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7123291PMC

Prevalence and Risk Factors of Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis and Intermittent Claudication: CT Angiography Study.

J Korean Med Sci 2020 Apr 6;35(13):e87. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Background: It can be difficult to differentiate between vascular and neurogenic intermittent claudication. The exact diagnosis often cannot be made on clinical evidence and ultimately requires imaging. Perioperative screening for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) patients is important because untreated PAD increases the risk of severe vascular events. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3346/jkms.2020.35.e87DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7131903PMC

Systematic Review of Outcomes Following 10-Year Mark of Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis.

Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2020 Jun;45(12):820-824

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.

Study Design: We performed a comprehensive search of PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE for all English language studies of all levels of evidence pertaining to Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT), in accordance with Preferred Reported Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines.

Objective: We aim to summarize the 10-year clinical outcomes of SPORT and its numerous follow-up studies for degenerative spondylolisthesis.

Summary Of Background Data: The SPORT was a landmark randomized control trial including approximately 2500 patients at 13 clinics across the country. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BRS.0000000000003485DOI Listing

Idiopathic Epidural Lipomatosis Associated with Degenerative Discopathy: Grand Round Presentation of Unusual Lumbar Canal Stenosis Resolved by Weight Loss.

Asian J Neurosurg 2020 Jan-Mar;15(1):180-183. Epub 2020 Feb 25.

Department of Spinal Surgery Unit, Bordeaux University Hospital, Bordeaux University, C.H.U Tripode Pellegrin, Place Amélie Raba Léon, 33076 Bordeaux, France.

Here, we report a case of idiopathic epidural lipomatosis presented with a clinical picture of lumbar canal stenosis with neurogenic claudication which resolved completely only by weight loss. A 53-year-old obese male with a body mass index of 36 without significant past medical history presented to the outpatient clinic with neurogenic claudication and bilateral sciatic radiculopathy. Initially, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed epidural lipomatosis at the level of L5 vertebral body and L5-S1 intervertebral disc. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ajns.AJNS_255_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7057873PMC
February 2020

Lumbar Canal Stenosis: A Prospective Clinicoradiologic Analysis.

J Neurol Surg A Cent Eur Neurosurg 2020 Feb 27. Epub 2020 Feb 27.

Department of Orthospine, Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, New Delhi, India.

Background:  Although spinal canal narrowing is thought to be the defining feature for the clinical diagnosis of lumbar canal stenosis, the degree of spinal canal stenosis necessary to elicit neurologic symptoms is not clear. Several studies have been performed to detect an association between a narrow spinal canal and clinical symptoms. Through our prospective study, we compared the radiologic criteria with the clinical criteria using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and assessed how they correlate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0039-1698393DOI Listing
February 2020
0.493 Impact Factor

Prevalence of lumbar spinal stenosis in general and clinical populations: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Eur Spine J 2020 Feb 24. Epub 2020 Feb 24.

Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, Center for Muscle and Joint Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

Purpose: To estimate the prevalence of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) in adults, identified by clinical symptoms and/or radiological criteria.

Methods: Systematic review of the literature. Pooled prevalence estimates by care setting and clinical or radiological diagnostic criteria were calculated and plotted [PROSPERO ID: CRD42018109640]. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00586-020-06339-1DOI Listing
February 2020

Minimally Invasive Lumbar Decompression and Interspinous Process Device for the Management of Symptomatic Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: a Literature Review.

Curr Pain Headache Rep 2020 Feb 18;24(4):13. Epub 2020 Feb 18.

Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.

Purpose Of Review: Symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a condition affecting a growing number of individuals resulting in significant disability and pain. Traditionally, treatment options have consisted of conservative measures such as physical therapy, medication management, epidural injections and percutaneous adhesiolysis, or surgery. There exists a treatment gap for patients failing conservative measures who are not candidates for surgery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11916-020-0845-2DOI Listing
February 2020

Relationship Between Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings and Clinical Symptoms in Patients with Suspected Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis: a Case-control Study.

Acta Inform Med 2019 Dec;27(4):229-233

Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Orthopedic Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran.

Introduction: Despite the availability of many imaging and clinical criteria for diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), its correct diagnosis is a challenge for clinicians and radiologists.

Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and clinical symptoms in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with suspected LSS in MRI.

Methods: This study is a case-control study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5455/aim.2019.27.229-233DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7004287PMC
December 2019

Priapism associated with lumbar stenosis: case report and literature review.

J Spine Surg 2019 Dec;5(4):596-600

Department of Neurosurgery, UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is characterized by narrowing of the central canal, lateral recesses, or foramina leading to compression of neural tissue. The clinical syndrome associated with LSS is usually neurogenic claudication, which often presents as lower back and extremity pain, numbness, and tingling upon ambulation. Autonomic dysfunction is rarely observed in patients with LSS; however, a subset of male patients has been reported to experience intermittent priapism associated with the onset of neurogenic claudication symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/jss.2019.09.23DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6989923PMC
December 2019

AAPT Diagnostic Criteria for Chronic Low Back Pain.

J Pain 2020 Feb 6. Epub 2020 Feb 6.

Department of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon.

Chronic low back pain (CLBP) conditions are highly prevalent and constitute the leading cause of disability worldwide. The Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations Innovations Opportunities and Networks (ACTTION) public-private partnership with the US Food and Drug Administration and the American Pain Society (APS), have combined to create the ACTTION-APS Pain Taxonomy (AAPT). The AAPT initiative convened a working group to develop diagnostic criteria for CLBP. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpain.2020.01.008DOI Listing
February 2020
4.010 Impact Factor

Successful use of percutaneous interspinous spacers and adjunctive spinoplasty in a 9 year cohort of patients.

J Neurointerv Surg 2020 Jul 22;12(7):673-677. Epub 2020 Jan 22.

NeuroInterventional Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Purpose: Lumbar spinal canal stenosis and lumbar spinal foraminal stenosis are common, degenerative pathologies which can result in neurogenic claudication and have a negative impact on function and quality of life. Percutaneous interspinous devices (PIDs) are a recently-developed, minimally-invasive, alternative treatment option. This study details a 9 year single-centre experience with PIDs and examines the complementary use of spinous process augmentation (spinoplasty) to reduce failure rates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/neurintsurg-2019-015601DOI Listing

Influence of Lumbar Stenosis Surgery on Sacroiliac Joint Pain-Long-Term Results.

World Neurosurg 2020 Apr 10;136:e386-e392. Epub 2020 Jan 10.

Department of Radiology, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida, USA.

Objective: To investigate whether sacroiliac join (SIJ) pain can be secondary to walking with a flexed posture resulting from stenosis with neurogenic claudication, and resolves spontaneously after lumbar decompression.

Methods: A review of charts from January 1, 2014, through March 3, 2019, was performed to identify consecutive cases of adults 35 years of age or older with surgical spinal stenosis with neurogenic claudication as well as concomitant severe SIJ pain. Posture was considered flexed during walking if self-reported, confirmed by a close companion, or observed directly. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2020.01.017DOI Listing

Congenital Spinal Canal Stenosis with Ossification of the Ligamentum Flavum in an Achondroplastic Patient: A Case Report and Literature Review.

Asian J Neurosurg 2019 Oct-Dec;14(4):1231-1235. Epub 2019 Nov 25.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Spine Unit, Institute of Orthopaedics, Lerdsin Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand.

Achondroplasia has an effect on intracartilaginous ossification during the development of the spine resulting in a narrow spinal canal. This abnormal anatomy could make an achondroplastic patient tend to have spinal canal stenosis. We reported a case of congenital spinal canal stenosis with achondroplasia combined with ossified ligamentum flavum (OLF) at the thoracolumbar and lumbar spine, which was treated by decompressive surgery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ajns.AJNS_170_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6896628PMC
November 2019

Redundant nerve roots in lumbar spinal stenosis: inter- and intra-rater reliability of an MRI-based classification.

Neuroradiology 2020 Feb 14;62(2):223-230. Epub 2019 Dec 14.

Radiology Office Raboisen 38, Hamburg, Germany.

Purpose: Patients with central lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) have a longer symptom history, more severe stenosis, and worse postoperative outcomes, when redundant nerve roots (RNRs) are evident in the preoperative MRI. The objective was to test the inter- and intra-rater reliability of an MRI-based classification for RNR.

Methods: This is a retrospective reliability study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00234-019-02337-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6971136PMC
February 2020

Feasibility and Outcomes of Tubular Decompression in Extreme Stenosis.

Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2020 Jun;45(11):E647-E655

Mumbai Spine Scoliosis and Disc Replacement Centre, Bombay Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Mumbai, India.

Study Design: Retrospective cohort study.

Objectives: To report the feasibility, nuances, technical tips as well as outcomes of managing single-level grade D (extreme stenosis) and to compare the outcomes with nonextreme stenosis using the tubular retractor system.

Summary Of Background Data: Minimally invasive decompression in extreme stenosis is a challenge due to technical difficulty, feasibility of adequate decompression, and a steep learning curve. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BRS.0000000000003359DOI Listing

A Review of Emerging Evidence for Utilization of a Percutaneous Interspinous Process Decompression Device to Treat Symptomatic Lumbar Adjacent-Segment Degeneration.

Pain Med 2019 12;20(Suppl 2):S9-S13

Milestone Research Organization, San Diego, California.

Objective: Postlaminectomy syndrome diagnoses secondary to adjacent segment degeneration are a substantial and rising cause of morbidity in the United States. Emerging spinal cord neuromodulation technologies have produced successful outcomes for postlaminectomy neuropathic pain but are less effective in treating neurogenic claudication secondary to recurrent lumbar stenosis. Percutaneous interspinous process decompression systems can be used as a salvage treatment modality for persistent structural neurogenic claudication in postlaminectomy syndrome or after spinal cord stimulator implantation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pm/pnz247DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7182911PMC
December 2019

A Review of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with Intermittent Neurogenic Claudication: Disease and Diagnosis.

Pain Med 2019 12;20(Suppl 2):S32-S44

Precision Spine Care, Texas Spine and Joint Hospital, Tyler, Texas, USA.

Objective: Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a degenerative spinal condition affecting nearly 50% of patients presenting with lower back pain. The goal of this review is to present and summarize the current data on how LSS presents in various populations, how it is diagnosed, and current therapeutic strategies. Properly understanding the prevalence, presentation, and treatment options for individuals suffering from LSS is critical to providing patients the best possible care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pm/pnz161DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7101166PMC
December 2019

Cost-effectiveness and Safety of Interspinous Process Decompression (Superion).

Pain Med 2019 12;20(Suppl 2):S2-S8

MileStone Research Organization, San Diego, California, USA.

Objective: There are several treatment options for patients suffering from lumbar spinal stenosis, including surgical and conservative care. Interspinous spacer decompression using the Superion device offers a less invasive procedure for patients who fail conservative treatment before traditional decompression surgery. This review assesses the current cost-effectiveness, safety, and performance of lumbar spinal stenosis treatment modalities compared with the Superion interspinous spacer procedure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pm/pnz245DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6896024PMC
December 2019

Systematic Review of Outcomes Following 10-year Mark of Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) for Spinal Stenosis.

Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2020 Jun;45(12):832-836

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.

Study Design: We performed a comprehensive search of Pubmed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE for all English-language studies of all levels of evidence pertaining to SPORT, in accordance with Preferred Reported Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analayses (PRISMA) guidelines.

Objective: We aim to summarize the 10-year clinical outcomes of SPORT and its numerous follow-up studies for spinal stenosis.

Summary Of Background Data: The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) was a landmark randomized control trial including approximately 2,500 patients at 13 clinics across the country. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BRS.0000000000003323DOI Listing

Intermittent penile erection in lumbar spinal stenosis: Report of four new cases and review.

Surg Neurol Int 2019 25;10:209. Epub 2019 Oct 25.

Pars Advanced and Minimally Invasive Medical Manners Research Center, Pars Hospital, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) classically presents with intermittent neurogenic claudication. Rarely, however, it may cause unanticipated, unpleasant, involuntary, and transient penile erections without sexual stimulation along with urinary urgency and claudication.

Case Description: The authors present four males with LSS whose principal symptoms were intermittent neurogenic claudication and unanticipated erections while walking, accompanied by urinary urgency. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.25259/SNI_368_2019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6826299PMC
October 2019

[Unilateral approach for over the top bilateral lumbar decompression].

Oper Orthop Traumatol 2019 Dec 14;31(6):513-535. Epub 2019 Nov 14.

Schön Klinik München Harlaching, Wirbelsäulenzentrum, Harlachinger Str. 51, 81547, München, Deutschland.

Objective: The main goal is bilateral microsurgical decompression of the cauda equina using a unilateral over the top approach. The challenge is to achieve decompression with minimal iatrogenic trauma to anatomical structures in the approach region and in the target area.

Indications: Degenerative spinal disorders including lumbar central stenosis, lumbar lateral recess spinal stenosis, and foraminal narrowing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00064-019-00632-zDOI Listing
December 2019

Alteration of the lysophosphatidic acid and its precursor lysophosphatidylcholine levels in spinal cord stenosis: A study using a rat cauda equina compression model.

Sci Rep 2019 11 12;9(1):16578. Epub 2019 Nov 12.

Department of Clinical Laboratory Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

Cauda equina compression (CEC) is a major cause of neurogenic claudication and progresses to neuropathic pain (NP). A lipid mediator, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), is known to induce NP via the LPA receptor. To know a possible mechanism of LPA production in neurogenic claudication, we determined the levels of LPA, lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and LPA-producing enzyme autotaxin (ATX), in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and spinal cord (SC) using a CEC as a possible model of neurogenic claudication. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-52999-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6851136PMC
November 2019

Factors Associated with Successful Response to Balloon Decompressive Adhesiolysis Neuroplasty in Patients with Chronic Lumbar Foraminal Stenosis.

J Clin Med 2019 Oct 23;8(11). Epub 2019 Oct 23.

Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505, Korea.

Epidural neuroplasty, often called percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis, is often performed in refractory patients with chronic lumbar radiculopathy or neurogenic claudication. Recent studies have showed that decompressive adhesiolysis with an inflatable balloon catheter (balloon neuroplasty) is efficient in patients who experience refractory pain from epidural steroid injection or even epidural neuroplasty with a balloon-less catheter. However, exact indications or predictive factors for epidural balloon neuroplasty have not been fully evaluated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm8111766DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6912426PMC
October 2019
2 Reads

Are There Differences Between Patients with Extreme Stenosis and Non-extreme Stenosis in Terms of Pain, Function or Complications After Spinal Decompression Using a Tubular Retractor System?

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2020 02;478(2):348-356

A. G. Kulkarni, S. Das, T. S. Kunder, Mumbai Spine Scoliosis and Disc Replacement Centre, Bombay Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Mumbai, India.

Background: Micro-tubular decompression in extreme lumbar spinal stenosis is challenging because it is technically difficult to achieve adequate decompression. Whether the results of micro-tubular decompression related to pain, function, and complications in lumbar spinal stenosis of the extreme and non-extreme varieties are different has not yet been conclusively established.

Questions/purposes: Are there differences between patients with extreme stenosis and non-extreme stenosis in terms of (1) VAS back or leg pain, (2) Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), or (3) complications when they were treated with spinal decompression using a tubular retractor system?

Methods: Between January 2007 and January 2017, one surgeon performed 325 single-level lumbar micro-tubular decompressions without fusion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000001004DOI Listing
February 2020
1 Read

Interspinous Process Decompression With The Superion Spacer For Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Real-World Experience From A Device Registry.

Med Devices (Auckl) 2019 3;12:423-427. Epub 2019 Oct 3.

Independent Clinical Consultant, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA.

Background: Interspinous process decompression (IPD) with stand-alone spacers has demonstrated excellent long-term clinical benefit for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS).

Methods: IPD used the Superion Indirect Decompression System (Vertiflex, Carlsbad, CA, USA). Perioperative and clinical data were captured via a registry for patients treated with IPD for LSS with intermittent neurogenic claudication. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/MDER.S220431DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6781846PMC
October 2019
1 Read

The Use of Vertiflex® Interspinous Spacer Device in Patients With Lumbar Spinal Stenosis and Concurrent Medical Comorbidities.

Cureus 2019 Aug 12;11(8):e5374. Epub 2019 Aug 12.

Neurological Surgery, University of Miami Hospital, Miami, USA.

The use of the Vertiflex® interspinous spacer is a recent minimal invasive procedure useful in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). It is used mostly by interventional pain physicians who can also perform the minimally invasive lumbar decompression (MILD procedure). Previously when a patient had clinical symptomatic neurogenic claudication (NC) and radiologic findings of lumbar stenosis and had failed conservative treatment, the options were decompressive laminectomy, laminectomy with pedicle fixation at one or more levels or laminotomy combined with interlaminar stabilization (Coflex® implant). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.5374DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6786837PMC
August 2019
2 Reads

Long-term results for total lumbar facet joint replacement in the management of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis.

J Neurosurg Spine 2019 Oct 4:1-6. Epub 2019 Oct 4.

2Spine Unit, Yitzhak Shamir Medical Center, Zerifin, and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University; and.

Objective: The authors evaluated the long-term clinical outcome of a total posterior arthroplasty system in the surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis with degenerative spondylolisthesis.

Methods: Between June 2006 and July 2007, 10 patients with neurogenic claudication due to spinal stenosis and single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis were enrolled in a nonrandomized prospective clinical study. The patients were evaluated with radiographs and MRI scans, the visual analog scale (VAS) for back and leg pain, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and the SF-36 health survey preoperatively and at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, 7 years, and 11 years postoperatively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2019.7.SPINE19150DOI Listing
October 2019
1 Read

[Lumbar spondylolisthesis; common, but surgery is rarely needed].

Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 2019 09 24;163. Epub 2019 Sep 24.

Zuyderland Medisch Centrum, afd. Neurochirurgie, Heerlen.

Lumbar spondylolisthesis is usually asymptomatic. However, symptomatic spondylolisthesis results in back and/or leg pain such as radicular syndrome or neurogenic claudication. Variation in symptoms is caused by different types of spondylolisthesis. Read More

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September 2019
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Provocative Walking Test of Strength for Diagnosis, Management, and Outcome Assessment of Symptomatic Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

Authors:
Bruce H Dobkin

Neurorehabil Neural Repair 2019 12 22;33(12):1003-1007. Epub 2019 Sep 22.

Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

. Clinical care and randomized trials of rehabilitation or surgery for symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis with neurogenic claudication (LSS) are complicated by the lack of standard criteria for diagnosis and outcome measurement. . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1545968319876256DOI Listing
December 2019
2 Reads

Missed thoracic myelopathy: Do not throw the hammer away yet.

Surg Neurol Int 2019 9;10:158. Epub 2019 Aug 9.

Norton Neuroscience Institute, Norton Healthcare, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky, USA.

Background: Spinal stenosis may result in myelopathy, radiculopathy, and neurogenic claudication. It is often difficult to differentiate between these conditions. A comprehensive history and physical examination and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the entire spine accurately confirm the diagnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.25259/SNI_352_2019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6744758PMC
August 2019
2 Reads

Avoiding inappropriate spine surgery in a patient with major cardiac comorbidities.

Authors:
Nancy E Epstein

Surg Neurol Int 2019 26;10:44. Epub 2019 Mar 26.

Professor of Clinical Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook, New York, and Chief of Neurosurgical Spine and Education, NYU Winthrop Hospital, NYU Winthrop NeuroScience/Neurosurgery, Mineola, New York 11501, USA.

Background: We as spine surgeons increasingly need to carefully screen our own patients for major medical/cardiac comorbidities to determine if they are candidates for spine surgery. Our medical/cardiac colleagues rarely understand how long anti-platelet aggregates and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) have to be stopped prior to spine operaeitons, and when it is safe for them to be reinstated.

Case Study: A patient over 65 years of age, presented with 6 months of increased bilateral lower extremity sciatica, and 2-block neurogenic claudication. Read More

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http://surgicalneurologyint.com/surgicalint-articles/avoidin
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http://dx.doi.org/10.25259/SNI-57-2019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6743689PMC
March 2019
4 Reads

Diagnosis and management of lumbar spinal stenosis in primary care in France: a survey of general practitioners.

BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2019 Sep 14;20(1):431. Epub 2019 Sep 14.

Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Rééducation et Réadaptation de l'Appareil Locomoteur et des Pathologies du Rachis, Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris Centre-Groupe Hospitalier Cochin, 27, Rue du Faubourg Saint-Jacques, 75014, Paris, France.

Background: Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a common spinal condition and the most frequent indication for spinal surgery in elderly people. General practitioners (GPs) are on the 1 line for its diagnosis and treatment. We aimed to assess how GPs diagnose and treat people with LSS in France. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12891-019-2782-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6745066PMC
September 2019
3 Reads

[Continuous hyperCKemia without calf muscle hypertrophy associated with S1 radiculopathy].

Rinsho Shinkeigaku 2019 Sep 30;59(9):592-595. Epub 2019 Aug 30.

Department of Neurology, Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital.

A 72-year-old man presented with continuous hyperCKemia and intermittent claudication. He exhibited no calf muscle hypertrophy at that time or afterward. Other than an increased creatine kinase (CK) level (1,525 U/l), none of the laboratory tests was abnormal, including that for myositis-related autoantibodies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5692/clinicalneurol.cn-001281DOI Listing
September 2019
2 Reads

SHADES of grey - The challenge of 'grumbling' cauda equina symptoms in older adults with lumbar spinal stenosis.

Musculoskelet Sci Pract 2020 Feb 12;45:102049. Epub 2019 Aug 12.

Bolton Foundation Trust, UK.

Diagnosing cauda equina syndrome is challenging in older adults with lumbar spinal stenosis. Understanding these challenges is vital for clinicians who are faced with difficult decisions about when to refer for investigation or surgical management. This is a growing clinical issue because of the escalating prevalence of lumbar spinal stenosis in our ageing population, and increasing demands on healthcare services including imaging and surgical services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msksp.2019.102049DOI Listing
February 2020
3 Reads

Symptomatic tandem spinal stenosis: a clinical, diagnostic, and surgical challenge.

Neurosurg Rev 2019 Aug 13. Epub 2019 Aug 13.

Neurosurgical Unit, Geneva University Hospitals, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1205, Geneva, Switzerland.

Tandem spinal stenosis (TSS) is an entity which refers to spinal canal diameter narrowing in at least two distinct regions of the spine. When symptomatic, management of TSS is controversial. In this study, we present a consecutive series of patients with symptomatic TSS and report diagnostic and surgical challenges. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10143-019-01154-9DOI Listing
August 2019
4 Reads

Open facet joint denervation as an adjunct in patients undergoing posterior lumbar decompression for spinal stenosis-a single blinded randomized controlled trial.

J Spine Surg 2019 Jun;5(2):259-265

Kingston Health Sciences Centre and Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada.

Background: Facet radiofrequency denervation is a prevalent procedure used to try and relieve back pain. Despite the increasing use of this treatment, its effectiveness has been questioned. In consideration of the conflicting reports in the literature, we sought to conduct a trial to study the short-term effect of facet denervation in patients undergoing lumbar laminectomy(s) to determine the short-term effect of adding facet denervation to patients undergoing lumbar laminectomy(s) where the anatomy was exposed, allowing an open technique to be used for the denervation. Read More

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http://jss.amegroups.com/article/view/4565/4967
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/jss.2019.05.06DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6626737PMC
June 2019
4 Reads

Full-Endoscopic Resection of Ligamentum Flavum Cyst in Lumbar Spine.

World Neurosurg 2019 Oct 23;130:427-431. Epub 2019 Jul 23.

Department of Neurosurgery, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address:

Background: Cysts of the ligamentum flavum (LF) are rare occurrences, with only a few cases reported in literature. They are a result of age-related degenerative changes in the LF. The cyst compresses the neural elements and causes neurogenic symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2019.07.120DOI Listing
October 2019
1 Read
2.417 Impact Factor

Neuro-navigation assisted pre-psoas minimally invasive oblique lumbar interbody fusion (MI-OLIF): New roads and impediments.

Neurol India 2019 May-Jun;67(3):803-812

Department of Neurosurgery, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Introduction: Minimally invasive spine-oblique lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-OLIF) has emerged as a novel anterolateral, retroperitoneal, "pre-psoas" approach for lumbar interbody fusion for degenerative spinal instability, as well as for correction of deformity in patients without severe canal stenosis. In the last decade, the technique has gained popularity owing to several advantages like the minimal blood loss, minimal tissue dissection, preservation of posterior tension bands, better biomechanical strength, provision of mechanical stability to the lumbar spine, and a larger footprint of the implant, associated with it. It, thus, maximises load bearing on the cortical bone, and provides a better lordotic correction of the lumbar spine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0028-3886.263262DOI Listing
February 2020
3 Reads
1.084 Impact Factor

Cauda equina syndrome without motor dysfunction following lumbar spinal stenosis surgery: A case report.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2019 Jul;98(29):e16396

Department of Orthopaedics, The Second Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin, China.

Rationale: Cauda equina syndrome (CES) refers to a group of symptoms that occur when the nerves in the cauda equina become compressed or damaged. The most common etiology of CES is lumbar intervertebral disc herniation, but CES following lumbar spinal surgery is rare, especially without motor dysfunction. Herein, we illustrate a case of CES that developed as a complication of spinal surgery and to deduce its possible underlying cause. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000016396DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6709168PMC
July 2019
5 Reads

Relationship Between Cauda Equina Conduction Time and Type of Neurogenic Intermittent Claudication due to Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

J Clin Neurophysiol 2020 Jan;37(1):62-67

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Yamaguchi Rosai Hospital, Yamaguchi, Japan.

Introduction: This study investigated whether the prolongation of the cauda equina conduction time (CECT) was related to the type of neurogenic intermittent claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis.

Methods: In total, 149 patients who underwent surgery due to lumbar spinal stenosis with neurogenic intermittent claudication were classified into three groups as follows: cauda equina-type(n = 67), radicular-type(n = 29), and mixed-type(n = 53). Cauda equina conduction time was measured by placing disc electrodes on the abductor hallucis muscle, electrically stimulating the tibial nerve of the ankle and recording the compound muscle action potentials and F-waves. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WNP.0000000000000607DOI Listing
January 2020
5 Reads

Delayed Diagnosis of Tandem Spinal Stenosis: A Retrospective Institutional Review.

Int J Spine Surg 2019 Jun 30;13(3):283-288. Epub 2019 Jun 30.

Department of Orthopaedics, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland.

Background: Tandem spinal stenosis (TSS) is defined as simultaneous spinal stenosis in the cervical, thoracic, and/or lumbar regions and may present with both upper and lower motor neuron symptoms, neurogenic claudication, and gait disturbance. Current literature has focused mainly on the prevalence of TSS and treatment methods, while the incidence of delayed TSS diagnosis is not well defined. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of delayed TSS diagnosis at our institution and describe the clinical characteristics commonly observed in their particular presentation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14444/6038DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6625710PMC
June 2019
4 Reads