22,784 results match your criteria Southern medical journal[Journal]


Outcomes in Patients with Left Ventricular Assist Devices, Pacemakers, and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Undergoing Single Balloon Enteroscopy.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):130-134

From the Departments of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, Internal Medicine, and Evidence-Based Medicine and Research Outcomes, University of South Florida, Tampa.

Objectives: Obscure overt gastrointestinal bleeding can be challenging to evaluate in patients with electronic cardiac devices such as continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), pacemakers (PPMs), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). Limited data exist on the utility and safety of single balloon enteroscopy (SBE) in patients with cardiac devices. We aimed to evaluate the safety, efficacy, diagnostic, and therapeutic outcomes of the aforementioned devices in patients undergoing SBE. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000938DOI Listing
February 2019
5 Reads

An Underappreciated and Prolonged Drug Interaction Leads to Ineffective Anticoagulation.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):125-129

From the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy, Memphis, Memphis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Memphis, Tennessee, and the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis.

A poorly understood significant drug-drug interaction compounded by ineffective communication among providers at times of care transition most likely contributed to multiple thromboembolic events in an 81-year-old patient. Increased awareness of drug interactions with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), as well as improved communication among inpatient and outpatient providers at the time of discharge is essential in maximizing efficacy and safety outcomes in patients requiring chronic anticoagulation. When rifampin is coadministered with apixaban, a reduction in apixaban exposure results in decreased efficacy and increased risk for thromboembolic events. Read More

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http://sma.org/southern-medical-journal/article/an-underappr
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000926DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Imaging in Acute Pyelonephritis: Utilization, Findings, and Effect on Management.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):118-124

From Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, and the University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine, Aurora.

Objectives: To determine the frequency, timing, and types of imaging obtained in patients with a discharge diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis, and how often imaging findings affect therapy.

Methods: This was a retrospective chart review of 1062 adults with a diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis discharged from an urban, safety-net hospital between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012. From the 739 patients selected after exclusions, we determined the number and proportion of patients imaged within the first 24 hours of admission, stratified by risk factors for pyelonephritis complications, and the frequency of positive findings leading to invasive interventions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000936DOI Listing
February 2019
6 Reads

Cancer Risk Awareness among Uninsured Primary Care Patients.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):112-117

From the Department of Sociology, the School of Medicine, and the Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Utah, and the Maliheh Free Clinic, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Objectives: Underserved populations are at risk of low cancer risk awareness. The purpose of this study was to examine cancer risk awareness and lifestyle issues among uninsured primary care patients in the United States.

Methods: Data were collected using a self-administered survey from May to July 2017 of adult free clinic patients (N = 506) who spoke English or Spanish. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000937DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Can C-Reactive Protein Be Used to Predict Acute Septic Arthritis in the Adult Population?

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):108-111

From Arrowe Park Hospital, Wirral, and Hull York Medical School, York, United Kingdom.

Objectives: The objective of this study was to establish whether C-reactive protein (CRP) could be used to predict native joint septic arthritis (SA) in the adult population.

Methods: All patients who underwent native joint aspiration in accident and emergency settings between April 2012 and September 2016 were identified from laboratory microbiology records. Patients were divided into three groups for analysis: patients with SA, patients with crystal arthropathy, and patients with normal or osteo/inflammatory arthritic joints. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000927DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Commentary on "Strengthening Rural States' Capacity to Prepare for and Respond to Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2013-2015".

Authors:
Mary Jane Burton

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):106-107

From the G.V. "Sonny" Montgomery Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000931DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Strengthening Rural States' Capacity to Prepare for and Respond to Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2013-2015.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):101-105

From the Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, the Oklahoma State Department of Health, Oklahoma City, and the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Helena.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000930DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6365294PMC
February 2019

Healthcare Disparities in People with Disabilities: Is There a Cure?

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):98-100

From the Neiswanger Institute, Loyola University, Chicago, Illinois.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000928DOI Listing
February 2019

The Importance of Health and Social Services Spending to Health Outcomes in Texas, 2010-2016.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):91-97

From the Arizona State University School for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Phoenix, and the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.

Objectives: Public health and social services spending have been shown to improve health outcomes at the county level, although there are significant state and regional variations in such spending. Texas offers an important opportunity for examining nuances in the patterns of association between local government health and social services spending and population health outcomes. The primary objectives of this study were to describe local investments in education, health, and social services at the county-area level for all of Texas from 2002 through 2012 and to examine how changes in local investment over time were associated with changes in health outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000935DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Curing Health Care by Adding Value: How About a Physical Examination?

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):89-90

From Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Florida.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000925DOI Listing
February 2019

Signed, Sealed, Delivered: Increasing Patient Notification of Test Results in an Internal Medicine Resident Continuity Clinic.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):85-88

From the Department of Internal Medicine, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Baton Rouge, the Department of Medicine, University of Alabama, Birmingham, and the Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama.

Objectives: Informing patients of their test results is an important patient safety issue, yet many physicians perform dismally in this regard. Residents often face additional barriers to communicating test results to patients. We wanted to determine whether streamlining the notification process, communicating expectations, and having residents audit their performance would increase result notification rates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000929DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Commentary on "What Attracts Medical Students to Primary Care? A Nominal Group Evaluation".

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):83-84

From the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine and the Office of Health Equity and Inclusion, University of Utah Health Sciences Campus, Salt Lake City, Utah.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000934DOI Listing
February 2019

What Attracts Medical Students to Primary Care? A Nominal Group Evaluation.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):76-82

From the Departments of Medicine and Family and Community Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, the Department of Medical Education, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, and Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.

Objective: To examine the perceptions of first-year medical students on their experiences in primary care.

Methods: Nominal group technique sessions were conducted with first-year medical students for 5 years. Questions were designed to evaluate primary care experiences and the role of primary care physicians. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000933DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Comparison of Medical Student Communication Skills Measured by Standardized Patients During an OSCE and by Faculty During an In-Hospital Encounter.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):70-75

From the Department of Internal Medicine, University New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque.

Objectives: At our institution, learner communication skills during an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) are measured by standardized patients (SPs) using the New Mexico Clinical Communication Scale (NM-CCS). Faculty physicians also conduct a direct observation of a clinical encounter (DOCE) to observe students' interactions with real hospitalized patients. The objective of this study was to determine whether students have similar communication skills scores with real patients as compared with SPs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000932DOI Listing
February 2019

Addressing Mental Health Needs among Physicians.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):67-69

From the John Peter Smith Family Medicine Residency, Fort Worth, Texas, the Waukesha Family Medicine Residency/University of Wisconsin, Waukesha, the Department of Family Medicine, University of Massachusetts School of Medicine, Worchester, and San Joaquin General Hospital, French Camp, California.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000924DOI Listing
February 2019

Healthcare Professionals and In-Flight Medical Emergencies: Resources, Responsibilities, Goals, and Legalities as a Good Samaritan.

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):60-65

Common in-flight emergencies include syncope, respiratory symptoms, nausea/vomiting, cardiac symptoms, and seizures. Flight conditions, such as changes in air pressure and humidity, can exacerbate existing chronic medical conditions. In 2017, US airlines carried 849. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000922DOI Listing
January 2019
12 Reads

Clinical Utility of Routine Chest X-Rays During the Initial Stabilization of Trauma Patients.

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):55-59

From the San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, the William Beaumont Army Medical Center, Fort Bliss, the Army Medical Department (AMEDD) Center and School, Fort Sam Houston, and the US Army Institute for Surgical Research, San Antonio, Texas.

Objectives: The Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course encourages the use of chest x-ray (CXR) to identify injuries that may change clinical management during the initial stage of trauma resuscitations. Several studies have failed to show benefit for the routine use of CXR without a clinical indication, however. We sought to validate these findings by determining the incidence of clinically significant findings discovered on a portable single-view CXR during the initial stabilization of trauma patients at a Level 1 trauma center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000921DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Ebola 101.

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):54

University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000909DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Commentary on "Evaluation of Patients for Zika Virus Infection in a Travel Clinic in the Southeast United States, 2016".

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):52-53

From the Internal Medicine Department, European University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000918DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Evaluation of Patients for Zika Virus Infection in a Travel Clinic in the Southeast United States, 2016.

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):45-51

From the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine and the Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, and the School of Public Health, State University of New York, Albany.

Objectives: Zika virus is an emerging infection that has posed vexing challenges to the US public health system. Improved characterization of patients with possible and confirmed infection is needed to better understand risks for infection in US travelers and to inform evolving evaluation guidelines.

Methods: We performed a retrospective electronic health record review of patients evaluated for Zika virus infection at an academic travel clinic in Atlanta, Georgia, from January 1 through August 31, 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000917DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Radiologic versus Endoscopic Placement of Gastrostomy Tube: Comparison of Indications and Outcomes at a Tertiary Referral Center.

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):39-44

From the University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Greenville, the Departments of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, the Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, and the Department of Internal Medicine, Ochsner Medical Center Jefferson, Louisiana.

Objectives: Percutaneous gastrostomy tube placement is performed in patients requiring long-term enteral nutrition. Although both endoscopic and fluoroscopic techniques may be used, there are inherent risks and potential complications associated with both procedures that are not generally known to referring physicians. The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast indications for placement and procedurally related complications between fluoroscopic and endoscopic gastrostomy tubes techniques at a tertiary care facility. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000916DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Patients' Perceptions of the Role of Physicians in Questioning and Educating in Firearms Safety: Post-FOPA Repeal Era.

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):34-38

From Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Florida and Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Health Professions Division, College of Pharmacy, Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida.

Objectives: In this study, we determined patients' attitudes toward discussing firearms and issues of firearms safety with emergency department physicians. We assessed whether patients feel discriminated against should physicians discuss firearms safety, and whether they believed that physician counseling may change how patients store firearms.

Methods: From June to October 2017, we conducted a cross-sectional institutional review board-approved survey of 200 consenting adult patients (convenience sample) not requiring critical care presenting to the emergency department of Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach, Florida. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000915DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Editor's Response.

Authors:
G Richard Holt

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):33

University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, Texas.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000920DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Uterine Surrogacy is Morally Equivalent to Selling a Kidney.

Authors:
Conor McCartney

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):32

Saint Louis University School of Medicine St Louis, Missouri.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000910DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Frequency, Timing, and Types of Medication Ordering Errors Made by Residents in the Electronic Medical Records Era.

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):25-31

From the Departments of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Quantitative Health Sciences in the Lerner Research Institute, Internal Medicine, and Pharmacy, and the Center for Value Based Care Research, Cleveland Clinic, and the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.

Objectives: To describe associations between resident level of training, timing of medication orders, and the types of inpatient medication ordering errors made by internal medicine residents.

Methods: This study reviewed all inpatient medication orders placed by internal medicine residents at a tertiary care academic medical center from July 2011 to June 2015. Medication order errors were measured by pharmacists' reporting of an error via the electronic medical record during real-time surveillance of orders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000923DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Impact of Inpatient Consults by a Family Medicine Teaching Service.

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):21-24

From the Departments of Community Health and Family Medicine and Health Outcomes and Policy, University of Florida, Gainesville.

Objectives: Inpatient consult rates by family physicians significantly affect many aspects of medical care. Limited research has investigated the consultant rate by family medicine residents and their impact on length of stay (LOS) and direct cost. This study examines the inpatient consultant rate of family medicine residents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000911DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads
1.116 Impact Factor

Children's Age, Family Conflict, and Children's HbA1c: Are Girls and Boys Different?

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):16-20

From the Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics, and Environmental Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health, Brownsville, and the Department of Pediatrics, Boonshoft School of Medicine, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio.

Objective: This study examined the relation between children's sex, age, family conflict, and children's glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c).

Methods: Parents of children with type 1 diabetes mellitus were recruited from the diabetes clinic of a midwestern children's hospital. The survey included demographics and the Diabetes Family Conflict Scale (DFCS). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000912DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Commentary on "Prenatal Contraceptive Counseling by Video".

Authors:
Maryam Sattari

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):14-15

From the Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000914DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Prenatal Contraceptive Counseling by Video.

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):8-13

From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Objective: Effective postpartum contraception can improve interpregnancy intervals. Opportunities exist for counseling and education during prenatal care. Few studies have assessed the use of multimedia as a tool to improve long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) use postpartum. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000913DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

A Brochure to Improve Understanding of Incomplete Mammogram Results Among Black Women at a Public Hospital in Miami, Florida.

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):1-7

From the Department of Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, the Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, and the Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut.

Objectives: Black women are at increased risk of being called back for additional studies after a screening mammogram. With focus group input, we developed a brochure to improve awareness of the frequency of abnormal results. This study explored the brochure's acceptability and effect on understanding risk and breast cancer fears among black mammography patients at an urban safety-net breast imaging center in Miami, Florida. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000919DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Impact of an Innovative Psychiatric Consultation Liaison Model on Provider Satisfaction with Care of Behaviorally Complex Patients.

South Med J 2018 Dec;111(12):772-775

From the Departments of Psychiatry and Hospital Medicine, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Objectives: The increasing behavioral acuity and complexity of hospitalized patients overwhelms providers' capacity to effectively manage their behaviors. Hospitals must train their providers in how to cope with these behaviors to provide high-quality care. In addition to improved patient care, increased capacity to manage these challenging patients may improve resilience and reduce the risk and rates of provider burnout. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000897DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Commentary on "A Misguided Venture: Presidential Fitness and the Duty to Warn".

Authors:
Manuel Cepeda

South Med J 2018 Dec;111(12):770-771

Retired from the Department of Psychiatry, University of South Alabama, Mobile, Alabama.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000895DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

A Misguided Venture: Presidential Fitness and the Duty to Warn.

South Med J 2018 Dec;111(12):767-769

From the Air Force Judge Advocate General's Corps and the University of the Incarnate Word School of Osteopathic Medicine, San Antonio, Texas.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000894DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Demographic and Practice Characteristics of Physicians Who Care for Medically Underserved People: A National Survey.

South Med J 2018 Dec;111(12):763-766

From the Saint James School of Medicine, Park Ridge, Illinois, the Department of Health Services Research and Administration, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Ripon College, Ripon, Wisconsin, and the Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

Objectives: Few national studies have examined the influence of role models as a potential predictor for caring for medically underserved (MUS) patients. This study tested associations between previous physician role model exposure and caring for MUS populations, as well as examines the practice environments of these physicians.

Methods: Between October and December 2011, we mailed a confidential questionnaire to a representative sample of 2000 US physicians from various specialties. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000898DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Influences on Primary Care Provider Imaging for a Hypothetical Patient with Low Back Pain.

South Med J 2018 Dec;111(12):758-762

From the Division of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, and the Division of General Internal Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.

Objective: How outside factors affect physician decision making remains an open question of vital importance. We sought to investigate the importance of various influences on physician decision making when clinical guidelines differ from patient preference.

Methods: An online survey asking 469 primary care providers (PCPs) across four practice sites whether they would order magnetic resonance imaging for a patient with uncomplicated back pain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000901DOI Listing
December 2018
11 Reads

Uremic Pericarditis: Distinguishing Features in a Now-Uncommon Clinical Syndrome.

South Med J 2018 Dec;111(12):754-757

From the Hospital Medicine Unit and the Core Educator Faculty and Renal Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, the Heart and Vascular Center, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

We present the case of a 47-year-old man with a history of diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy who was admitted to our hospital with acute uremic myopericarditis. Echocardiography demonstrated a fibrinous pericardial effusion. The patient was initiated on hemodialysis for hyperkalemia, metabolic acidosis, and uremia. Read More

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http://sma.org/southern-medical-journal/article/uremic-peric
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000899DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6281170PMC
December 2018
20 Reads

Invasive Mechanical Ventilation.

South Med J 2018 Dec;111(12):746-753

From the Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.

Invasive mechanical ventilation is a potentially lifesaving intervention for acutely ill patients. The goal of this review is to provide a concise, clinically focused overview of basic invasive mechanical ventilation for the many clinicians who care for mechanically ventilated patients. Attention is given to how common ventilator modes differ in delivering a mechanical breath, evaluation of respiratory system mechanics, how to approach acute changes in airway pressure, and the diagnosis of auto-positive end-expiratory pressure. Read More

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http://sma.org/southern-medical-journal/article/invasive-mec
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000905DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6284234PMC
December 2018
15 Reads

Maternal/Perinatal Outcome in Women with Sickle Cell Disease: A Comparison of Two Time Periods.

South Med J 2018 Dec;111(12):742-745

From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City.

Objective: To compare pregnancy outcomes in women with sickle cell disease from recent deliveries with a similar group delivered earlier.

Methods: During a 12-year period (2005-2016), data from pregnant women with hemoglobin SS or SC were collected from three university medical centers and compared with earlier studies (1979-2003) involving similar patients. The primary endpoints were maternal complications during pregnancy and newborn outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000900DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Stress Electrocardiography vs Radionuclide Myocardial Perfusion Imaging among Patients Admitted for Chest Pain: Comparison of Teaching and Nonteaching Hospital Services.

South Med J 2018 Dec;111(12):739-741

From the Department of Internal Medicine, Boonshoft School of Medicine, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio.

Objectives: The American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation's Choosing Wisely initiative has identified the routine use of stress cardiac imaging among lower-risk patients as an expensive test that should be questioned by both physicians and patients. The objectives of this study were to determine how often patients hospitalized for chest pain are assessed with stress electrocardiography (stress ECG) compared with radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (rMPI) and to evaluate whether the cardiac testing guidelines of the American Heart Association and the Choosing Wisely campaign are being followed. We also sought to determine whether there were differences in practice patterns between a teaching and a nonteaching hospital service. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000896DOI Listing
December 2018
9 Reads

Teaching to Teach: An Effective and Feasible Teaching Curriculum for Internal Medicine Interns.

South Med J 2018 Dec;111(12):733-738

From the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Objectives: New competency requirements from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education have prompted greater emphasis on developing residents' teaching skills. Many residents make their first foray into teaching during internship, making it an important yet underrecognized opportunity to develop basic teaching skills. In addition, in the current graduate medical education climate, residents' tasks are compressed into an even shorter time, which has caused teaching opportunities and expectations to be balanced with the need for efficiency. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000908DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Medical Student H&Ps: Do You Have to Observe Them All At Once?

South Med J 2018 Dec;111(12):727-732

From the Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston.

Objectives: Direct observation of medical students' history and physical examination (H&P) skills by attendings is essential in ensuring trainees' competence. This study compared whether partial observations by multiple pediatric attendings across various clinical encounters versus a full observation by one attending affected students' performance on the pediatric Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) and the Year 3 Clinical Performance Examination (CPX3).

Methods: For the 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 academic years, 323 medical students submitted either H&P checklists completed by one attending observing an entire H&P (full observations) versus multiple attendings observing portions of the H&P (partial observations). Read More

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http://sma.org/southern-medical-journal/article/medical-stud
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000904DOI Listing
December 2018
10 Reads

Physician Advance Care Planning Experiences and Beliefs by General Specialty Status and Sex.

South Med J 2018 Dec;111(12):721-726

From the Departments of Family Medicine, Population and Public Health Sciences, and Pediatrics, Boonshoft School of Medicine, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio.

Objectives: Advance care planning (ACP) involvement could be substantially different by physician specialty or sex group, with implications for training and methods to increase ACP activities. The objective of this article is to compare primary care physicians (PCPs) and other specialty physicians and female compared with male physicians' views and interactions surrounding ACP.

Methods: This was a secondary analysis of an online anonymous survey distributed through a survey link to healthcare providers in hospital, ambulatory, and hospice settings in the greater Dayton, Ohio area in preparation for a community-wide advance care planning multitiered intervention. Read More

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http://sma.org/southern-medical-journal/article/physician-ad
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000903DOI Listing
December 2018
9 Reads

Adverse Events in the Efficacy of Crotalidae Polyvalent Immune Fab Antivenom vs Placebo in Recovery from Copperhead Snakebite Trial.

South Med J 2018 Dec;111(12):716-720

From the Division of Emergency Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, the Division of Emergency Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, the Department of Emergency Medicine, East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine, Greenville, North Carolina, the Department of Emergency Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, the Department of Emergency Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Texas A&M Health Sciences Center, Bryan, Rocky Mountain Poison & Drug Center, Denver, Colorado, the Department of Emergency Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, the Department of Emergency Medicine, Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia, the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, the Department of Surgery, East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine, Greenville, North Carolina, and the Department of Surgery, Marshall University, Huntington, West Virginia.

Objective: To compare the incidence of hypersensitivity reactions following copperhead envenomation treated with Fab antivenom (FabAV) or placebo.

Methods: Patients with copperhead snakebites received treatment and follow-up in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of FabAV or placebo. The treatment allocation ratio was 2:1 (FabAV:placebo). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000902DOI Listing
December 2018
4 Reads

Commentary on "Prehospital Airway Management in Iraq and Afghanistan: A Descriptive Analysis".

Authors:
G Richard Holt

South Med J 2018 Dec;111(12):714-715

From the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000907DOI Listing
December 2018
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Prehospital Airway Management in Iraq and Afghanistan: A Descriptive Analysis.

South Med J 2018 Dec;111(12):707-713

From the US Army Institute of Surgical Research, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, the 59th Medical Wing, Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, the San Antonio Military Medical Center, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, the Madigan Army Medical Center, Joint Base Lewis McChord, Washington, and the Army Medical Department Center and School Health Readiness Center of Excellence, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas.

Objectives: Airway failures are the second leading cause of potentially preventable death on the battlefield. Improvements in airway management depend on identifying current challenges. We sought to build on previously reported data on prehospital, combat airway management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000906DOI Listing
December 2018
14 Reads

Resource Utilization with the Use of Seclusion and Restraint in a Dedicated Emergency Psychiatric Service.

South Med J 2018 Nov;111(11):703-705

From the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky.

Objectives: There is a dearth of data regarding the use of emergency interventions in dedicated emergency psychiatric service settings, and reliable data are needed. This article describes the frequency and duration of the use of seclusion and restraint for imminent or existing agitation, aggression, or violence in a dedicated emergency psychiatric service located within an academic university hospital and staffed by sufficient numbers of trained personnel.

Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of 6 months' visits to a dedicated emergency psychiatric service. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000885DOI Listing
November 2018
13 Reads

Effects of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Infancy on Asthma and Respiratory Allergy in 6-Year-Old Children.

South Med J 2018 Nov;111(11):698-702

From George Mason University, College of Health and Human Services, Department of Health Administration and Policy, Fairfax, Virginia.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in early infancy and health conditions such as asthma and respiratory allergies at 6 years of age in a cohort of US children born at term with no medical issues at birth.

Methods: Data (1542 records) from the Infant Feeding Practices Study II and the Year Six Follow-Up study were used in the analysis. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were conducted to estimate the magnitude and direction of potential associations between children's health conditions such as asthma, hay fever, or respiratory allergy, and RSV infection during infancy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000881DOI Listing
November 2018
19 Reads

Vaginal Anatomy on MRI: New Information Obtained Using Distention.

South Med J 2018 Nov;111(11):691-697

From the Memphis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and the University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis.

Objectives: To demonstrate and confirm the presence of three anatomic zones of the vagina (a superficial sphincteric zone; a central wedge shaped transition zone; and a deep, expanded forniceal zone) using pelvic magnetic resonance imaging with contrast distention of the vagina.

Methods: A total of 107 consecutive female pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scans using vaginal contrast distention were retrospectively reviewed. The images were observed for the three-zone configuration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000889DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6211784PMC
November 2018
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Obesity and Weight-Biased Shaming in South Carolina: A Medical Student's Perspective.

South Med J 2018 Nov;111(11):690

Medical University of South Carolina, School of Medicine, Charleston, South Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000882DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read
1.120 Impact Factor

Author's Response.

Authors:
Maryam Sattari

South Med J 2018 Nov;111(11):689

University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000891DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read