22,810 results match your criteria Southern medical journal[Journal]


On "Importance of Interdisciplinary Medical Education: A Frontline Perspective".

South Med J 2019 Apr;112(4):252

St George's University of London, London, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000953DOI Listing

Know the New HIV Testing Guidelines?

South Med J 2019 Apr;112(4):251

University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000954DOI Listing

Comparison of Factors Identified by Patients and Physicians Associated with Hospital Readmission (COMPARE2).

South Med J 2019 Apr;112(4):244-250

From the Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research, University of Florida College of Pharmacy, Gainesville, the Department of Pharmacy, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and the Department of Community Health and Family Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville.

Objective: Factors contributing to hospital readmission have rarely been sought from the patient perspective. Furthermore, it is unclear how patients and physicians compare in identifying factors contributing to readmission. The objective of the study was to identify and compare factors contributing to hospital readmission identified by patients and physicians by surveying participants upon hospital readmission to a teaching medicine service. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000959DOI Listing

Native Joint Septic Arthritis: Comparison of Outcomes with Medical and Surgical Management.

South Med J 2019 Apr;112(4):238-243

From the Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, and the Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Veterans Affairs Healthcare Systems of Connecticut, West Haven.

Objective: To determine whether there are differences in the outcomes of native joint septic arthritis (SA) in adults, based on medical versus surgical management.

Methods: A 10-year retrospective single-center study was conducted of patients admitted to a tertiary care hospital between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2015 with a diagnosis of SA to compare outcomes based on the management approach taken: medical (bedside closed-needle joint aspiration) versus surgical (arthrotomy/arthroscopy). Evaluated outcomes included joint recovery, time to recovery, length of stay, disposition to home versus rehabilitation unit, recurrence of SA in the same joint, and mortality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000958DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Objectively Measured Physical Activity and All-Cause Mortality Among Cancer Survivors: National Prospective Cohort Study.

South Med J 2019 Apr;112(4):234-237

From the Center for Health Behavior Research, Department of Health, Exercise Science, and Recreation Management, University of Mississippi, University.

Objective: The understanding of the effects of physical activity on all-cause mortality among cancer survivors is limited. We attempted to draw a relation between physical activity and survival among those with a diagnosis of cancer.

Methods: Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was used, with follow-up through 2011. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000956DOI Listing

A Brief Review of the Pharmacology of Hyperkalemia: Causes and Treatment.

South Med J 2019 Apr;112(4):228-233

From the Department of Medicine, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, Missouri, Department of Pediatrics, Brookdale Hospital and Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, and Division of Pediatric Nephrology and Hypertension, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York.

Hyperkalemia is a common problem in both inpatients and outpatients. Many disease states (eg, chronic kidney disease) and medications may precipitate hyperkalemia. There are several drugs now available to treat hyperkalemia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000957DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Inconsistencies in Colonic Tattooing Practice: Differences in Reported and Actual Practices at a Tertiary Medical Center.

South Med J 2019 Apr;112(4):222-227

From the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, and the Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.

Objectives: Accurate localization of a colonic lesion is crucial to successful resection. Although colonic tattooing is a widely accepted technique to mark lesions for future identification surgery or repeat colonoscopy, no consensus guidelines exist. The objective of this study was to determine whether the current tattooing practice at a tertiary medical center differs from recommendations in the literature and self-reported provider practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000964DOI Listing

Meningitis: Approach to Lumboperitoneal Shunt Infection.

South Med J 2019 Apr;112(4):217-221

From the Department of Neurosurgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, and Department of Infectious Disease, Community Healthcare System, St Mary Medical Center, Hobart, Indiana.

is a rare, opportunistic pathogen most frequently contracted through contact with a contaminated source. An immunocompetent 26-year-old female patient presented to our institution with an infected lumboperitoneal (LP) shunt presenting as continued nonhealing wounds. After multiple debridements, shunt revisions, and wound closure failures, infectious disease specialists were consulted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000955DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Commentary on "Is Endurance Exercise Safe? The Myth of Pheidippides".

Authors:
G Richard Holt

South Med J 2019 Apr;112(4):215-216

From the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000963DOI Listing

Is Endurance Exercise Safe? The Myth of Pheidippides.

South Med J 2019 Apr;112(4):210-214

From the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock.

With the increase in participation in endurance events in the general population, patient concern may arise as to whether endurance exercise is safe. Acute but not chronic increases in blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and urine albumin occur in endurance exercise. Iron-deficiency anemia may be observed in female athletes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000961DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Outcomes in an Interdisciplinary Diabetes Clinic in Rural Primary Care.

South Med J 2019 Apr;112(4):205-209

From the Department of Family Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), St. Margaret, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary diabetes team model of care in assisting patients to achieve improved glucose control in a primary care rural setting.

Methods: A family medicine clinic at a rural university medical center developed an interdisciplinary diabetes team clinic composed of a certified diabetes educator/dietitian, a case manager, a pharmacist, nursing staff, a family medicine resident, a psychologist, and a board-certified family medicine attending physician. Patients were referred if their hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was ≥9% (75 mmol/mol); patients were seen for an initial consultation and for additional visits as needed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000960DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450414PMC

Evaluating the Burnout-Thriving Index in a Multidisciplinary Cohort at a Large Academic Medical Center.

South Med J 2019 Apr;112(4):199-204

From the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, and the Carilion Clinic, Roanoke, the University of Iowa College of Nursing, Iowa City, and Novant Health, Cornelius, North Carolina.

Objectives: There has been significant discussion about the quality of burnout research, especially with regard to abbreviated measurements of burnout and/or well-being. The purpose of this study was to compare a single-item, investigator-developed question measuring perceived well-being with validated multi-item measures of burnout and well-being.

Methods: Between 2016 and 2017, healthcare professionals and medical students at a large academic hospital system were sent an online survey measuring the risk of burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory), well-being (Physician or Nurse Well-Being Self-Assessment Tool), and perception of personal well-being (Burnout-Thriving Index [BTI], an investigator-developed, single-item measure). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000962DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Commentary on "Lessons Learned from Building a Pediatric-to-Adult Sickle Cell Transition Program".

South Med J 2019 Mar;112(3):198

From the Departments of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000951DOI Listing

Lessons Learned from Building a Pediatric-to-Adult Sickle Cell Transition Program.

South Med J 2019 Mar;112(3):190-197

From the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology and Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, and Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of California, San Francisco Benioff Children's Hospital, San Francisco.

Objective: More effective transitions and transfers of young people with sickle cell disease (SCD) into the adult healthcare setting is a focus of both primary care and specialty care medical organizations. Effective transition and transfer requires six core elements: establishing a policy, tracking progress, administering transition readiness assessments, planning for adult care, transferring to adult care, and integrating into an adult practice. We developed a program using these six core elements. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000950DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Improving Documentation of Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injuries (OASIS) Using a Standardized Electronic Template at Two University-Affiliated Institutions.

South Med J 2019 Mar;112(3):185-189

From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

Objectives: Adequate repair is vital to reduce the long-term sequelae of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS). Sufficient documentation is necessary to reflect the quality of care provided, to guide future management, and to reduce medicolegal liability. With the advent of electronic health records, proper methods of documentation can be more easily disseminated and applied for general use. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000945DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Advanced Prescription of Emergency Contraceptive Pills Among Adolescents and Young Adults.

South Med J 2019 Mar;112(3):180-184

From the Office of Public Health Studies and the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Women's Health, John A Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, the Home Visiting Services Unit, Maternal and Child Health Branch, the Hawaii State Department of Health, Honolulu, and the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg.

Objective: To examine healthcare providers' adherence to professional recommendations for advanced prescription of emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs).

Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 432 visits by 282 unique nonpregnant women 14 to 25 years of age seen at an obstetrics and gynecology teaching clinic to determine the percentage of visits during which advanced prescriptions of ECPs were provided when indicated. A logistic regression model, which accounted for nonindependent observations through generalized estimating equations, was used to identify factors associated with the provision of ECP advanced prescriptions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000941DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Contraceptive Methods and the Impact of Menstruation on Daily Functioning in Women with Sickle Cell Disease.

South Med J 2019 Mar;112(3):174-179

From the Vanderbilt-Meharry Center of Excellence in Sickle Cell Disease, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, Rodeghier Consultants, Chicago, Illinois, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, and Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke Hemostasis and Thrombosis Center, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

Objectives: Women with sickle cell disease (SCD) are living longer as a result of advances in the care of their underlying disease. With the population growing of women living with SCD, reproductive health issues in this population have become an emphasized area of medical care. We sought to describe current patterns of contraception use, menstruation, and quality-of-life (QOL) measures in women with SCD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000949DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Cesarean Delivery Among Alabama Providers.

South Med J 2019 Mar;112(3):170-173

From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Alabama, Birmingham.

Objectives: A multicenter, randomized controlled trial has demonstrated the benefit of adding azithromycin to routine preoperative antibiotics in unscheduled cesarean deliveries (CDs) to prevent surgical site infections. We sought to describe and identify barriers to the implementation of azithromycin prophylaxis for CDs by Alabama healthcare providers.

Methods: We conducted an online, self-administered survey of obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) providers in Alabama. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000943DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Impact of Holidays on Pediatric Trauma Admissions to a Community Hospital in South Florida.

South Med J 2019 Mar;112(3):164-169

From the Departments of Pediatric Trauma Services, Division of Acute Care Surgery and Trauma, and the Office of Human Research, Memorial Regional and Joe DiMaggio Children's Hospitals, Hollywood, Florida.

Objectives: The data from temperate regions indicate increases in pediatric traumatic injuries during the spring and summer months with anticipated admission spikes on warm weather holidays; hospitals in southern subtropical regions should not anticipate the same trends. The objectives of this study were to identify holiday-specific spikes in pediatric traumatic injury admissions at a community hospital in South Florida and report injury patterns in age, mechanism of injury, and surgical consults.

Methods: A 5-year retrospective review of pediatric traumatic injuries during holiday periods was conducted; patterns in age, mechanism of injury, and surgical consults were described. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000947DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Trauma Providers' Perceptions of Frailty Assessment: A Mixed-Methods Analysis of Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs.

South Med J 2019 Mar;112(3):159-163

From the Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma, Burn, and Critical Care Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, the School of Social Work, University of Washington, Seattle, the Department of Medicine, Division of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, the Department of Surgery, Section of General, Thoracic, and Vascular Surgery, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, the Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, the Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, the Department of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, the Department of Medicine, Division of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, the Department of Surgery, Division of General and Acute Care Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, and the Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma, Burn, and Critical Care Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

Objectives: Quality improvement in geriatric trauma depends on timely identification of frailty, yet little is known about providers' knowledge and beliefs about frailty assessment. This study sought to understand trauma providers' understanding, beliefs, and practices for frailty assessment.

Methods: We developed a 20-question survey using the Health Belief Model of health behavior and surveyed physicians, advanced practice providers, and trainees on the trauma services at a single institution that does not use formal frailty screening of all injured seniors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000948DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Flexible Sigmoidoscopy Rather than Colonoscopy Is Adequate for the Diagnosis of Ipilimumab-Associated Colitis.

South Med J 2019 Mar;112(3):154-158

From the Departments of Internal Medicine, Oncology, Pathology, and Gastroenterology, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, and Charlotte Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Huntersville, North Carolina.

Objectives: Treatment with ipilimumab, a cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 approved for metastatic melanoma can result in clinically significant immune-mediated drug injury in the form of colitis. Timely diagnosis and response are essential for optimal management. The aims of our study were to determine the percentage of our patients with ipilimumab-associated colitis in which the colitis could be diagnosed by flexible sigmoidoscopy only and to describe the variations in endoscopic and histologic findings as well as the patients' clinical courses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000944DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Awareness of Birth Cohort Hepatitis C Testing Recommendation Among Baby Boomers: An Exploratory Survey Study.

South Med J 2019 Mar;112(3):147-153

From the Department of Internal Medicine in the Division of General Internal Medicine, the Department of Internal Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases, the Department of Internal Medicine in the Division of Rheumatology, and the Department of Internal Medicine in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center at the Permian Basin, Odessa.

Objectives: To examine population awareness of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing recommendation for the 1945 to 1965 birth cohort and explore the factors associated with awareness of the testing recommendation, its association with HCV testing, and respondents' data sources about the recommendation.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess awareness of the CDC birth cohort testing recommendation among adults born 1945-1965 who were managed at a single academic center's internal medicine clinics or by visiting a local health fair. Data were collected on respondents' demographics and HCV-related domains, including risk factors, awareness, data sources, prior testing, and interest in information about testing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000946DOI Listing
March 2019
1.116 Impact Factor

Characteristics of Syncope Admissions Among Hospitals of Varying Teaching Intensity.

South Med J 2019 Mar;112(3):143-146

From the Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, and the Biostatistics Collaboration Center and the Department of Medicine, Northwestern University School of Medicine, Chicago Illinois.

Objectives: Previous work suggests that hospitals' teaching status is correlated with readmission rates, cost of care, and mortality. The degree to which teaching status is associated with the management of syncope has not been studied extensively. We sought to characterize the relation between teaching status and inpatient syncope management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000942DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

On "Improving Underrepresented Minority in Medicine Representation in Medical School".

South Med J 2019 Mar;112(3):142

St George's University of London London, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000940DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Development of a Vertically Integrated Trainee Program: Linking Future and Young Physicians.

South Med J 2019 Mar;112(3):137-141

From the University of South Carolina, Columbia, the University of Alabama Medical Center, Birmingham, and the Columbia Medical Society, Columbia, South Carolina.

Supplemental digital content is available in the text. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000952DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

A 5-Step Framework for the Assessment and Remediation of a Struggling Medical Learner in the Clinical Environment.

South Med J 2019 Mar;112(3):135-136

From the Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000939DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Outcomes in Patients with Left Ventricular Assist Devices, Pacemakers, and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Undergoing Single Balloon Enteroscopy.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):130-134

From the Departments of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, Internal Medicine, and Evidence-Based Medicine and Research Outcomes, University of South Florida, Tampa.

Objectives: Obscure overt gastrointestinal bleeding can be challenging to evaluate in patients with electronic cardiac devices such as continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), pacemakers (PPMs), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). Limited data exist on the utility and safety of single balloon enteroscopy (SBE) in patients with cardiac devices. We aimed to evaluate the safety, efficacy, diagnostic, and therapeutic outcomes of the aforementioned devices in patients undergoing SBE. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000938DOI Listing
February 2019
12 Reads

An Underappreciated and Prolonged Drug Interaction Leads to Ineffective Anticoagulation.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):125-129

From the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy, Memphis, Memphis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Memphis, Tennessee, and the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis.

A poorly understood significant drug-drug interaction compounded by ineffective communication among providers at times of care transition most likely contributed to multiple thromboembolic events in an 81-year-old patient. Increased awareness of drug interactions with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), as well as improved communication among inpatient and outpatient providers at the time of discharge is essential in maximizing efficacy and safety outcomes in patients requiring chronic anticoagulation. When rifampin is coadministered with apixaban, a reduction in apixaban exposure results in decreased efficacy and increased risk for thromboembolic events. Read More

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http://sma.org/southern-medical-journal/article/an-underappr
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000926DOI Listing
February 2019
5 Reads

Imaging in Acute Pyelonephritis: Utilization, Findings, and Effect on Management.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):118-124

From Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, and the University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine, Aurora.

Objectives: To determine the frequency, timing, and types of imaging obtained in patients with a discharge diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis, and how often imaging findings affect therapy.

Methods: This was a retrospective chart review of 1062 adults with a diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis discharged from an urban, safety-net hospital between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012. From the 739 patients selected after exclusions, we determined the number and proportion of patients imaged within the first 24 hours of admission, stratified by risk factors for pyelonephritis complications, and the frequency of positive findings leading to invasive interventions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000936DOI Listing
February 2019
16 Reads

Cancer Risk Awareness among Uninsured Primary Care Patients.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):112-117

From the Department of Sociology, the School of Medicine, and the Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Utah, and the Maliheh Free Clinic, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Objectives: Underserved populations are at risk of low cancer risk awareness. The purpose of this study was to examine cancer risk awareness and lifestyle issues among uninsured primary care patients in the United States.

Methods: Data were collected using a self-administered survey from May to July 2017 of adult free clinic patients (N = 506) who spoke English or Spanish. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000937DOI Listing
February 2019
10 Reads

Can C-Reactive Protein Be Used to Predict Acute Septic Arthritis in the Adult Population?

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):108-111

From Arrowe Park Hospital, Wirral, and Hull York Medical School, York, United Kingdom.

Objectives: The objective of this study was to establish whether C-reactive protein (CRP) could be used to predict native joint septic arthritis (SA) in the adult population.

Methods: All patients who underwent native joint aspiration in accident and emergency settings between April 2012 and September 2016 were identified from laboratory microbiology records. Patients were divided into three groups for analysis: patients with SA, patients with crystal arthropathy, and patients with normal or osteo/inflammatory arthritic joints. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000927DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Commentary on "Strengthening Rural States' Capacity to Prepare for and Respond to Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2013-2015".

Authors:
Mary Jane Burton

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):106-107

From the G.V. "Sonny" Montgomery Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000931DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Strengthening Rural States' Capacity to Prepare for and Respond to Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2013-2015.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):101-105

From the Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, the Oklahoma State Department of Health, Oklahoma City, and the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Helena.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000930DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6365294PMC
February 2019

Healthcare Disparities in People with Disabilities: Is There a Cure?

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):98-100

From the Neiswanger Institute, Loyola University, Chicago, Illinois.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000928DOI Listing
February 2019

The Importance of Health and Social Services Spending to Health Outcomes in Texas, 2010-2016.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):91-97

From the Arizona State University School for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Phoenix, and the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.

Objectives: Public health and social services spending have been shown to improve health outcomes at the county level, although there are significant state and regional variations in such spending. Texas offers an important opportunity for examining nuances in the patterns of association between local government health and social services spending and population health outcomes. The primary objectives of this study were to describe local investments in education, health, and social services at the county-area level for all of Texas from 2002 through 2012 and to examine how changes in local investment over time were associated with changes in health outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000935DOI Listing
February 2019
5 Reads

Curing Health Care by Adding Value: How About a Physical Examination?

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):89-90

From Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Florida.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000925DOI Listing
February 2019

Signed, Sealed, Delivered: Increasing Patient Notification of Test Results in an Internal Medicine Resident Continuity Clinic.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):85-88

From the Department of Internal Medicine, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Baton Rouge, the Department of Medicine, University of Alabama, Birmingham, and the Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama.

Objectives: Informing patients of their test results is an important patient safety issue, yet many physicians perform dismally in this regard. Residents often face additional barriers to communicating test results to patients. We wanted to determine whether streamlining the notification process, communicating expectations, and having residents audit their performance would increase result notification rates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000929DOI Listing
February 2019
9 Reads

Commentary on "What Attracts Medical Students to Primary Care? A Nominal Group Evaluation".

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):83-84

From the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine and the Office of Health Equity and Inclusion, University of Utah Health Sciences Campus, Salt Lake City, Utah.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000934DOI Listing
February 2019

What Attracts Medical Students to Primary Care? A Nominal Group Evaluation.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):76-82

From the Departments of Medicine and Family and Community Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, the Department of Medical Education, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, and Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.

Objective: To examine the perceptions of first-year medical students on their experiences in primary care.

Methods: Nominal group technique sessions were conducted with first-year medical students for 5 years. Questions were designed to evaluate primary care experiences and the role of primary care physicians. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000933DOI Listing
February 2019
10 Reads

Comparison of Medical Student Communication Skills Measured by Standardized Patients During an OSCE and by Faculty During an In-Hospital Encounter.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):70-75

From the Department of Internal Medicine, University New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque.

Objectives: At our institution, learner communication skills during an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) are measured by standardized patients (SPs) using the New Mexico Clinical Communication Scale (NM-CCS). Faculty physicians also conduct a direct observation of a clinical encounter (DOCE) to observe students' interactions with real hospitalized patients. The objective of this study was to determine whether students have similar communication skills scores with real patients as compared with SPs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000932DOI Listing
February 2019

Addressing Mental Health Needs among Physicians.

South Med J 2019 Feb;112(2):67-69

From the John Peter Smith Family Medicine Residency, Fort Worth, Texas, the Waukesha Family Medicine Residency/University of Wisconsin, Waukesha, the Department of Family Medicine, University of Massachusetts School of Medicine, Worchester, and San Joaquin General Hospital, French Camp, California.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000924DOI Listing
February 2019

Healthcare Professionals and In-Flight Medical Emergencies: Resources, Responsibilities, Goals, and Legalities as a Good Samaritan.

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):60-65

Common in-flight emergencies include syncope, respiratory symptoms, nausea/vomiting, cardiac symptoms, and seizures. Flight conditions, such as changes in air pressure and humidity, can exacerbate existing chronic medical conditions. In 2017, US airlines carried 849. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000922DOI Listing
January 2019
15 Reads

Clinical Utility of Routine Chest X-Rays During the Initial Stabilization of Trauma Patients.

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):55-59

From the San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, the William Beaumont Army Medical Center, Fort Bliss, the Army Medical Department (AMEDD) Center and School, Fort Sam Houston, and the US Army Institute for Surgical Research, San Antonio, Texas.

Objectives: The Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course encourages the use of chest x-ray (CXR) to identify injuries that may change clinical management during the initial stage of trauma resuscitations. Several studies have failed to show benefit for the routine use of CXR without a clinical indication, however. We sought to validate these findings by determining the incidence of clinically significant findings discovered on a portable single-view CXR during the initial stabilization of trauma patients at a Level 1 trauma center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000921DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Ebola 101.

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):54

University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000909DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Commentary on "Evaluation of Patients for Zika Virus Infection in a Travel Clinic in the Southeast United States, 2016".

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):52-53

From the Internal Medicine Department, European University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000918DOI Listing
January 2019
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Evaluation of Patients for Zika Virus Infection in a Travel Clinic in the Southeast United States, 2016.

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):45-51

From the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine and the Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, and the School of Public Health, State University of New York, Albany.

Objectives: Zika virus is an emerging infection that has posed vexing challenges to the US public health system. Improved characterization of patients with possible and confirmed infection is needed to better understand risks for infection in US travelers and to inform evolving evaluation guidelines.

Methods: We performed a retrospective electronic health record review of patients evaluated for Zika virus infection at an academic travel clinic in Atlanta, Georgia, from January 1 through August 31, 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000917DOI Listing
January 2019
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Radiologic versus Endoscopic Placement of Gastrostomy Tube: Comparison of Indications and Outcomes at a Tertiary Referral Center.

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):39-44

From the University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Greenville, the Departments of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, the Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, and the Department of Internal Medicine, Ochsner Medical Center Jefferson, Louisiana.

Objectives: Percutaneous gastrostomy tube placement is performed in patients requiring long-term enteral nutrition. Although both endoscopic and fluoroscopic techniques may be used, there are inherent risks and potential complications associated with both procedures that are not generally known to referring physicians. The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast indications for placement and procedurally related complications between fluoroscopic and endoscopic gastrostomy tubes techniques at a tertiary care facility. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000916DOI Listing
January 2019
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Patients' Perceptions of the Role of Physicians in Questioning and Educating in Firearms Safety: Post-FOPA Repeal Era.

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):34-38

From Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Florida and Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Health Professions Division, College of Pharmacy, Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida.

Objectives: In this study, we determined patients' attitudes toward discussing firearms and issues of firearms safety with emergency department physicians. We assessed whether patients feel discriminated against should physicians discuss firearms safety, and whether they believed that physician counseling may change how patients store firearms.

Methods: From June to October 2017, we conducted a cross-sectional institutional review board-approved survey of 200 consenting adult patients (convenience sample) not requiring critical care presenting to the emergency department of Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach, Florida. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000915DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Editor's Response.

Authors:
G Richard Holt

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):33

University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, Texas.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000920DOI Listing
January 2019
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Uterine Surrogacy is Morally Equivalent to Selling a Kidney.

Authors:
Conor McCartney

South Med J 2019 Jan;112(1):32

Saint Louis University School of Medicine St Louis, Missouri.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000910DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read